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LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY MAb^ 



3 4864 00181 4663 




Hittcoln public Hibrarp 

August 1982 



c.2 



ANNUAL REPORT 



1981 




Lincoln 
Massachusetts 



16 3 V 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/townreport19811982linc 



REPORT 

of the 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 1981 




Lincoln, Massachusetts 



Cover - We are grateful to Stephen Sakowich of the DeCordova 
Museum staff for his help in designing the cover for 
the 1981 Town Report. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 5 

Town Clerk 14 

FINANCE 

Town Treasurer 43 

Town Accountant 48 

Board of Assessors 60 

Collector of Taxes 63 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire and Police Departments 65 

Public Safety Board 68 

Inspectors of Building, Wiring and Plumbing 69 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 71 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 72 

Animal Inspector 76 

Council on Aging 77 

Dog Officer 80 

Solid Waste Disposal 81 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 83 

Board of Appeals 86 

Conservation Commission 88 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 92 

Housing Commission 95 

Energy Committee 100 

Water Commissioners 102 

Public Works 105 

Tree Warden 106 

Pierce Property Committee 107 

Cemetery Commissioners 109 

Historical Commission 110 

Historical District Commission 111 

Codman Community Farms 113 

Flag Pole Committee 117 



LIBRARY, RECREATION and SCHOOLS Page 

Lincoln Public Library 119 

DeCordova .Museum 5 Park 128 

Bemis Lecture Trustees 138 

Recreation Committee 139 

Lincoln Youth Committee 140 

Codman Pool Committee 141 

Elementary School Committee 143 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School Committee 149 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional Scholarship Fund Committee 161 

Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School District 162 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Vital Statistics 168 

Valuation List 174 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 208 



TOWN CALENDAR 



SELECTMEN 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 
BOARD OF HEALTH 
PLANNING BOARD 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1981-82 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF 
OFFICERS 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR 
REGISTRATION 

REGISTERED VOTERS 

TOWN OFFICES 



--Every Monday of each month, 7:30 p.m. 
Town Hall, 259-8850 

—Every other Monday evening, 8:00 p.m. 
Superintendent's Office, 259-9400 

--For appointments call Town Hall, 
259-8850 

--Meetings by appointment 

--Meetings by appointment 

--Every other Wednesday evening, 
8:00 p.m., Town Hall, 259-8850 

--First and third Wednesdays of each 
month, 8:00 p.m., Town Hall, 259-8850 

--5,151 (Town Census) 

--14.56 square miles 

—$16.60 per $1,000 valuation 

--Saturday before the last Monday in 
March - March 27, 1982 

--Last Monday in March - March 29, 1982 

--Residence in Town of Lincoln 



-3,261 (As of July 1, 1981) 

■-Open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. (Closed Saturdays) 
Telephone 259-8850 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Henry M. Morgan 

Ann F. Sutherland 

John A. Ritsher, Chairman 

1981 has been a year without dramatic issues or confrontations 
as the Town adapted its methods of operating to the new fiscal 
environment. Fiscal 1982 beginning on July 1 marked the first year 
under the new and untested parameters of Proposition 2%, and its 
implications have overshadowed most activity during the year. 

FINANCES 

The budgeting process in preparation for the 1981 Town Meeting 
presented a novel set of issues for the Town's officers because for 
the first time we were faced with conforming the proposals for 
spending to meet the available tax dollars rather than vice versa. 
The Alice-in-Wonderland aspect of this process was compounded by the 
fact that the quirks of the system for all governmental levels - state 
county and town - made it extremely difficult to predict in advance 
what funds would be available (tax levy, local aid, etc.) or what 
demands outside our local control would reduce our available funds 
(namely, county budget, MBTA assessment, regional school contributions 
etc.). Nevertheless, the Town bodies cooperated in producing a budget 
designed to preserve most of the basic services expected by the Town 
but devoid of the traditional line-item contingencies for unforeseen 
overtime and unexpected maintenance or expense items which in the 
past have provided a built-in cushion against unanticipated demands. 
However, the budget did contain a larger-than-usual Reserve Fund 
because of the recognition that the " lean budget" would be less able 
to withstand unplanned drains. 

We have now lived through six months of Fiscal 1981 and are well 
into the planning for the second year of Proposition 2h. Some obvious 
conclusions can be drawn. The "lean budget" was indeed lean. Many 
line items have already been, or predictably will be, excessively 
drained so that calls on the Reserve Fund will be necessary. 



We have wholeheartedly embraced the "user fee" concept for more 
equitable allocation of costs away from the general taxpayers. Fees 
for services provided to individual users of particular services have 
been dramatically raised from septic tank pumpers to wedding licenses. 
We anticipate further fee increases for the land fill and for use of 
the Town ball fields and will recommend others where feasible. Despite 
these increases, the Town's receipts, aside from the levy itself, have 
declined because 2\ drastically reduced the auto excise and the 
economy has negatively affected other revenue producing activity. 

Finally, the initial year under 2] has resulted in a perceptible, 
but not dramatic, reduction in services rendered. Land fill hours 
have been reduced to three days per week which held costs level. Town 
participation in the MDC sewer system has been terminated which saved 
the Town approximately $20,000. Overtime in DPW has been utilized 
more sparingly and, as noted below, the character and magnitude of 
DPW projects has altered. 

Approaching the new year's budget, we are faced with two stark 
realities: total revenues will only expand by an estimated 3% to 5% 
given the constraints of an unmodified 2\ and continuing inflation 
will force expenditures to increase at a greater rate. If 2\ is 
followed, the only options are to reduce personnel or services. In 
Lincoln where staffing is already close to the minimum, reductions in 
personnel would mean drastic reductions in service and the Selectmen 
have determined that assurance of public safety services and protection 
of our existing personnel are top priorities. While Lincoln has been 
criticized as extravagant for some of its appropriations, the budget 
has typically not been excessive in relation to required expenditures. 
The Selectmen continue to believe that prudent planning should provide 
not only for adequate services in the present but also for maintenance 
and appropriate replacement of our physical assets to assure their 
continuing useful life. Maintenance deferred can only lead to greater 
costs at a later date. Therefore, we anticipate recommending a limited 
override of 2\ to permit sound preparation for the future. 

Traffic 

The perennial problem of traffic problem of traffic congestion 
and hazards continues to be a primary concern of the Town. The existing 
conditions on Route 2 - with 80 accidents and 2 fatalities during the 
year - constitute a clear and present danger and yet the Commonwealth 
continues to drag its feet on the safety upgrades agreed to in 1980. 
The Selectmen from Lincoln, Concord and Acton continue to work collect- 
ively to pressure for safety improvements but the environmental review 
process will delay menaingful activity for at least another year. Our 
efforts are currently directed toward achieving safety improvements 
on the present route as the near-term goal with a relocated northerly 
alignment in Lincoln and limited access redesigning in all three towns 
as the long-term goal. 

In the meantime, existing traffic congestion and the imminent 
additional traffic to be generated by light industrial and office 
complexes planned for neighboring towns threaten greater impacts on 
our town road system. A four community committee, the Hanscom Area 



Traffic Committee, has been formed by Bedford, Concord, Lexington and 
Lincoln to study the traffic problems in the Hanscom area and recommend 
solutions. Lincoln is actively participating with representation by 
the Selectmen, Planning Board and John Caswell, who has been developing 
a computer program to analyze traffic patterns in the Lincoln area. 
The Selectmen continue to strive for a general plan to correct the 
problem while resisting piecemeal solutions - particularly in the 
Virginia Road area - which we believe will only aggravate the situation 
in our Town and have a negative impact on residents in that area. 

Aware that developments in other adjoining towns can seriously 
affect our traffic patterns, the Selectmen have encouraged the Plann- 
ing Board to pursue studies to determine how we can best protect the 
safety of our roads and minimize such adverse traffic impacts. 

Town Offices 

The Town and its individual Boards and Commissions continue to 
receive yeoman service from our administrative personnel. We have 
attempted to introduce some changes to improve working conditions and 
communications between the separated office locations. The inaugura- 
tion of a central, interconnected phone system has been a mixed bless- 
ing. While it permits the inquiring citizen to reach all the offices 
through one number, it does not provide sufficient flexibility for 
interoffice communication, and it unduly hampers the individual workers 
because too much time is spent locating the person being called and 
transferring calls. Clearly, further improvements are needed. The 
biggest change was the computerization of the Town accounts which began 
in July. Town Accountant Betty Lang and her colleagues devoted count- 
less extra hours to the changeover during the break-in period. The 
result has been extremely beneficial to the Town by reducing the lag- 
time between expenditures and accounting and by providing more timely 
and accurate reports and forecasts. 

The office facilities themselves continue to be less than accept- 
able for the long term. Our personnel are comp?cted into the small 
available offices at Town Hall where, during the day, the traffic of 
citizens and the cacophony of the telephone make their working con- 
ditions extremely difficult. During the evenings these offices moon- 
light as conference areas for the various Town boards resulting in the 
dislocation and disruption of the office staff's materials. The 
Selectmen have reactivated a Space Committee to once again review the 
available alternatives for a long-term solution to the ever-increas- 
ing inadequacy of the administrative office facilities. 

Departments 

Our Public Safety Department was strengthened by the arrival of 
our new fire engine just in time for the Fourth of July parade. It 
replaced our "antique", Engine No. 3, and has proved to be a highly 
effective and usable piece of equipment. It proudly represented 
Lincoln at the disastrous fire in Lynn in October. 



The hydrologies] study of the Town Land fill required by Dl 
has beef) satisfactorily completed. The results indicated mini ui.i 1 
impact OH surrounding ground waters and no threat to any water supply. 
Follow-up testing of the sampling wells will continued. \ ■■> cond 
tier has been initiated which will improve drainage, and the Town 
been the beneficiary of a substantial quantity of impervious cover 
material from the MBTA Red Line construction site. 

In December, the Selectmen signed a 20-year agreement to partici- 
pate in the NESWC Solid Waste Recovery Plant to be built in North 
Andover. This project offers a cost-competitive method of disposal of 
^olid waste which is expected to be on line in 198S. The Selectmen 
would like to express their appreciation to Henry Rugo for his untiring 
efforts in representing the Town on the solid waste study committees 
and his helpful evaluation of the competing proposals. The Town is 
deeply indebted to Henry for his volunteered assistance. 

In line with the Selectmen's policy decision three years ago, 
the Public Works Department has been concentrating its efforts on 
maintenance jobs rather than major construction. The five-year pro- 
gram of road work was followed by completing projects on Baker Bridge, 
Page and Old County Roads and, in compliance with the views expressed 
at Town Meeting, the drains on Bedford Road were lowered. 

MISCELLANEOUS 



The Historic District Commission was officially appointed in 
early summer to implement the decision at Town Meeting. At the other 
end of the spectrum, and Ad Hoc Committee of Cable TV was appointed 
to study the potential of that industry and its implication for 
Lincoln. 

The Town's citizens continue to support and assist in the Town's 
activities and the number and quality of the applicants to fill the 
occasional vacancies on Town Boards has been gratifying. Lincoln 
depends heavily on such volunteered participation. 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



MODERATOR Term Expires 

David M. Donaldson 1983 

TOWN CLERK 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 1983 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Henry M. Morgan 1984 

Ann F. Sutherland 1983 

John A. Ritsher, Chairman 1982 

TOWN TREASURER 

Elliott V. Grabill 1982 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Joseph W. Howard 1982 

John T. Franklin 1983 

Douglas M. Burchett, Chairman 1984 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Elliott V. Grabill 1983 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Paula Bennett 1984 

Eleanor Gallitano 1982 

Roger M. Barzun 1983 

James W. Spindler 1983 

Elizabeth Corcoran, Chairman 1984 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 



Stuart B. Avery, Jr. 1984 

John R. H. Kimball 1983 

Frederick M. Tingley, Chairman 1982 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

George P.Faddoul, D.V.M 1982 

John M. O'Loughlin 1983 

William B. Stason, M.D., Chairman 1984 

REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Alan H. Grathwohl 1984 
Ronald L. Blecher (deceased) 

Linda Glass 1982 

Joan W. Wofford 1982 

Richard F. Brooks 1983 

William A. King 1983 

Dante Germanotta, Chairman 1984 

CEMETER Y CCT-MISSI ONERS 

H. Arnold MacLean 1982 

James DeNormandie 1983 

Marjorie L. Holland 1984 



PLANNING BOARD 



Robert C. Brannen 

Basil Chigas 

Rosamond Delori 

Guy Guarino 

William Constable, Chairman 



John R. Caswell 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



Term Expires 
1982 
1986 
1985 
1983 
1984 



Archer desCognets 
Virginia M. Niles 
William B. Russell 



Saville Davis 
Nancy B. Ellis 
Amalie Kass 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 



1982 
1983 
1984 



1984 
1982 
1983 



TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 



David Ford 
Douglas Harding 
Mary Newman 

Robert Shenton (Selectmen's Appointee) 
Carolyn Birmingham (School Committee Appointee) 
Eleanor H. Fitzgerald (Elected by Town) 

DECORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 



John H. Cantlin 
John Pike 
Walter J. Salmon 
Dorothy Thompson 



'A M Directors 



'B" Directors 



Chester d'Autremont (Library Trustees Appointee) 
Owen Beenhouwer (School Committee Appointee) 
Margaret Wengren (Selectmen Appointee) 



HOUSING COMMISSION 



John R. Benson 
Katherine S. McHugh 
Richard D. Paris 
William B. Russell 
Elizabeth J. Snelling 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 



Sarah Bobbitt 
Kenneth Laurence 
Conrad H. Todd 

John B. Garrison 
Eleanor T. King 
Mary Silverstein 



(Elected by Town) 
(Elected by Town) 
(Elected by Town) 

(Selectmen Appointee) 
(Selectmen Appointee) 
(Selectmen Appointee) 



self -perpetuating 
self -perpetuating 
self -perpetuating 

1984 
1982 
1983 



1983 
1982 
1984 
1985 

1982 
1983 
1984 



1984 
1983 
1982 
1983 
1984 



1984 
1983 
1982 

1982 
1983 
1984 



Russell L. Barnes 

Larry V. Paxton 
Betty L. Lang 
Virginia M. Niles 
William N. Swift 
Francis C. Emmons, Jr. 
Richard P. Carroll 
Dominick James Arena 
Charles E. Doyle 
David Davis 



Donald Bardsley 
Allen Bowles 
David Finan 
John Fitzgerald 
Richard J. Hallett 
Barbara LeVan 
Kevin Mooney 
Thomas Moran 



Dominick James Arena 
Charles E. Doyle 



TREE WARDEN 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



Term Expires 
1982 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



TOWN COUNSEL 



TOWN ENGINEER 



DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 



CHIEF OF POLICE 



DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE-PROSECUTOR 



POLICE SERGEANT 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Laura Perry 



Dominick James Arena 



Dominick James Arena 



Ernest L. Johnson 



CONSTABLES 



DOG OFFICER 



FIRE CHIEF 



FOREST WARDEN 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 



1982 
1982 



1982 



1982 



198: 



1982 



Ernest L. Johnson 
Kenneth Desmond 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



WIRE INSPECTOR 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



Russell J. Dixon 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENCE S EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
Thomas B. Moran 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 5 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNE SS 
Larry V. Paxton 



Eric Williams 



Curtis Risley 



William B. Whalen 



William B. Whalen 



Margaret M. Martin 



COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 



ASSISTANT COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 



VETERANS' AGENT 



VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 



TOWN HISTORIAN 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 



William G. Langton 

Kerrie Luce 

Eleanor M. Wilfert 

Elizabeth J. Snelling, Ex officio 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Clifford Bowles 

Lucy Cole 

Mary Ford 

Harry Healey. Jr. 

Robert Henderson 

Joan Klotz 

Sally Mansfield 

John Manzelli 

Louise Meeks 

Anne Satterfield 

Frederick B. Taylor 

Beverly Eckhardt, Chairman 

MINUTEMAN HOME CARE CORPORATION 



Beverly Eckhardt, Chairman 
Miriam Korhonen, Alternate 



982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 



1982 
1983 
1984 



1984 
1982 
1982 
1984 
1984 
1982 
1983 
1983 
1983 
1983 
1982 
1984 



1982 
1982 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Kenneth Bassett 1984 

Joseph Bower 1984 

Lydia H. Dane 1984 

James DeNormandie 1982 

William M. Preston 1983 

William J. Rizzo, Jr. 1984 

John Quincy Adams, Chairman 1982 

REPRESENTATIVES TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 

C. Russel Hansen, Jr. 1982 

Katherine McHugh, Alternate 1982 

REPRESENTATIVE ON WALDEN POND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

John Quincy Adams 1982 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MAPC 

John R. Caswell 1983 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Barbara Barker (Resigned) 

D'Arcy MacMahon 1984 

Mary W. Sheldon (Appointed) 1983 

David F. Sykes 1986 

Jane Cooper Williams 1985 

James McHugh, Chairman 1982 

Morton Braun, Associate Member 1984 

Margaret Marsh 1982 

REPRESENTATIVE TO HANSCOM ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

John Haggerty 1982 

PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Joanna Bradshaw 
Lynn Donaldson 
Margaret Flint 
Margot Lindsay 
Aulikki 01 sen 
William Shea 
John French, Chairman 

REPRESENTATIVE ON MIDDLESEX COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 

Gordon P. Baird 

LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



John Carman (Appointed) 1983 

Robert A. Cunningham 1984 

Elizabeth Donaldson 1983 

Aulikki Olsen (Resigned) 

Colin Smith (Appointed) 1982 

Sumner Smith (Resigned) 

Paul Marsh , Chairman 1984 

CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Thomas Black 1983 

Donald Dawes 1984 

Jane Williams (Appointed) 1982 

William Rizzo (Resigned) 
Jacquelyn Snelling (Resigned) 9 



ENERGY COMMITTEE 



Becky Bartovics 

Margaret Hubbard 

Louisa Rand 

Pamela Reiser 

Judith Spear 

Peter Rothstein, Chairman 



James Barnet 
James Faran 
Margaret Simms 
John Stevenson 
H, Michael Tannert 



PUBLIC SAFETY BOARD 



REPRESENTATIVE TO NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 
AND 128 WEST RESOURCE RECOVERY COUNCIL 



Henry J. Rugo 



SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL STUDY COMMITTEE 



Christopher Carlson 
Ruth Ann Hendrickson 
Henry J. Rugo 

LINCOLN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION COMMITTEE 



Susan Brooks 

Carmela D'Elia 

George Faddoul 

Cecelia Ives 

Lex Taylor 

Pat Morse, Chairman 



SWIMMING POOL COMMITTEE 



Richard P. Carroll 
Harry Hadley (Resigned) 
Susan Harding 
Pamela Hansen 
Diane F. Nockles 
Jacquelyn Snelling 
Kay Yeuell 

VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 



Ruth Kales 



Bruce Bennett 
Denis Brennan 
Timothy Clancy 
Willis Collyer 
John Comeau 
Emmett Dickman 
William Erickson 
James Hanlon 
Joseph Hunchard 
Gail Larson 
Daniel Lemerise 
Alan McGroary 
Robert Mercon 



SPECIAL POLICE 



1983 
1983 
1982 
1982 
1984 
1984 



1983 
1984 
1983 
1984 
1983 



1982 



1982 
1982 
1982 



1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 



1985 

1984 
1984 
1985 
1983 
1983 



1982 



1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1932 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1932 



10 



SPECIAL POLICE (Cont.) 

Term Expire 

Frank Mills III 1982 

Kevin O'Brien 1982 

Joseph Paolilli 1982 

Thomas Rabbitt 1982 

John Roberts 1982 

George Schnare 1982 

Jeffrey Sherwin 1982 

Gordon Smith 1982 

John Tobin 1982 

Arthur Wickey 1982 

David Williams 1982 

(All of the above are Natural Resources Officers who are made 
special in order to legally issue parking tags at Walden Pond) 

Leo Algeo 1982 

Robert Bates 1982 

Gary Bardsley 1982 

Raymond Barnes 1982 

Joseph Bozak 1982 

Ann Campobasso 1982 

Lorraine Dean 1982 

Richard Carroll 1982 

Edward Chisholm 1982 

Arthur Cotoni 1982 

Joseph Cotoni 1982 

William Dean 1982 

Peter Dewey 1982 

William Doherty 1982 

John Doyle 1982 

Neil Duane 1982 

Robert Dupreuil 1982 

Richard Goddard 1982 

Frank Gordon, Sr. 1982 

Frank Gordon, Jr. 1982 

George Hofferty 1982 

Chrisopher Ireland, Jr. 1982 

Jeffrey Joachim 1982 

Stephen Lennon 1982 

Nathalie W. Lowe 1'982 

Donald Gibbs 1982 

David Maher 1982 

Gerald Mahoney, Jr. 1982 

Dennis C. Mahoney 1982 

Robert Marshall 1982 

Paul McGovern 1982 

Hazel Mclnnis 1982 

Dennis Murphy 1982 

Mary Murphy 1982 

John McLellan 1982 

John O'Loughlin 1982 

Charles O'Loughlin 1982 

John 01 sen 1982 

William Orpik 1982 

Richard Pazzano 1982 

Theodore Poulos 1982 

William Ryan n 1982 



SPECIAL POLICE (Cont.) 



George Thomas 
W. Royce Taylor, IV 
Walter VanWart 
Deborah Walkey 
David Whalen 
Eric Whalen 
William Whalen, Jr. 
William Whalen, Sr. 
Eric Williams 
George Yore, Jr. 
Amy Wales 
Stephen Ziegler 



David M. Donaldson 
Donald C. Lynde 
William C. Mason 
Rodney E. Moss 
Roland W. Robbins 
Sean Feeney 



Elaine Courtney 
Nancy A. Zuelke 



AUXILIARY POLICE 



Virginia M. Niles 

Madge K. Fisher 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 
Laura Perry 



Pamela J. Maus 

George Roehr 

Virginia Vockel , Chairman 



Edward S. Dewey 

David El wood 

Charlotte Friel 

Sarah C. Holden 

Lawrence Thompson. Chairman 



APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK 
ASSISTANT TOWN CLERKS 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 
ASSISTANT TREASURER 

APPOINTED BY THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
ASSISTANT COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



BURIAL AGENT 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 
PERSONNEL BOARD 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Term Expires 

1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 



1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1982 



1982 
1982 



1982 



198; 



1982 



1982 



1982 
1983 
1984 



1983 
1984 
1982 
1984 
1983 



12 



APPOINTED BY VARIOUS BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

YOUTH COMMITTEE 

Wayne Mount (School Committee Appointee) 
Sarah Bobbitt (Recreation Committee Appointee) 
Jan Tatlock (Selectmen's Appointee) 

SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

George C. Hibben (Selectmen's Appointee) 
Deborah C. French (Moderator's Appointee) 
Gail T. Najjar (School Committee's Appointee) 

Jacqueline Clement, ex officio 



Term Expires 

1984 
1982 
1983 



1983 
1982 
1984 



Jane Carlson 
Perry Culver 
Warren Flint, Jr, 
John Hammond 
Diana Smith 
Robert G. Wolf 



Robert A. Cunningham 
Alice Emery 
Edith Goodman 
Margaret A. Spaeth 
Linda Svetz 



Martha DeNormandie 
Gordon Donaldson 
Leo Algeo 



Basil Chigas 
Lucy F. Cole 
Elizabeth Donaldson 
Warren Flint 
Mary Ann Hales 
Harold A. Levey 
Mary Helen Lorenz 
Jean Risley 



•Jack Carver 
Gabriel Farrell 
James Flynn 
Bette Gurley 
Kas Kalba 
John Klobuchar 
Steven Lowe 
Robert Wolf 



Jr, 



LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 



BICYCLE PATH COMMITTEE 



FLAG POLE COMMITTEE 

(Library Appointee) 

(Historical Commission Appointee) 

(Moderator Appointee) 

SPACE COMMITTEE 



(Planning Board Appointee) 

(COA Appointee) 

(At Large 

(Conservation Commission Appointee) 

(Library Appointee) 

(Selectmen's Appointee) 

(At Large) 

(Day Care Appointee) 

CABLE TV COMMITTEE 



L3 



TOWN CLERK 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 



The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. Her duties in- 
clude recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections 
and notifying the Selectmen and other officers concerned of ap- 
propriations which have been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept in the 
Town Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters in the 
Town should communicate with the Clerk. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 28, 1981 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 9:35 a.m. The 
return of the Warrant was read, and the following business was 
transacted, a quorum being present; 

The Moderator called attention to Article 1 (Election of 
Officers), which will be acted upon on Monday, March 30, 1981. 
He then brought before the Meeting consideration of those articles 
appearing on the Consent Calendar, which had been sent to all voters 
at least seven days prior to Town Meeting. It was voted to hold 
out Articles 3 and 8; the other articles on the Calendar (Articles 
2, 4, 6 and 7) were then adopted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2 . (On Consent Calendar) 

To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees, and other officers re- 
quired by law to be elected by ballot, or otherwise. 
VOTED: That John R. Caswell be elected Measurer of Wood 

and Bark for the ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 3 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town officers, 

Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 

ARTICLE 4 . (On Consent Calendar) 

To fix the salaries and compensation of the 

14 



several elective officers of the Town, and to 
determine whether any Department, Board or Com- 
mittee shall be authorized to employ for additional compensation 
any of its members and to fix additional compensation of such mem- 
bers. 

VOTED : That the salaries of the elected officials of 

the Town for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 
1981, and ending June 30, 1982, be fixed at the following amounts: 
Town Clerk $ 200.00 

Treasurer $ Collector 10.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 
Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

and that the Board of Assessors is authorized to employ one of its 
members to work on Town mapping and additional assessing duties at 
a salary not to exceed $13,600 for the said fiscal period. 

ARTICLE 5 . To raise and appropriate money for the necessary 
and expedient purposes of the Town, or take any 

other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town adopt as separate appropriations 

the listed recommendations in Exhibit 3, attached 

to the report of the Finance Committee, printed on pages 11 through 

20, inclusive, of the Financial Section and Warrant for the 1981 

Town Meeting, except that the following: 

Item #102 - Police Department - Cruisers - will 
be increased by $1,578 to $8,578; 

Item #110 - Fire Department - Salaries - will be 
increased by $9,600 to $175,239; 
(This change resulted from an amend- 
ment offered by the Selectmen, which 
was approved by the Meeting by a 
majority voice vote.) 

Item #300 - Public Works Department - Salaries - 
will be increased by $5,000 to 
$168,805; (This change resulted 
from an amendment offered by the 
Selectmen, which was approved by the 
Meeting by a majority voice vote.) 

Item #301 - Public Works Department - Custom Ser- 
vice - will be increased by $1,000, 
to $20,075; (This change resulted 
from an amendment offered by the 
Selectmen, which was approved by the 

15 



Meeting by a majority voice vote.) 

Item #302 - Public Works Department - General 
Maintenance - will be increased by 
$9,000, to $59,250; (This change 
also resulted from an amendment 
offered by the Selectmen, which was 
approved by the Meeting by a majority 
voice vote.) 

Item #307 - Septage Processing - will be decreased 
by $20,400, to zero; 

Item #702 - Cemetery Department - Expense - will 
be increased by $9,500, to $18,100; 

Item #906 - Celebrations Committee - will be in- 
creased by $5,500 for fireworks, to 
$8,100; (This amendment was of- 
fered by Mr. Mark Naiman, and was 
approved by the Meeting by a majority 
standing vote.) 

Reserve Fund - will be decreased by $9,700, to 

$75,300. (This amendment was offered 
by the Selectmen, and was approved by 
the Meeting by a majority voice vote.) 

and that all items will be raised by taxation 
except to the following extent: 

Item #15 - Town Offices - Salaries - $10,000 to 
be taken from Water Department Re- 
ceipts, when received, and $18,000 
to be taken from the Air Force School 
Account; 

Item #16 - Town Offices - Expense - $2,000 to 
be taken from free cash; 

Item #100 - Police Department - Salaries - 

$53,000 to be taken from the Agency 
Account established for payments in 
lieu of taxes, and $75,000 to be taken 
from Federal Revenue Sharing Funds; 



16 



Item #102 - Police Department - Cruisers - 

$8,578 to be taken from free cash; 

Item #205 - Animal Officer - Salary - $258 to be 
taken from the Agency Account estab- 
lished for fees received for the 
care and custody of dogs; 

Item #502 - Highway Department - Ways § Parks - 
$30,000 to be taken from free cash; 

Item #502 - Elementary Schools - Instruction - 

$89,110 to be taken from Metco funds: 

Item #504 - Elementary Schools - Operation & 
Maintenance - $68.50 to be taken 
from the Grammar School Fund, and 
$1,595 to be taken from the Julian 
DeCordova School Equipment Fund; 

Item #5 20 - Library - Salaries - $1,204 to be 
taken from Dog Tax Receipts; 

Item #521 - Library - Books, etc. - $3,187 to 

be taken from State Aid to Libraries; 

Item #702 - Cemetery Department - Expense - 

$9,500 to be taken from the Cemetery 
Improvement Fund; 

Item #815 - Swimming Pool Bonds - $10,000 to be 
taken from the Agency Account estab- 
lished for funds to be received from 
the Codman Trustees; 

Item #816 - Interest on Swimming Pool Bonds - 
$1,840 to be taken from the Agency 
Account established for funds to be 
received from the Codman Trustees; 

Item #819 - Codman Kitchen - $2,500 to be taken 
from the Agency Account established 
for funds to be received from the 
Codman Trustees; 

Item #820 - Interest on Codman Kitchen - $718.75 
to be taken from the Agency Account 



17 



established for funds to be received 
from the Codman Trustees; 

Item #821 - Repairs to Codman Barns - $5,000 to 
be taken from the Agency Account 
established for funds to be received 
from the Codman Trustees; 

Item #822 - Interest on Codman Barns Notes - 

$2,062.50 to be taken from the Agency- 
Account established for funds to be 
received from the Codman Trustees; 

Item #901 - Employee Hospital 5 Insurance Fund - 
$20,000 to be taken from the Air 
Force School account; 

Item #913 - Housing Commission - $7,500 to be 
taken from free cash; 

Items #950 to #956 , inclusive - Water Department - 
$203,163 to be taken from Water De- 
partment receipts. 

The total for General Purposes for the fiscal period beginning July 
1, 1981, through June 30, 1982, is shown in Exhibit 3 as $5,266,988, 
and with the amendments listed above is now $5,278,065.25. After 
the application of the special funds as listed above, the amount to 
be raised is $4,920,613.50. 

(All items were voted unanimously, except as indicated above, and 
except for the following items: 

Item #73 - Election § Registration - Voting Devices - adopted by a 
majority voice vote; 

Item #85 - Consulting § Engineering - adopted by a majority voice 
vote.) 

At this point, Mr. Roger Barzun paid tribute to the retiring school 

committee member, Priscilla Damon, who received a standing vote of 

thanks for her dedicated service to the Town as a member of the School 
Committee for the past six years. 



At the conclusion of action under Article 5, the Town Meeting was 
temporarily adjourned at 12:35 p.m. The Moderator called attention 
to the fact that, at the conclusion of the lunch break, the first 

18 



order of business would be action on the Warrant for the Special 
Town Meeting, which had been scheduled at the conclusion of the 
discussion under Article 5. 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
March 28, 1981 

At 1:25 p.m., the Special Town Meeting was called to order by 
the Moderator, Mr. Donaldson, in accordance with a Warrant duly 
served. A quorum being present, the following business was trans- 
acted: 

A RTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a 

sum of money to repair damages to the Town Barn 
caused by fire, said sum to be taken from monies recovered from a 
fire insurance policy, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) That the sum of $10,000 be appro- 

priated for the purpose of repairing the damage 
to the Town Barn caused by fire, said sum to be taken from monies 
recovered from a fire insurance policy, and that the Town vote to 
exceed the appropriation limits established by Section 4 of Chapter 
151 of the Acts of 1979 by $214,887. 

ARTICLE 2 . To see if the Town will vote to convey all its 

right, title and interest in and to a portion of 
Bedford Lane, which in the opinion of the Selectmen is no longer re- 
quired for public purposes, to the United States of America, or the 
appropriate department thereof, for the use of the Minute Man Nation- 
al Historical Park, for the sum of $1.00 and other valuable consider- 
ations, and to authorize the Selectmen to execute, acknowledge and 
deliver, in the name and on behalf of the Town, such deeds and other 
documents as they may deem necessary or desirable to carry out the 
provisions of this vote, or to take any other action relative there- 
to. 
VOTED : (By majority voice vote) 

That the Selectmen are hereby authorized in the 
name and on behalf of the Town to convey all the 
Town's right, title and interest in and to a portion of Bedford Lane, 
which, in the opinion of the Selectmen, is no longer required for 
public purposes, to the United States of America, or the appropriate 
department thereof, for the use of the Minute Man National Historical 
Park. In order to carry out the provisions of this vote, the 
Selectmen are hereby authorized to execute, acknowledge and deliver, 
in the name and on behalf of the Town, such deeds and other documents 
as they may deem necessary or desirable. 



19 



ARTICLE 3 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate gifts 

of money and income received from use of con- 
servation properties for the maintenance and improvement of con- 
servation properties, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (By majority voice vote) 

That the Conservation Commission be and hereby 
is authorized for the fiscal year 1981-82 to ex- 
pend sums received from the use of conservation properties for the 
maintenance and improvement of conservation properties. 

ARTICLE 4 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Gen- 
eral Bylaws of the Town of Lincoln by striking 
out Section 3 of Article II - Town Meetings - and substituting in 
place thereof the following, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

" Section 3 . Every Town Meeting shall be called pursuant to 
a Warrant under the hands of the Selectmen 
stating the time and place of holding the same and the subjects 
to be acted upon, notice of which Warrant shall be given at 
least seven (7) days before the Annual Town Meeting and at 
least fourteen (14) days before any Special Town Meeting by a 
constable or other person to whom it is directed, who shall 
attest and post copies thereof in or on three or more buildings 
belonging to the Town or any three public places in the Town 
and make his return of service thereof to the Selectmen. In 
addition, the Selectmen shall send by mail or otherwise to each 
household within the Town, at least seven (7) days before the 
time appointed for such Meeting, a copy of such notice and War- 
rant, but failure to receive such notice and Warrant shall not 
invalidate any action taken at such Meeting." 
i r OTED : (Unanimously) That the General Bylaws of the 

Town of Lincoln be amended by striking out Sec- 
tion 5 of Article II - Town Meetings - and substituting in place 
thereof the following: 

" Section 3 . Every Town Meeting shall be called pursuant to a 
Warrant under the hands of the Selectmen, stating 
the time and place of holding the same and the subjects to be 
acted upon, notice of which Warrant shall be given at least 
seven (7) days before the Annual Town Meeting and at least four- 
teen (14) days before any Special Town Meeting, by a constable 
or other person to whom it is directed, who shall attest and 
post copies thereof in or on three or more buildings belonging 
to the Town or any three public places in the Town and make his 
return of service thereof to the Selectmen. In addition, the 
Selectmen shall send by mail or otherwise to each household in 
Town, at least seven (7) days before the time appointed for such 
meeting, a copy of such notice and Warrant, but failure to re- 
ceive such notice and Warrant shall not invalidate any action 
taken at such Meeting." 

: 



Upon completion of all business before the Special Town Meeting, it 
was moved, seconded and voted unanimously to adjourn at 2 p.m. 

CONTINUATION OF ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

At 2:05 p.m. the Annual Town Meeting was reconvened, and the 

following business was transacted: 

ARTICLE 6 . (On Consent Calendar) 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the rev- 
enue of the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1981, in accordance with 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and 
to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than 
one year, in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, 
as amended. 
VOTED : That the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 

Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the finan- 
cial year beginning July \ 3 1981, in accordance with the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to issue a 
note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. 

ARTICLE " . (On Consent Calendar) 

To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and the School Committee to continue 
the Town's annual contract with the U. S. Commissioner of Education 
to operate the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, 
Massachusetts, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the Town authorizes the Board of Selectmen 

and the School Committee to continue the Town's 
annual contract with the U. S. Commissioner of Education to operate 
the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to support the 

School Committee in its continuing plan to bring 

a limited number of children from Boston to the Lincoln Schools for 

purposes of education, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (Unanimously) That the Town authorizes the 

School Committee to continue the plan to bring 

a limited number of children from Boston to the Lincoln Schools for 

purposes of education. 



:: 



ARTICLE 9 . To sec if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 

priate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or any combination thereof, said 
sura to be used for the purchase of equipment for the use of various 
Town departments, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) That the sum of $129,000 be ap- 

propriated from free cash for the purchase of 
one dump truck to be used by the Public Works Department, and one 
fire engine with equipment to be used by the Fire Department. 

ARTI CLE 10 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 

Selectmen to petition the General Court to ex- 
tend the period for temporary borrowing on land purchased from the 
Umbrello Family Trust, as authorized under Article 12 of the Warrant 
for the March 24, 1979, Annual Town Meeting, for a period of one year 
from May 29, 1981, and to raise and appropriate a sum of money suffi- 
cient to cover interest charges for such period, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) That the Town authorizes the 

Selectmen to petition the General Court to ex- 
tend the period for temporary borrowing on land purchased from the 
Umbrello Family Trust, as authorized under Article 12 of the Warrant 
for the March 24, 1979, Annual Town Meeting, for a period of one 
year from May 29, 1981, and that the sum of $7,400 be hereby appro- 
priated to cover interest charges for such period, said sum to be 
taken from Conservation Receipts Reserve. 

ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to make minor improvements 
to the Center School and Town Hall for the use of the Town Administra- 
tive Offices; by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by bor- 
rowing, or by any combination of those methods, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (Unanimously) That the sum of $5,000 be hereby 

appropriated for the purpose of making minor im- 
provements to the Center School and the Town Hall buildings for the 
use of the Town Administrative Offices, such sum to come from free 
cash. 

ARTICLE 12 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
creation of a revolving account for Police De- 
tails, and to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
initiating said account, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) To authorize the creation of a 

revolving account for Police Details, and that 
the sum of $2,000 be hereby appropriated for the purpose of initiat- 
ing said account, said sum to be taken from free cash. 

22 



ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $12,571.50, or any other sum, to resurface 
a portion of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School building roof, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (Unanimously) That the Town appropriate the sum 

of $12,571.50, of which $2,138.23 shall be appro- 
priated out of residual moneys from Article 9 of the 1979 Lincoln 
Town Meeting, and $10,433.27 shall be raised by taxation, to be 
spent under the direction of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District 
School Committee, as the Town's proportionate share of the moneys 
to resurface a portion of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 
building roof, said appropriation being the Town's share of the 
total cost, not to be effective until the Town of Sudbury appropri- 
ates its share of the total cost. 

ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the agree- 
ment between the Town and the Lincoln-Sudbury 

Regional School District, dated January 28, 1954, as follows: 

Article 9 . (Preparation and Submission of Budgets). Amend 
Paragraph 3--line 18, to read: "Not later than 45 days prior 
to the earliest date on which the business session of the 
Annual Town Meeting of any member Town that is announced by 
the Moderator as the first session for budget consideration," 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : To indefinitely postpone the article. 

ARTICLE 15 . To see if the Town will vote to accept Amendment 

Number 3 to the agreement establishing the Minute- 
man Regional Vocational Technical School District "Minuteman", dated 
June 18, 1970, as proposed by vote of the Minuteman School Committee, 
by vote adopted on October 7, 1980. The amendment provides in sub- 
stance (i) that the term of office of each member of the Minuteman 
School Committee shall commence on July 1 of each year in which he 
or she is appointed, commencing with the year following the effective 
date of the amendment, rather than April 1 as is presently provided 
in the Agreement, and (ii) that the annual meeting of the Committee 
for the election of officers shall be held in each year on a date 
specified in the District by-laws, or take any other action relative 
thereto. (A copy of the proposed amendment is available for in- 
spection at the office of the Town Clerk.) 

VOTED : (Unanimously) That Amendment No. 3 to the Agree- 

ment establishing the Minuteman Regional Vocation- 
al Technical School District, a copy of which is filed in the office 
of the Town Clerk, be approved. 

The text of Amendment No. 3 is as follows: 



23 



The agreement among the towns of Acton, Arlington, Belmont, Bolton, 
Boxborough, Carlisle, Concord, Lancaster, Lexington, Lincoln, Need- 
ham, Stow, Sudbury, Wayland and Weston, entitled "Agreement with 
Respect to the Establishment of a Technical and Vocational Regional 
School District", as heretofore amended (the "Agreement") is here- 
by further amended, as follows: 

A. Subsection 1 (C) of the Agreement is amended by 
deleting the second sentence thereof, as in- 
serted by Amendment No. 2, and substituting in 
its place the following sentence: 

The Moderator of each town that shall be admitted 
to the District pursuant to Section VIII of this 
Agreement shall, prior to the date on which such 
admission takes effect, appoint one member to 
serve on the Committee beginning on such date for 
a term of three years or for such shorter term as 
may be necessary to retain symmetry of terms on 
the Committee as a whole. 

B. Subsection 1 (C) of the Agreement is further 
amended by deleting the last sentence thereof 
and substituting in its place the following sen- 
tence: 

The term of each member of the Committee shall 
commence on July 1 of the year in which he or she 
is appointed. 

C. Subsection 1 (E) of the Agreement is amended by 
deleting said subsection and substituting in its 
place the following subsection: 

(E) Annually, on a date specified in the by- 
laws of the District, the Committee shall 
organize and choose by ballot a chairman and a 
vice-chairman from among its own membership. 

D. Transition and Effective Date of Amendment No. 3 . 

Amendment No. 5 to the Agreement, proposed 
by vote of the Committee adopted on October 7, 
1980, shall take full effect on January 1 of the 
year following the year in which it has been 
accepted by all the member towns and the terms of 
all the members of the Committee in office on such 
January 1 shall be extended to expire at the com- 
mencement of the term of their successors in the 
year in which their terms would otherwise expire 

24 



pursuant to the Agreement as amended by Amend- 
ment No. 3. 

At this point, the Annual Town Meeting was temporarily ad- 
journed in order that a meeting of the Town might be convened. This 
meeting was held at the request of the Housing Commission so that it 
might explain the concept of the mixed income housing development it 
proposes to construct on the so-called "core" parcel of Umbrello 
land, now owned by the Rural Land Foundation, and on a portion of 
the adjoining Donaldson land, owned by the Heirs of R. D. Donaldson. 
The over-all concept of the development, which will contain a mix- 
ture of condominiums and rental units (40-45 in number) was explained. 
Both condominiums and rental units will be available both to pur- 
chasers at the market rate and to people of moderate income. (The 
profit from the sale of market units will be applied to the cost of 
the moderate units, thus making it possible to sell (or rent) them 
at a considerably reduced rate.) Various members of the Commission 
(Katherine McHugh, John Benson, Richard Paris and William Russell) 
took part in the presentation, with Elizabeth Snelling, the Chairman, 
acting as Moderator. Following the presentation, there was a brief 
period devoted to questions from the audience, as well as an oppor- 
tunity to comment on the merits of the proposal. The Commission 
reported that it expects to bring a definitive proposal to a Special 
Town Meeting in June, since it has not been possible to be ready for 
this Annual Town Meeting. The Meeting of the Town was adjourned at 
approximately 3:45 p.m., and the regular Annual Town Meeting was 
then reconvened. 



ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Gener- 
al By-Laws of the Town by adding a new Article 
XVI, entitled HOUSING COMMISSION, copies of which are available in the 
office of the Town Clerk, which would authorize the establishment of 
a revolving fund to be used by the Commission under certain condi- 
tions and for certain specific purposes, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 

ARTICLE 17 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for muni- 
cipal purposes, by purchase, eminent domain, or 
any other way, a parcel of land owned by the Rural Land Foundation 
of Lincoln, containing 14.5 acres, more or less, as shown outlined 
in red on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts", 
dated July 11, 1979, and revised February, 1981, by Cleverdon, Var- 
ney § Pike, Consulting Engineers, on file in the office of the Town 
Clerk; and for that purpose to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by 



25 



any combination of those methods, or take any other action relative 

thereto. 

'■ :~" : To pass over the article. 

ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for muni- 
cipal purposes, by purchase, eminent domain, or 
Other way, a parcel of land owned by the Heirs of R. D. Donald- 
son, containing 14 acres, more or less, as shown outlined in red on 
a plan er.titlei: " r re Plan of Land in Lincoln", dated March 
1, 19~S, by Zieve: i Pike, Consulting Engineers, on file 

in the office of the Town Clerk; and for that purpose to raise and 
appropriate a sum of mone; transfer from available 

T-^-is, by borrowing, : combination of those methods, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
v:~~: : To pass over the article. 

MtngUj ::- . To see if the Town will vote to change from an 
R-l Single Family Residence District to an R-2 
General Residence District the two parcels of land described below 
and to amend the Zoning Map of the Town to reflect those changes, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

(a) a certain parcel of land owned by the Rural Land 
Foundation of Lincoln and shown outlined in red 
on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, 
achusetts", dated July 11, 1979, and revised 
February, 1981, by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, Con- 
sulting Engineers, and 

(b) a certain parcel of land owned by the Heirs of 
R. D. Donaldson and shown outlined in red on a 
plan entitled "Preliminary Plan of Land in Lin- 
coln", dated March 1, 1978, trney 
§ Pike, Consulting Engineers. 

(Both plans are on file in the office of the Town Clerk.) 
V.'TZ: : To pass over the article. 

-.?~:ilH - " . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 

priate £ sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, : borrowing, or by any combination thereof, 
said sum to be used by the Water Commissioners to develop and build 
a water well in the well area shown on a plan of "Lincoln Ridge", by 
Schofield Brothers, Inc., dated Septenbex ~. ." ; . as amended Septem- 
ber 19, 19 T 8, together with an access thereto and all appurtenant 
facilities therefor, or take any other action relative thereto. 
(Copies of said plan are available in the office of the Town Clerk.) 
VOTED: Vr.--.:- : u5 . That the Water Commissioners are 



authorized to develop and build a water well in 
the well area shown on a plan of "Lincoln Ridge", 
by Schofield Brothers, Inc., dated September 7, 1978, as amended 
September 19, 1978, together with an access thereto and all appurten- 
ant facilities therefor; that the sum of $275,000.00 is appropriated 
therefor; that to meet such appropriation the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow the sum of 
$275,000.00 under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 8 (5), and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, 
payable in accordance with said Chapter 44; that the appropriate 
officers of the Town are authorized to apply for any available state 
and federal aid for this project, and that any such aid received 
shall be applied and is appropriated towards the expense of the pro- 
ject. 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination thereof, 
said sum to be used by the Water Commissioners to rebuild or repair 
the Town's open water reservoir off Bedford Road, and to construct 
a cover or tank therefor and associated pipes, fixtures and other 
equipment; and to acquire for this purpose by eminent domain, pur- 
chase or otherwise, land adjacent to the reservoir; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 

ARTICLE 22 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money, by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination thereof, 
said sum to be used by the Water Commissioners to improve the Town's 
water distribution system by installing water mains, together with 
appurtenant fixtures, of various sizes and lengths and in the loca- 
tions shown on a plan entitled "Recommended Improvements, Water Dis- 
tribution System", dated January, 1981, by Perkins/ Jordan, Consult- 
ing Engineers, on file in the office of the Town Clerk, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: To pass over the article. 

ARTICLE 23 . To see if the Town will vote to establish a Flag 
Pole Study Committee, in accordance with Article 
II, Section 12, of the General By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : To establish a Flag Pole Study Committee for the 

purpose of investigating options relative to the 
location and repair or replacement of the Town flag pole, consisting 
of three members, one to be appointed by the Historic Commission, 
one to be appointed by the Library Trustees, and one to be appointed 
by the Moderator. (Approved by majority voice vote.) 

27 



ARTICLE 24 . To see if the Town will vote to approve a new 
schedule of fees to be used by the Town Clerk, 
as authorized by Section 73 of Chapter 329 of the Acts of 1980, said 
schedule being presently on file in the office of the Town Clerk and 
available for inspection, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) That the Town adopt a new sched- 

ule of fees to be used by the Town Clerk, as 
authorized by Section 73 of Chapter 329 of the Acts of 1980, copies 
of which new schedule are on file in the office of the Town Clerk 
and have been distributed to the voters at this Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 25 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 

creation of a revolving account, consisting of 
funds donated to the Town, known as the Emergency Assistance Fund, 
for the purpose of providing emergency fuel and other assistance to 
Lincoln residents in time of need, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) To authorize the creation of a 

revolving account, known as the Emergency Assist- 
ance Fund, to receive monies donated to the Town for the purpose of 
providing emergency fuel and other assistance to Lincoln residents 
in time of need. 

ARTICLE 26 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the General 
By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln by adding the fol- 
lowing Article XVII, or take any other action relative thereto: 

" Article XVII . Any by-law of the Town of Lincoln or rule or 

regulation of its Boards, Commissions and 
Committees, the violation of which is subject to a specific 
penalty, may, in the discretion of the Town official who is 
the appropriate enforcing person, be enforced in the method 
provided in Section 21D of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, 
NON-CRIMINAL DISPOSITION OF CERTAIN VIOLATIONS. Enforcing 
person as used in this by-law shall mean any Selectman or 
any police officer of the Town of Lincoln with respect to 
any offense; the Building Inspector and his designee, the 
Conservation Commission and its designees, the Board of 
Health and its designees; and any such other official as the 
Board of Selectmen may from time to time designate, each 
with respect to violations of by-laws and rules and regula- 
tions within their respective jurisdictions. If more than 
one official has jurisdiction in a given case, any official 
may be an enforcing person with respect thereto." 
VOTED : (Unanimously) That the Town amend the General 

By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln by adding the fol- 
lowing Article XVI: 



28 



" ARTICLE XVI 

NON-CRIMINAL DISPOSITION OF VIOLATIONS 

Any by-law of the Town of Lincoln or rule or regulation of 
its Boards, Commissions and Committees, the violation of 
which is subject to a specific penalty, may, in the dis- 
cretion of the Town official who is the appropriate en- 
forcing person, be enforced in the method provided in 
Section 2 ID of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, NON-CRIMINAL 
DISPOSITION OF CERTAIN VIOLATIONS. Enforcing person as 
used in this By-Law shall mean any Selectman or any police 
officer of the Town of Lincoln with respect to any offense; 
the Building Inspector and his designee, the Conservation 
Commission and its designees; the Board of Health and its 
designees; and any such other official as the Board of 
Selectmen may from time to time designate, each with res- 
pect to violations of by-laws and rules and regulations 
within their respective jurisdictions. If more than one 
official has jurisdiction in a given case, any official may 
be an enforcing person with respect thereto." 

ARTICLE 27 . To see if the Town will vote to adopt the pro- 
visions of 4G of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, 
which section was added by Chapter 217 of the Acts of 1980, and 
which permit an increase from $2,000.00 to $4,000.00 as the amount 
which may be spent under certain Town contracts without complying 
with the competitive bidding requirements, and to see if the Town 
will vote to amend Article VI of the General By-Laws of the Town of 
Lincoln as follows: 

a) By substituting in Section 6a in said Article VI 
the figure $4,000.00 for $2,000.00 wherever the 
latter appears; and 

b) By substituting in Section 6b of said Article VI 
the figure $10,000.00 for the figure $5,000.00 
wherever the latter appears. 

VOTED : (By majority voice vote) 

That the Town adopt the provisions of Section 4G 
of Chapter 40, as amended by Chapter 217 of the 

Acts of 1980, and that Article VI of the General By-Laws of the Town 

of Lincoln be amended as follows: 

"a) By substituting in Section 6 (a) the figure 

$4,000.00 for the figure $2,000.00 wherever the 
latter appears; and 

29 



b) By substituting in Section 6 (b) the figure 

$10,000.00 for the figure $5,000.00 wherever the 
latter appears." 

ARTICLE 28 . To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 16 

of the Zoning By-Law, as most recently amended 
on March 24, 1979, by striking out the current provisions of Section 
16 regulating signs in their entirety and substituting completely 
revised regulations, copies of which are on file in the office of 
the Town Clerk, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (By a vote of 126 in favor, with 4 opposed) 

That the Town amend Section 16 of the Zoning By- 
Law, as most recently amended on March 24, 1979, 
by striking out the current provisions of Section 16 regulating 
signs in their entirety and substituting completely revised regula- 
tions, copies of which have been filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk and distributed to the voters at this Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 29 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the votes 
taken under Article 2 of the Special Town Meet- 
ing on November 5, 1979, whereby the sum of $36,890, received from 
the Commonwealth, was appropriated for general highway purposes, by 
appropriating said $36,890 towards the costs associated with the 
laying out and construction of a portion of Bedford Road, as shown 
on a preliminary plan presently on file in the office of the Town 
Clerk; to acquire necessary easements or interests in fee by eminent 
domain, purchase, or any other way, from private owners wherever 
shown on said plan; and to raise and appropriate a sum of money to 
cover the additional cost of this project, by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination thereof, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 

ARTICLE 30 . To see if the Town will vote to adopt a By-Law, 
copies of which are available in the office of 
the Town Clerk, establishing an Historic District Commission, under 
the provisions of Chapter 40C, General Laws, as most recently amended 
by Chapter 168, Acts of 1975, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

VOTED : (Unanimously) That the Town adopt the Town of 

Lincoln Historic District By-Law, establishing an 
Historic District and an Historic District Com- 
mission, pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 40C of the General 
Laws, as amended, copies of which By-Law are on file in the office 
of the Town Clerk and have been distributed to the voters at this 
Town Meeting. 



30 



ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to adopt a map, 

copies of which are available in the office of 
the Town Clerk, establishing an Historic District, under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 40C, General Laws, as most recently amended by- 
Chapter 168, Acts of 1975, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) That the Town establish as part 

of the Historic District under the Lincoln His- 
toric District By-Law, the areas shown on the Lincoln Historic Dis- 
trict Map, copies of which are on file in the office of the Town 
Clerk and have been distributed to the voters at this Town Meeting, 
which Map will be finally prepared in a form suitable for recording 
in the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds. 

ARTICLE 32 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, or any combination thereof, a sum of money for the design of 
a facility for sept age/sludge disposal, and will authorize the appro- 
priate officers of the Town to apply for and accept any grants which 
may become available in connection with such design, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 

ARTICLE 33 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 

Selectmen to petition the General Court permitting 
the Town, by a two-thirds vote of the Town Meeting or otherwise, to 
exceed the mandatory tax rate limits imposed under Question 2 of the 
1980 State Election, otherwise known as "Proposition 2 1/2", or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) To authorize the Selectmen to 

petition the General Court to permit the Town, by 
a two-thirds vote of the Town Meeting, to exceed the mandatory tax 
levy limits imposed under Question 2 of the 1980 State Election, oth- 
erwise known as "Proposition 2 1/2". 



There being no further business to come before the Meeting, it was 
moved, seconded and unanimously voted to adjourn at 5:55 p.m. 



Elizabeth J. Snelling, Town Clerk 



31 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 30, 1981 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting, the polls were declared open at 7:50 a.m. by Town 
Clerk Elizabeth J. Snelling. The following persons assisted Mrs. 
Snelling throughout the day as Wardens: Eugenie Flint, Alice Garri- 
son, Barbara Garrison, John Garrison, William Langton, Kerrie Luce, 
John Ritsher, Beth Sutherland, Howard Snelling, Fred Wilfert and 
Eleanor M. Wilfert. The polls were declared closed at 8 p.m. by 
Mrs. Snelling. There was a total vote of 657 (Precinct 1 - 218; 
Precinct 2 - 459), with the following results: 

Total Votes of 
Both Precincts 



Moderator (5 years) David M. Donaldson 
Blanks 



562 

95 



Town Clerk (1 year) Elizabeth J. Snelling 
Blanks 



599 
58 



Selectman (5 years) Henry M. Morgan 
Blanks 



559 

98 



Treasurer (1 year) Elliott V. Grabill 
Blanks 



533 
124 



Assessor (3 years) 



Douglas M. Burckett 
Blanks 



551 
106 



School Committee (2) 
(3 year terms) 



Elizabeth D. Corcoran 
Paula Bennett 
Timothy P. Hays 
Blanks 



546 
331 
171 
266 



Water Commissioners 
(3 years) 



Stuart B. Avery, Jr, 

Scattering 

Blanks 



511 

1 

145 



Board of Health 
(3 years) 



William B. Stason, M. D. 
Blanks 



540 
117 



Cemetery Commission- 
er (3 years) 



Marjorie L. Holland 
Blanks 



528 
129 



52 



Total Votes of 
Both Precincts 



Planning Board 
(5 years) 



Basil Chigas 
Blanks 



504 
153 



Commissioner of 
Trust Funds 
(3 years) 



William B. Russell 
Blanks 



534 
123 



Trustee of Bemis 
Fund (2 years) 



Amalie M. Kass 
Blanks 



490 
167 



Trustee of Bemis 
Fund (3 years) 



Saville R. 
Blanks 



Davis 



532 
125 



Director, DeCordova 
Museum (4 years) 



Ellen G. Faran 
Dorothy A. Thompson 
Blanks 



247 

315 

95 



Housing Commission 
(3 years) 



Elizabeth J. Snelling 
Blanks 



562 
95 



Recreation 
Committee (3 years) 



Sarah G. Bobbitt 
Blanks 



427 
230 



Tree Warden (1 year) 



Russell L. Barnes 
Blanks 



549 
108 



Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional School 
Committee (2) 
(3 year terms) 



Danta Germanotta 
Alan H. Grathwohl 
Beatrice Nelson 
Blanks 



477 

468 

66 

303 



Elizabeth J. Snelling, Town Clerk 



33 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
June 16, 1981 



Pursuant to a Warrant Duly served, the meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at ^:35 p.m. The 
return of the Warrant was read, and a quorum being present, the fol- 
lowing business was transacted: 

ARTICLE 1 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town Offi- 
cers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

\ Jig) : (Unanimously) That the reports of the Town 

Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees, 

as printed in the 1980 Town Report, be accepted. 

ARTICLI I . see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen 

to petition the General Court for authority to 
convey to the Town of Concord for conservation purposes that portion 
of the Adams Woods, so-called, comprising approximately 55 acres, 
which is situated within the Town of Concord, on the same terms and 
conditions as apply to the Town of Lincoln's present ownership of 
the property, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) That the Selectmen are author: 

to petition the General Court for authority to 
convey to the Town of Concord for conservation purposes that portion 
of the Adams Woods, so-called, comprising approximately 55 acres, 
which is situated within the Town of Concord, on the same terms and 
conditions as apply to the Town of Lincoln's present ownership of the 
property. 

(At this point, Mr. Robert Lemire, who has just retired from the Con- 
servation Commission after many years of dedicated service, most of 
them as Chairman of the Conservation Commission, called attention to 
the fact that the acquisition of this extremely important parcel of 
land, without any impact on the tax rate, is a remarkable achievement, 
Both the many private donors and the Adams family deserve the Ten 
thanks for making this acquisition possible. The Town Meeting sig- 
nified its agreement with this statement with prolonged applause.) 

ARTICLE 5 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to be expended under the 
direction of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee, 
as the Town's share of the apportioned costs for the support of the 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School in lieu of rDpriation of 
53~", 568, approved under Article 5 of the Lincoln Annual Town Meeting 

1981, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 



ARTICLE 4 . To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of 
money to be used by the Police Department to 

provide increased patrols during the summer months, or take any 

other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (Unanimously) That the sum of $9,600 is appro- 

priated for the use of the Police Department to 

provide increased patrols during the summer months, said sum to be 

taken from free cash. 

.ARTICLE 5 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $20,000, or any other sum, for necessary 
repairs to various Town buildings (the Town Hall, the Center School, 
the Library, the Fire and Police Station and the Public Works build- 
ing), and to determine if said sum shall be raised by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by a combination of 
those methods, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the sum of $10,000 is appropriated for re- 

pairs to various Town buildings (the Town Hall, 
the Center School, the Library, the Fire and Police Station and the 
Public Works building), said sum to be taken from free cash. 

(The original motion under Article 5 asked for the sum of $20,000. 
However, a motion from the floor amended this figure to $10,000, and 
the amendment was adopted by a vote of 205 in favor, with 174 opposed. 
The main motion was then adopted by a majority voice vote.) 

At this point, the Moderator, Mr. Donaldson, called attention to the 
fact that Mr. Sumner Smith is retiring this year as a member of the 
Historical Commission. This, therefore, marks the end of 65 years 
of public service, a record which will probably never be broken. 
During those 65 years, Mr. Smith has served as a Water Commissioner 
for many years, a Selectman for fifteen years, and as a member of a 
number of miscellaneous committees, culminating with his terms as a 
member of the Historical Commission. The Town Meeting signified 
its appreciation of Mr. Smith's extraordinary record by a rising vote 
of thanks, together with enthusiastic and prolonged applause. 

Mr. Donaldson then announced that the next order of business will be 
discussion and action on Articles 6, 7 and 11 (which will be taken up 
out of order). He further stated that, in order to avoid any possi- 
ble conflict of interest, Mr. William N. Swift will act as Moderator 
for these three articles, while Mrs. Snelling (the Town Clerk), who 
is also Chairman of the Housing Commission, will be replaced by the 
Assistant Town Clerk, Mrs. Nancy J. Zuelke. Accordingly these 
changes took place, and the following transpired: 

ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for the 

purpose of providing housing for persons of low 
and moderate income and others whose needs may be identified from time 

55 



to time, by purchase, eminent domain, or any other way, all or part 
of two parcels of land, one owned by the Rural Land Foundation of 
Lincoln and shown outlined in red on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in 
Lincoln, Massachusetts'", dated July 11, 1979, and revised February, 
1981, by Cleverdon, Varney £ Pike, Consulting Engineers, on file in 
the office of the Town Clerk, and the other owned by Heirs of R. D. 
Donaldson and shown outlined in red on a plan entitled "Preliminary 
Plan of Land in Lincoln", dated March 1, 1978, by Cleverdon, Varney 
§ Pike, Consulting Engineers, on file in the office of the Town 
Clerk; to authorize the Town to sell as condominiums a portion of 
the parcels as part of an overall scheme to benefit persons of low 
and moderate income and others; to authorize the Lincoln Housing Com- 
mission, on behalf of the Town, to do all things necessary for the 
development of rental and other housing for said purpose on all or 
part of said parcels, including the sale as condominiums of a portion 
of the development as part of an overall scheme to benefit persons of 
low and moderate income and others; to lease part or all of said 
parcels to the Lincoln Housing Commission or its designee; for those 
purposes to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500,000, by borrowing, 
by taxation, or by any combination of those methods, and to issue 
bonds or notes, or any combination thereof, in an amount not in ex- 
cess of $2,500,000, or to take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (The following motion was defeated by a vote of 

194 in favor, with 245 opposed) 
That the Town vote to acquire for the purpose 
of providing housing for persons of low and mod- 
erate income and others whose needs may be identified from time to 
time, all or part of two parcels of land, one owned by the Rural 
Land Foundation of Lincoln, and shown outlined in red on a plan en- 
titled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts:, dated July 11, 1979, 
and revised February, 1981, by Cleverdon, Varney & Pike, Consulting 
Engineers, on file in the office of the Town Clerk, and the other 
owned by Heirs of R. D. Donaldson, and shown outlined in red on a 
plan entitled "Preliminary Plan of Land in Lincoln", dated March 1, 
1978, by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, Consulting Engineers, on file in 
the office of the Town Clerk; to authorize the Town to sell as con- 
dominiums a portion of the parcels as part of an overall scheme to 
benefit persons of low and moderate income and others; to authorize 
the Lincoln Housing Commission, on behalf of the Town, to do all 
things necessary for the development of rental and other housing for 
said purpose on all or part of said parcels, including the sale as 
condominiums of a portion of the development as part of an overall 
scheme to benefit persons of low and moderate income and others; to 
lease part or all of said parcels to the Lincoln Housing Commission 
or its designee; for those purposes to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $2,500,000; and for those purposes the sum of $2,500,000 is hereby 
appropriated, and the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 

56 



is authorized to borrow said sum under the provisions of Chapter 359 
of the Acts of 1979, and to issue bonds and notes of the Town there- 
for, payable in accordance with said Chapter 359. 

ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will vote to change from an 
R--1 Single Family Residence District to an R-2 
General Residence District the two parcels of land described below, 
and to amend the Zoning Map of the Town to reflect those changes, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

(a) a certain parcel of land owned by the Rural Land 
Foundation of Lincoln and shown outlined in red 
on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, 
Massachusetts", dated July 11, 1979, and revised 
February, 1981, by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, Con- 
sulting Engineers; and 

(b) a certain parcel of land owned by the Heirs of 
R. D. Donaldson and shown outlined in red on a 
plan entitled "Preliminary Plan of Land in Lin- 
coln", dated March 1, 1978, by Cleverdon, Varney 
§ Pike, Consulting Engineers. 

(Both plans are on file in the office of the Town Clerk.) 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 

By consent of the Town Meeting, Article 11 was then considered out of 
order, in order that all matters pertaining to the Umbrello land might 
be considered together. 

ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for con- 
servation purposes, by purchase, eminent domain, 
or any other way, a parcel of land owned by the Rural Land Foundation 
of Lincoln, containing 14.5 acres> more or less, as shown outlined 
in red on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts", 
dated July 11, 1979, and revised February, 1981, by Cleverdon, Varney 
§ Pike, Consulting Engineers, on file in the office of the Town Clerk; 
and for that purpose to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxa- 
tion, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any com- 
bination of those methods, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (The following motion was defeated by a vote of 

136 in favor, with 238 opposed.) 
That the Selectmen be authorized in the name and 
on behalf of the Town to acquire for conservation 
purposes, by purchase, eminent domain, or any other way, a parcel of 
land owned by the Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln, containing 14.5 
acres, more or less, as shown outlined in red on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts", dated July 11, 1979, and 

37 



revised February, 1981, by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, Consulting 
Engineers, on file in the office of the Town Clerk; and for that 
purpose the sum of $90,000 is hereby appropriated, of which $5,000 
is to be taken from free cash, and $85,000 is to be borrowed under 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7 (3); and the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to 
issue bonds and notes of the Town for said sum, payable in accordance 
with the provisions of said Chapter 44. 

At 11:45 p.m., at the conclusion of the action under Article 11, it 
was voted to adjourn the Town Meeting until Thursday, June 18, 1981, 
at 7:30 p.m. 

ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
June 18, 1981 

The adjourned session of the Special Town Meeting was called 
to order by the Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 7:40 p.m. A 
quorum being present, the following business was transacted: 

ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will ratify and confirm the 

action of the Selectmen in entering into an 
agreement with the Lincoln Foundation, Inc., by the terms of which 
the proceeds of the rental of the Lunt and Campobasso houses col- 
lected by the Foundation from 1970 through December 31, 1979, were 
disposed of by a payment of $10,000 to the Town for necessary re- 
pairs to and maintenance of those houses; $5,000 to the Town for its 
general funds pursuant to the 1970 agreement between the Town and the 
Foundation; and the balance to be retained by the Foundation for its 
charitable purposes and as recompense to it for its role in managing 
those two properties for a ten (10) year period; and to see if the 
Town will authorize the Selectmen to enter into an agreement with 
the Lincoln Housing Commission for the management, including leasing, 
repairs and maintenance of those two houses, on such terms and con- 
ditions as the Selectmen shall determine; or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Unanimously) To ratify and confirm the 

action of the Selectmen in entering into an agree- 
ment with the Lincoln Foundation, Inc., by terms of which the pro- 
ceeds of the rental of the Lunt and Campobasso houses, collected by 
the Foundation from 1970 through December 31, 1980, are to be dis- 
posed of by a payment of $10,000 to the Town for necessary repairs 
to and maintenance of those houses; $5,000 to the Town for its gener- 
al funds pursuant to the 19 70 agreement between the Town and the 
Foundation; and the balance to be retained by the Foundation for its 
charitable purposes and as recompense to it for its role in managing 
those two properties for a ten (10) year period; and that the Select- 
men are authorized to enter into an agreement with the Lincoln Hous- 

38 



ing Commission for the management, including leasing, repairs and 
maintenance of those two houses, on such terms and conditions as the 
Selectmen shall determine. 

ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote 

taken under Article 2 of the Special Town Meeting 
on November 5, 1979, whereby the sum of $36,890, to be received from 
the Commonwealth, was appropriated for general highway purposes, by 
appropriating said $36,890 towards the costs associated with the lay- 
ing out and construction of a portion of Bedford Road, as shown on a 
preliminary plan presently on file in the office of the Town Clerk; 
to acquire necessary easements or interests in fee by eminent domain, 
purchase, or any other way, from private owners wherever shown on 
said plan; and to raise and appropriate a sum of money to cover the 
additional cost of this project, by taxation, by transfer from avail- 
able funds, by borrowing, or by any combination thereof; or take any 
other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (The motion under this article was defeated by 

a majority voice vote. The motion was as fol- 
lows:) 

That the vote taken under Article 2 of the Special 
Town Meeting on November 5, 1979, namely: "That 
the sum of $36,890 be appropriated for the construction, reconstruc- 
tion and for maintenance and repairs of roads and bridges, and the 
enforcement of traffic laws, as requested by the Board of Selectmen, 
to be reimbursed by the Commonwealth under Chapter 480, Acts of 1979, 
and Chapter 356, Acts of 1977", is amended by appropriating said 
$36,890 towards the costs associated with the laying out and con- 
struction of a portion of Bedford Road, as shown on a preliminary 
plan presently on file in the office of the Town Clerk; to acquire 
necessary easements or interests in fee by purchase or gift from pri- 
vate owners wherever shown on said plan; and for those purposes the 
additional sum of $75,000 is appropriated, and the Treasurer, with 
approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under 
Section 6A of Chapter 44 in anticipation of reimbursement from the 
Commonwealth. 

ARTICLE 10 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $645,000, or any other sum, by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any 
combination thereof, said sum to be used by the Water Commissioners 
to construct a covered reservoir with associated pipes, fixtures, and 
other equipment, on land off Bedford Road; or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : (By a vote of 240 in favor, with 12 opposed.) 

That the Water Commissioners are authorized to 
construct a concrete reservoir at the location of 

39 



the existing open water distribution reservoir off Bedford Road, to- 
gether with associated pipes, fixtures and other equipment; that the 
sum of $700,000 is appropriated therefor; and that to meet such appro- 
priation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is auth- 
orized to borrow the sum of $700,000 under the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8 (4), and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor, payable in accordance with said Chapter 44. 

(For action under Article 11, refer to the first session of the 
Special Town Meeting, since this Article was taken up immediately 
following action on Article 7.) 

ARTICLE 12 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a 

sum of money to be added to the amounts appro- 
priated under Article 32 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting 
on March 25, 1978, and Article 29 of the Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting on March 27, 1979, for the laying out and the construction 
of a bicycle path on Concord Road (Route 126), from its intersection 
with South Great Road (Route 117) to Baker Bridge Road, as shown on 
a preliminary plan prepared by the Middlesex County Engineering De- 
partment, presently on file with the Town Clerk and available for 
inspection; to determine if said sum shall be raised by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
thereof; and that the appropriate officials are authorized to apply 
to the Commonwealth to obtain reimbursement of a part of the cost of 
said bicycle path; or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Adopted by a count of 235 in favor, with 10 

opposed.) 

That the sum of $96,000 is raised and appropriated 
to be added to the amounts appropriated under 
Articles 32 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting on March 25, 
1978, and under Article 29 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting 
on March 27, 1979, totaling $21,275, for the laying cut and con- 
struction of a bicycle path on Concord Road, Route 126, from its in- 
tersection with South Great Road, Route 117, to Baker Bridge Road, or 
such shorter distance as the Planning Board may determine; that to 
meet said appropriation the sum of $10,000 is appropriated from free 
cash to be added to said sum of $21,275 heretofore appropriated; and 
that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized 
to borrow the sum of $86,000 under the provisions of Chapter 44, 
Section 7 (5) of the General Laws, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor, in accordance with the provisions of said Chapter 44; 
provided, however, that the borrowing authorization provided above 
shall be contingent upon a grant by the Commonwealth of funds to pay 
75% of the total cost of the project, in accordance with an applica- 
tion which has been filed with the Department of Public Works; and 
that said votes under Article 52 of the Warrant for the Annual Town 

40 



Meeting on March 25, 1978, and under Article 29 of the Warrant for 
the Annual Town Meeting on March 27, 1979, are amended to eliminate 
the contingency thereto set forth, so that the sums appropriated 
under said Articles may be expended by the Town to prepare engineer- 
ing drawings for said path for submission to the Department of Public 
Works in connection with the grant application. 

ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 
9.1 of the Zoning By-Law, B-l Retail Business 
District, Uses Permitted, to allow the temporary exterior display 
and sale of merchandise subject to the approval of the Planning 
Board; or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Adopted by a count of 235 in favor, with 6 

opposed.) 

That Section 9.1 (a) of the Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Lincoln is hereby amended by inserting 
"except as hereinafter provided in subparagraph (h) below" after the 
words "within a building" in the second line of said section, and 
by adding subparagraph (h) to Section 9.1, as follows: 

"(h) Retail establishments may, subject to such con- 
ditions as the Planning Board may impose, con- 
duct outdoor sales periodically pursuant to a 
plan, including a site plan, submitted to and 
approved by the Planning Board, showing the 
area in which the sale is to take place, the 
proposed dates and hours of operation, and any 
other pertinent facts." 

As amended, Section 9.1 (a) would read as follows: 

(a) Store for retail sale of merchandise where 

all display and sales are conducted within a 
building, except as hereinafter provided in 
subparagraph (h) below, and where no signifi- 
cant manufacturing, assembly or packaging occur 
on the premises. 

ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will vote to forward the fol- 
lowing resolution to the elected representatives 

of the Town: 

"Be it resolved, that, in order to promote peace 
and to reduce the threat of nuclear war, we call 

upon the governments of the United States and the Soviet Union to 

adopt an immediate nuclear weapons moratorium."; 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (By an overwhelming majority voice vote.) 

41 



That the Town of Lincoln.. Massachusetts, for- 
ward the following resolution to the elected 

representatives of the Town: 

"Be it resolved, that, in order to promote 
peace and to reduce the threat of nuclear war, 

we call upon the governments of the United States and the Soviet 

Union to adopt an immediate nuclear weapons moratorium as a first 

step towards world wide nuclear disarmament." 

(The words "as a first step towards world wide nuclear disarmament" 
were added as an amendment to the original motion and were unani- 
mously adopted.) 



There being no further business to come before the Town Meeting, it 
was unanimously voted to adjourn at 10:20 p.m. 



Elizabeth J. Snelling, Town Clerk 



42 



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J4 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 



Julia A. Bemis $ 300.00 

William W. Benjamin 500.00 

Marie H. Bisbee 200.00 

Mildred E. Bowles 200.00 

Agnes L. Brown 300.00 

George Browning 200.00 

Sarah J. Browning 200.00 

Elizabeth G. Chapin 300.00 

Robert B. Chapin 300.00 

William N. Costello 100.00 

Mary H. Cushing 100.00 

Anthony J. Doherty 500.00 

Paul Dorian 150.00 

Charles P. Farnsworth 350.00 

Edward R. Farrar 300.00 

Francis Flint 250.00 

Orila J. Flint 300.00 

Donald Gordon 300.00 

Raymond E. Haggerty 150.00 

George Harrington 100.00 

Samuel Hartwell 300.00 

Thomas Huddleston 200.00 

Abijah G. Jones 300.00 

M. Gertrude Kelley 300.00 

John J. Kelliher 200.00 

Byron Lunt 300.00 

Gardner Moore 300.00 

Lena M. Newell 325.00 

Joa Pacewicz 400.00 

John H. Pierce 500.00 

Anne D. Pollard 300.00 

Charles 0. Preble 100.00 

Annie A. Ray 300.00 

Mary Susan Rice 87.27 

E. H. Rogers 250.00 
Mary James Scripture 500.00 
Eugene Sherman 200.00 
Charles S. Smith 300.00 
J. Waldo Smith 300.00 
Webster Smith 300.00 
Helen 0. Storrow 2,000.00 
George G. Tarbell 400.00 
Laura B. $ Arthur E. Thiessen 500.00 
Maria L. Thompson 500.00 
Mabel H. Todd 200.00 
Ellen T. Trask 200.00 
Albert Washburn 500.00 
Elizabeth S. Wheeler 200.00 
Ellen F. Whitney 100.00 
Lewis W. Woodworth 150.00 
J. S. Wible 100.00 

F. B. Sargent 200.00 



$15,912.27 



45 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND 

Perpetual Care Funds ( See previous page) $ 15,912.27 

Perpetual Care Fund income accumulated at 7/1/80 13,784.88 
Income received 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 3,028.52 

Less payments, per Cemetery Commissioners 11,096. 91 
Accumulated income at 6/30/81 5,726.49 



Cash and investments at June 30. 1981 



TOTAL 



LINCOLN STABILIZATION FUND 
Cash Account 



TOTAL $ 21,638.76 



Middlesex Institution for Savings $ 5,726.49 

Middlesex Institution for Savings Investment Certificate 
to mature 8/14/81 15,912.27 



$ 21,638.76 



Cash Balance July 1, 1980 
Interest income 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Cash Balance at June 30, 1981 



Cash and Investments at June 30, 1981 

Bay Bank/Middlesex $ 32.71 

MMDT - Composite Trust Fund 376.86 

TOTAL $ 409.57 



$ 


32.71 
20.45 


53.16 

20.45 


$ 


32.71 





46 



OUTSTANDING DEBT AT JUNE 30, 1981 

70,000 School Project Loan, 2.90%, due $35,000, each November 15, 1981-82 
issued under the Acts of 1948 

10,000 School Project Loan, 3.10%, due $5,000. each November 15, 1981-82 
issued under the Acts of 1948 

180,000 School Project Loan, 4.00%, due $45,000. each April 1, 1982-85, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 



260,000 Total School Loans 



5,000 Conservation Loan, 3.50%, due $5,000. March 1, 1982, issued under 
Chapter 44, General Laws 

40,000 Swimming Pool Loan, 4.6%, due $10,000. each April 1, 1982-85 

20,000 Sanitation Land Loan, 4.7%, due $10,000. each April 1, 1982-83, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

12,500 Codman Kitchen Loan, 5.75%, due $2,500. each July 1, 1981-85 

240,000 Conservation Land Loan, 4.-5%, due $20,000. each April 1, 1982-93; 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

40,000 Codman Bam Complex Loan, 5.50%, due $5,000. each Sept. 15, 1981-S 



357,500 Total Municipal Loans 



617,500 NET DEBT 



15,000 Water Loan, 5.50%, due $5,000. each June 15, 1981-84 

160,000 Water Loan, 5.20%, due $15,000. each August 1, 1981-1990 

135,000 Water Loan, 4.65%, due $15,000. each April 1, 1982-1990 

36,000 Water Loan, 5.25%, due $12,000. each April 1, 1982-84 

6,000 Water Loan, 5.25%, due $2,000. each April 1, 1982-84 



352,000 Total Water Loans 



969,500 TOTAL DEBT 



47 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Betty L. Lang 

REVENUE 
July 1, 1980 - June 30, 1981 

Current Taxes 

Personal $ 140,760.62 

Real Estate 3,694,781.56 

Prior Years ' Taxes 

Personal 149.50 

Real Estate 57,045.50 

From State Local Aid Fund 

School Aid, Ch. 70 253,704.00 

Lottery 33,821.00 

Loss of Taxes on Public Land 60,964.82 

Real Estate Abatements for Elderly 2,939.01 

Local Aid Fund 65,496.00 

In Lieu of Taxes 

Carroll School 3,000.00 

Massachusetts Port Authority 27,500.00 

U. S. Dept. of Interior 23,044.00 



Grants $ Gifts - Federal 

Revenue Sharing, P.L. 92-512 72,504.00 

Air Force School 2,105,911.00 

Grants from State 
School 

Transportation 63,448.00 

Building Assistance 37,393.58 

Food Service 6,531.92 

Metco - Chapter 506 195,852.00 

Title I 2,325.00 

Title III ABE 39,220.00 

Title IVB ESEA 1,964.00 

Title IVC 58,831.00 

Title VI 43,280.00 

Energy Reimbursement 1 ,280.00 



Other 




Highway Aid 


46,634.00 


Library Aid 


3,187.00 


Dept. of Elderly Affairs 


1,000.00 


Conservation Receipts 


242,000.00 



$3,835,542.18 



57,195.00 



416,924.83 



53,544.00 



Fines 

District Court 26,384.40 

Licenses d, Permits 

Licenses 702.00 

Permits 33,303.35 



34,005.35 



2,178,415.00 



450,125.50 



292,821.00 



48 



Grants from County- 
Dog Fund 



1,204.68 



Codman Trustees 


22,856.25 




Adams Woods Contributions 


300,380.89 




Dial Project 


2,237.00 




Roadside Program 


210.00 




Emergency Assistance Fund 


8,142.50 


333,826.64 


Motor Vehicle Excise 






1981 


115,814.53 




1980 


94,779.26 




Prior Years 


5,494.94 


216,088.73 


General Government 






Selectmen 


659.72 




Treasurer § Collector 


4,199.00 




Assessors 


189.14 




Town Clerk 


1,553.25 




Planning Board 


250.00 




Board of Appeals 


900.00 




Conservation 


80.50 




Town Hall Rental 


20.00 




Center School Rental 


12,425.00 




Codman Rental 


3,630.00 


23,906.6 


Public Safety 






Accident Reports 


721.00 




Firearms I.D. 


58.00 




Ambulance Fees 


5,680.08 




Alarm Assessments 


100.00 




Sealer of Weights § Measures 


270.60 




Building Inspector 


2.25 


6,831.9 


Health £ Sanitation 






Garbage Collections 


14,481.25 




Dog Clinic 


213.00 





Highway 




Sale of Surplus Material 




School 




Tuitions 


4,350.00 


Rentals 


5,080.00 


Lunch Program 


6,287.86 


Air Force School Cafeteria 


43,944.66 


Library 




Fines 


3,182.38 


Lost Books 


309.16 


Sale of Books 


30.48 


Copy Machine 


1,727.30 



14,694.25 
2,406.45 



59,662.52 



5,249.32 



49 



Recreation 

Summer Day Camp 
Square Dance 
Tennis Stickers 

Youth Committee 

After School Sports 

Dances 

Movies 

Special Events 

Cemetery 

Sale of Lots 
Interments 
Foundations 
Sale of Loam 

Unclassified 

Employee Insurance Reimbursements 
Air Force School 
Metco 

Interest 
On Deposits 
On Taxes 

On Motor Vehicle Excise 
On Investments 
On Revenue Sharing 
On Cemetery Fund 
On Adams Woods Contributions 

Agency, Trust § Investment 
Dog Licenses due County 
Care and Custody of Dogs 
Fish 5 Game Licenses 
Deputy Collector 
Grammar School Fund 
DeCordova School Equipment Fund 
Agency Account, Police Detail 
Agency Account, Conservation 



Agency Account, Swimming Pool 

Agency Account, Pierce House 

Agency Account, Day Camp Special Needs 

Agency Account, Campers' Insurance 

Agency Account, Codman Community Farm 2 

Agency Account, Insurance Settlements 1 

Agency Account, DPK Barn Fire Insurance 10 

Agency Account, School Custodian 

Agency Account, School Field Trips 5 

Agency Account, Air Force School 

Field Trips 
Agency Account, Ambulance Billing 
Agency Account, Housing Commission 1 
Agency Account, Fire Association 
Tailings 

Employee Deductions 
Surplus Cash Investments 



14,637.00 
103.50 
365.00 



4,335.00 
740.60 
293.85 
150.00 



10,111.50 

1,055.00 

91.25 

450.00 



62,656.34 
795.24 



74,412.14 

10,875.76 

1,836.03 

144,695.01 

2,846.36 

452.42 

5,225.83 



,080.80 

222.00 

,588.50 

,494.40 

58.43 

,378.67 

,850.77 

,668.50 

,383.36 

,310.89 

346.00 

476.00 

,062.59 

,466.50 

,000.00 

932.05 

,719.63 



168.50 



419 

10,965 



225.00 
,375.00 

100.00 

21.82 

,592.08 

,000.00 



15,105.50 



5,519.45 



11,707.75 



63,451.58 



240,343.55 



11,506,521.49 



50 



Refunds 5,598.68 

Municipal Indebtedness 

Temporary Loans 976,000.00 

Payment in Anticipation of Adams 

Woods Pledges 115,906.18 

1,089,906.18 

Total, General Receipts 20,946,982.57 

Cash Balance, July 1, 1980 

General 553,516.46 

Federal Revenue Sharing 53,758. 90 

607,275.36 

21,554,257.93 
Water Receipts 

Water Rates 176,168.81 

Water Connections 24,875.00 

Hydrant Service 40,000.00 

Late Charges 521.00 

Miscellaneous 200.00 

Insurance Settlement 907.00 

Frozen Pipes 918.05 

243,589.86 

Water Cash Balance, July 1, 1980 (9,603.46) 



233,986.40 
Total Revenue and Cash on Hand 21,788,244.33 



SI 



EXPENDITURES 
July 1, 1980 - June 30, 1981 



General Government 
Selectmen 
Finance Committee 
Town Office 
Assessors 
Legal 

Town Clerk 

Election £ Registration 
Planning Board 
Planning Board Traffic Study, 

Art. #16 (80-81) 
Board of Appeals 
Conservation, Land Management 
Conservation, Planning § Administ 
Umbrello Temp. Loan Interest, 

Art. #4 (79-80) 
Umbrello Temp. Loan Interest, 

Art. #10 (81-82) 
Adams Land Purchase, Art. #5 (79- 
Consulting £ Engineering 
Tree Warden 
Roadside Program 
Town Hall 
Center School Operation § Main., 

Art. #4 (80-81) 



$ 1,719.40 

60.00 

197,499.65 

16,275.22 

16,524.02 

342.66 

6,100.55 

8,479.40 

110.50 

342.82 

67,815.00 

ration 11,276.55 



1,089.67 

2,909.64 

583,500.00 

14,625.65 

45.00 

7,247.09 

8,266.58 

19,812.60 



80) 



Protection of Persons 5 Property 

Police Department 255,050.56 

Fire Department 223,866.58 

Ambulance 6,866.70 

Communications 63,595.88 

Civil Defense 352.46 

Fire & Police Building 15,509.35 

Building Inspector 32,064.60 

Town Building Repairs, Art. #26 (79-80) 1,779.22 

Town Building Repairs, Art. #18 (80-81) 11,873.90 

Sealer of Weights § Measures 1 , 196. 07 



Health & Sanitation 
Board of Health 
Garbage Collection 
Animal Officer 
Council on Aging 
COA Dept. of Elder Affairs Grant 
Emergency Assistance Fund 
Minutcman Home Care 
Housing Commission, Art. #1 (79-80) 



29,243.52 

14,100.00 

12,130.34 

7,085.18 

1,000.00 

1,682.49 

198.00 

680.99 



964,042.00 



612,155.32 



66,120.52 



52 



Public Works 

Salaries & Expense 366,210.89 

Public Works Building 13,064.22 
Sanitary Land Fill Cover Material 

Art. #22 (80-81) 23,800.00 

Concord Rd. Bike Path, Art. #32 (78-79) 674.66 
South Great Rd. Bike Path, Art. #29 

(75-76) 572.20 
Public Works Equipment, Art. #19 

(80-81) 27,055.00 
DPW Barn Fire Damage, Art. #1 (80-81) 10,000.00 

441,376.97 

Veterans' Services 1,632.80 

Education 

Elementary Schools 1,979,095.00 

Energy Audit, Art. #11 (80-81) 4,000.00 
Smith School Renovations, Art. #14 

(80-81) 85,943.50 

Metco - Chapter 506 105,793.39 

Regional High School 591,609.46 

Vo-Tech High School 59,822.00 

Air Force School 2,124,568.58 

Air Force School Cafeteria 52,171.99 

School Lunch Program 12,544.96 

Title III ABE 42,058.46 

Title IVB ESEA 1,925.01 

Title IVC ESEA 56,116.00 

Title VIB 44,388.23 

Title I 4,250.00 

Title IVC 3,000.00 

School Field Trips 5,801.30 

5,173,087.88 



Library 






Salaries 




106,702.79 


Expense 




37,594.23 


Library Building 




17,370.34 


Copy Machine 




1,832.80 


Exterior Repairs, 


Art. #8 (77-78) 


210.99 


Recreation 






Salaries 




21,017.52 


Expense 




7,305.81 


New Tennis Courts 


, Art. #28 (78-79) 


357.30 



163,711.15 



28,680.63 

Youth Committee 

Salaries § Expense 14,109.32 

Cemetery 

Interments 222.52 

Maintenance (j Expense 9,894.74 

Mainte § Improvement of Cemeteries, 

Art. #2 (79-80) 7,500.00 

17,617.26 



53 



Town Debt Service 

Serial Bonds 197,500.00 

Interest on Serial Bonds 33,940.00 

Temporary Loans 988,000.00 

Interest on Temporary Loans 4,320.74 
Payment in Anticipation of Adams Woods 

Pledges 109,068.39 



Unclassified 

Middlesex County Pension Fund 

Employee Hospital § Insurance Fund 

Property 5 Indemnity Insurance 

Town Reports £ Town Meeting Expense 

Celebration Committee 

Historical Commission 

Maintenance To Codman Complex 

Fireworks, Art. #24 (80-81) 

Pierce House Repairs, Art. #17 (80-81) 

Refunds 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Real Estate 

Other 

Agency, Trust § Investments 
Fish § Game Licenses 
Dog Licenses due County 
Agency Account, Police Detail 
Agency Account, Pierce House 
Agency Account, Deputy Collector 
Agency Account, Conservation 
Agency Account, Swimming Pool 
Agency Account, Day Camp Special Needs 
Day Camp Insurance 
Codman Community Farm 
Center School Rental 
Smith School Rental 
Agency Account, School Custodian 
Agency Account, Insurance Settlements 
Agency Account, Ambulance Billing 
Agency Account, Fire Department 
Agency Account, Roadside Committee 
Kendall Foundation 
Adams U'oods Cent ribut ion 
Employee Deductions 
Court Judgments 
Surplus Cash Investment 10 



Agency Account 
Agency Account 
Agency Account 
Agency Account 



117,937.00 

110,483.72 

77,652.60 

4,012.59 

2,223.01 

664.13 

417.66 

5,000.00 

30,448.00 



5,961.62 

21,540.10 

505.20 



1,592.95 

1,642.55 

22,098.35 

30,310.89 

2,929.40 

10,739.98 

21,482.79 

294.10 

508.00 

2,236.44 

1,420.21 

226.47 

1,150.08 

534.84 

225.00 

100.00 

250.00 

3, 095.10 

3,590.30 

417,164.26 

54.03 

915,000.00 



State 6 County Assessments 

State Recreation Areas 40,981.67 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 786.75 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 956.10 
Metropolitan Air Pollution Control Dist. 1,020.90 

Mass. Bay Tranportation Authority 139,219.78 

County Tax 182,994.78 



1,332,829.13 



348,838.71 



28,006.92 



11,436,625.74 



365,959.98 



54 



Total Expenditures 20,994,794.33 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1981 

General 509,174.34 

Federal Revenue Sharing 59,109.26 

568,283.60 

21,563,077.93 

Water Department 

Salaries . 225.00 

Wages 48,620.95 

Expense 80,090.75 

Bonds 49,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 19,725.00 

Refunds 504.60 

Water System Study, Art. #1 (80-81) 21,591.00 

Water Freezeups 720.00 

Water Insurance Settlements 587.42 

221,064.72 

Water Cash Balance, June 30, 1981 4,101.68 

225,166.40 

Total Expenditures and Cash on Hand 21,788,244.33 

REVENUE SHARING EXPENDITURES 
July 1, 1980 - June 30, 1981 

Revenue Sharing Funds 

Police Department, Salaries $ 70,000.00 

Revenue Sharing reports and supporting documentation may be examined by the 
general public in the office of the Town Accountant, Center School. 



37. 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1981 
GENERAL ACCOUNTS 





Assets 










Cash: 












General 




$ 690 


,460.07 






General Revenue Sharing 




59 


,109.26 






Water 




10 


,033.95 


$ 759,603. 


,28 


Surplus Cash Investments 








900,000, 


00 


Advances for Petty Cash 












Collector 






20.00 






Treasurer 






225.00 






Town Office 






25.00 






Town Clerk 






25.00 






Police 






25.00 






School Administration 






50.00 






School Instruction 






225.00 






Air Force School 






225.00 






Air Force School Cafeteria 






30.00 






Library 






75.00 






Recreation 






100.00 


1,025, 


,00 



Real Estate 

Real Estate 

Real Estate 
Personal Property 



Accounts Receivable: 

Taxes 

Levy of 1978-79, 

Levy of 1979-80 : 

Levy of 1980-81 , 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Levy of 1975 
Levy of 1976 
Levy of 1977 
Levy of 1978 
Levy of 1979 
Levy of 1980 
Levy of 1981 

Tax Titles 



Departmental 

Board of Health Garbage Collection 
Veterans' Benefits 

Water 
Rates 
Connections 



10,483.18 

19,918.39 

89,971.61 
10.12 



120,383.30 



Aid to Highways 
Contract 29634 
Contract 29894 



1,359.60 






1,326.50 






1,245.56 






1,581.61 






3,348.17 






5,771,71 






18,947.96 


33,581, 


,11 




10,088, 


,23 


296.00 






624.40 


920, 


40 


10,296.40 






1,000.00 


11,296, 


.40 


4,291.24 






22,436.00 


26,727, 


,24 



56 



Agency 



School Custodian Detail 
Codman Community Farm 


198.03 
616.20 




814 


.23 


Water Receipts (to be Collected) 1980-81: 






961 


.54 


Loans Authorized: 










Land Acquisition 
Water Dept. Equipment 
Farrar Pond Well 
Reservoir Cover 


78,837.79 

80,000.00 

275,000.00 

700,000.00 


1,133 


,837, 


.79 


Unprovided for or Overdrawn Accounts : 










Underestimates 1980-81 
State 
MBTA 
Special Education 


119.78 
3,412.00 


3. 


,531, 


.78 


County Tax 




3 


,944, 


.73 



Overlay Deficits 
Levy of 1975-76 
Levy of 1977-78 

Court Judgments 

Revenue 1981-82: 

Transfers Several Accounts 1981-82: 

Water Receipts (to be Collected) 1981-82: 

Debt Accounts 
Assets 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 

Inside Debt Limit 
General 



9.39 




1,996.60 


2,005.99 




54.03 




4,931,056.77 




311,501.98 




203,163.00 



$ 8,454,496.80 



357,500.00 



Outside Debt Limit 
General 
Public Service Enterprise 



TOTAL 



260,000.00 

352,000.00 612,000.00 

$ 9,423,996.80 



57 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1981 
GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
Liabilities and Reserves 



Warrants Payable: 

General 
Water 



$ 181,285.73 
5,932.27 



Temporary Loans : 

In Anticipation of Serial Loans 

Payment in Anticipation of Adams Woods Pledges: 

Payroll Deductions: 
Life Insurance 
Blue Cross Blue Shield 
Washington National Insurance Co. 
Annuity Programs 



Agency : 

Dog Licenses due County 
Deputy Collector 
Police Detail 
Garland Cabin 
Conservation Commission 
Insurance Settlements 
Day Camp, Special Needs 
Campers' Insurance 
Swimming Pool 
Cc Iman Trustees 
Housing Commission 

Tailing: 

Unclaimed Checks: 

Trust Fund Income: 

DeCordova School Equipment Fund 
Grammar School Fund 

Federal Grants: 



School 






Title 


I P 


.L. 89-313 


Title 


III 


ABE 


Title 


IVB 


ESEA 1979 


Title 


IVB 


ESEA 1980 


Title 


IVB 


ESEA 1981 


Title 


VIB 


P.L. 94-142 



Air Force School 

Revolving Funds: 
Lunch Program 

Air Force School Cafeteria 
Chapter 506 Metco 
Field Trips 



1,229.03 

11,581.83 

145.26 

8,000.00 



736.55 

550.00 

496.96 

5,553.74 

13,909.66 

1,732.88 

330.80 

336.00 

9,464.12 

3,218.75 

1,375.00 



$ 187,218.00 

74,000.00 
4,837.79 



20,954.12 



37,704.46 



3,292.12 



2,974.56 






75.35 


3,049 


.91 


200.00 






97.41 






21.22 






6.41 






897,77 






4,947.78 






192,035.53 


198,206, 


.12 


6,019.12 






9,214.49 






94,220.60 






222.32 


109,676, 


,55 



58 



Gifts: 



Dial Program 




342.42 






Conservation 




904.90 






Emergency Assistance Fund 




6,460.01 


7,689. 


33 


Appropriation Balances: 










General Water 




238,934.22 






Water 




11,275.92 


250,210, 


14 


Loans Authorized and Unissued: 






1,055,000. 


,00 


Overestimates 1980-81: 










State 










Recreation Areas 




554.05 






Metro. Air Pollution Control District 


256.18 


810. 


,23 


Receipts Reserved for Appropriation: 










County Dog Fund 




1,204.68 






Dog Care and Custody 




322.00 






Cemetery Improvement Fund 




11,019.29 






In Lieu of Taxes 




54,344.72 






State Aid 










Conservation Receipts 




8,900.03 






Library 




3,187.00 


78,977, 


,72 


Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus: 






40,251, 


,16 


Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 










Levy of 1978-79 




27,234.57 






Levy of 1979-80 




15,517.49 






Levy of 1980-81 




26,945.94 


69,698, 


,00 


Revenue Reserved until Collected: 










Motor Vehicle Excise 




33,581.11 






Tax Title 




10,088.23 






Departmental 




920.40 






Water 




11,296.40 






Aid to Highways 




26,727.24 


82,613, 


,38 


Reserve for Petty Cash Advances: 






1,025, 


.00 


Surplus Revenue: 










General 




512,773.78 






Federal Revenue Sharing 




59,109.26 


571,883, 


,04 


Appropriation Control 1981-82: 






5,278.065, 


.25 


Appropriation Control Special Articles 


1981-82 




176,171, 


,50 


Appropriation Control Water 1981-82: 






203,163, 
$ 8,454,496, 


,00 
,80 


Debt Accounts 








Liabilities 


and Reserves 






Serial Loans: 










Inside Debt Limit 










Land Acquisition 




25,000.00 






Municipal 




240,000.00 






Swimming Pool 




40,000.00 






Codman Kitchen 




12,500.00 






Codman Barn 




40,000.00 


357,500, 


.00 


Outside Debt Limit 










School 




260,000.00 






Water 




352,000.00 


612,000, 


00 



TOTAL 



$ 9,423,996.80 



59 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

J . Thom.i s Prank 1 in 

Joseph W. Howard 

Douglas M. Burckctt, Chairman 

The Board has, in turn, weathered classification and more lately 
Proposition 2\, but still staggers on. The life of the assessor is 
becoming less enchanting each year as the mandates and directives of 
the State government become greater in volume, more detailed in con- 
tent, and more limiting in scope, as it on the other hand attempts to 
computerize the entire system with little leeway for local judgment. 
Then again, the position of an assessor is now becoming so complex 
that the ordinary citizen who may wish to volunteer his or her 
services to the Town and opt to be elected to such a position, must 
now face a qualification program uniike that of any other Town 
official. So be it. While we are supposed to be progressing for the 
better each and every year, we are being confronted with a greater 
work load entailing more expense to the Town. 

Many persons have felt that the increase in valuations on their 
properties was done to raise more money for the Town on account of 
Proposition 2' 2 . This proposition has no effect on property valuations, 
but does effect the levy that the Town may raise by taxation. All the 
Board does is to try to apply a proper proportion of this levy for 
each owner to pay. 

Some information with which you should be familiar is listed 
below: 

1) The status of property on January 1 is the determinant of 
the tax in any year. 

2) All real estate and personal property tax abatement 
applications must be filed with the Board by October 1 of 
the year involved or 30 days after the date of mailing of 
the tax bill. 

3) Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement applications 
must be filed with the Board by December 31 of the year 
succeeding the year involved. If cars are changed during 
the year, it is the taxpayer's responsibility to file an 
abatement application. 

4) Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41 of the General Laws, as 
amended, provides for certain real estate tax exemptions for 
taxpayers who meet certain age, financial, etc., qualifica- 
tions. Additional information may be obtained from the 
Assessors' Office. All applications under Clause 41 must be 
filed with the Board by December 15 of the year involved. 

60 



5) Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41A, provides for the deferral 
of real estate tax payments in certain instances. Additional 
information may be obtained from the Assessors' Office. All 
application under this clause must be filed by December 15 
of the year involved. 

6) Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of Purple 
Heart awards, and others, may qualify for a partial 
exemption. Additional information about these exemptions 
may be obtained from the Assessors' Office. 



Real Estate Summary 







As 


sessed Valuation 


Property Description 


Number of Parcels 


as 


of Jan. 1, 1981 


Residential - single 
dwelling unit 


1,288 




$187,344,300 


Condominiums 


188 




24,321,400 


Residential - two or 
more dwelling units 


8 




6,778,400 


Part commercial/ 
part residential 


8 




1,019,100 


Commercial 


16 




3,623,800 


Industrial 


-- 




-- 


Land classified under 
Ch. 61 A - agricultural 


26 




1,309,600 


Vacant Land 


390 




10,414,900 


Totals 


1,924 




$234,811,500 



61 



1981-82 Recapitulation 

Appropriations and Assessments: 

Appropriations to be raised by taxation $4,931,046.77 

Appropriations to be taken from available funds 745,752.98 

Final court judgments 54.03 

Overlay deficits of previous years 2,005.99 

Offsets to Cherry Sheet estimated receipts 295,283.00 

State assessments 220,736.44 

County assessments 220,485.79 

Overlay current fiscal year 52 ,774.00 

Gross Amount to be Raised: $6,468,139.00 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 

Estimated receipts from State $1,011,663.00 

Over-estimates from prior years, State § County 810.23 

Local estimated receipts 678,736.39 
Free cash to reduce tax rate 

Amounts to be taken from available funds 745 ,752.98 

Total estimated receipts and available funds: $2,436,962.60 

Amount to be Raised by Taxation: $ 4,031 , 176.40 

$6,468,139.00 

Valuation and Tax: 



Real Estate 






















Residential 


$220 


,289 


,800 


at 


$16. 


,60 


$3 


,665 


,962, 


,77 


Open Space 


9 


,857 


,200 


at 


$16, 


,60 




163 


,591, 


,56 


Commercial 


4 


,664 


,500 


at 


$16, 


,60 




77 


,412, 


,75 


Industrial 




-- 














-- 






$234 : 


,811 


,500 


$3,896,967.08 


Personal Property 


$ 8 : 


,086 


,773 


at 


$16, 


,60 




134 


,209, 


,32 




$242 


,898 


,273 








$4 


,031, 


,176, 


40 



Tax Rate per thousand (1981-82) 

School rate $ 9.46 

General rate 7. 14 

$16.60 



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64 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENT 

D. James Arena, Chief 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the enforcement and response 
activities of the Police Department during the year 1981: 

MOTOR VEHICLE ENFORCEMENT: 

Number of accidents investigated 289 

Number of accidents with injury 73 

Fatal accidents 3 

Traffic citations issued 622 

CRIMINAL MATTERS: 

Crimes reported § investigated: 

Break § entry 58 

Larcenies 146 

Stolen vehicles, bicycles 21 

Narcotics violations 19 

Ordinance violations 5 

Vandalism 107 

Disturbances 91 

Domestic cases/civil problems 53 

Reports of attempted crimes 21 

Other incidents 47 

Arrests 116 

OTHER ACTIVITY: 

Response to alarms 890 
Reports of suspicious persons, vehicles, etc. 63 

Animal complaints 220 

Ambulance runs 288 

Assist to Fire Department 377 

Assist to other Police Agencies 145 
Total calls logged at Communications Desk 12,568 



65 



Although cutbacks in state programs affected the Criminal Justice 
Training Council course offerings we were still able to have officers 
attend a varied in-service training program during the year. As we 
present our budget for Fiscal 1983, we are faced with the prospect of 
possible cuts in service; our hopes are that alternate fundings will 
become available to allow us to maintain at the very minimum our 
current staffing. 

During 1981 we attempted to cut down on the number of false alarms 
requiring police response to businesses and residences by instituting 
a fee system. It appears that this program has had marked success as 
we have cut the number of alarms by almost 50% from the previous year. 

Again we extend our appreciation to the Auxiliary Police for their 
voluntary service at various times during the year and to our fellow 
Town employees and citizens of the community for their continued 
support and cooperation. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a list of activities of the Fire Department 
for the year 1981 : 

Accidents responded to 109 

Airport runs 34 

Ambulance runs 288 

Ambulance transports 202 

Brush fires 35 

Building fires 8 

Box alarms (building) 53 

False alarms 104 

Investigations 49 

Assist en "lock-outs" 58 

Motor vehicle fires 24 

Mutual aid calls 43 

Check reports of outside burning 11 

Special service 56 

Water problems 19 

Report of wires down or arcing 17 

Burning permits issued 522 

Tests (boxes) 75 

Fire drills 17 

Inspections 12 

The Fiscal 1983 budget calls for some changes in fire protection 
if limitations on spending remain. Among these would be the closing 
of the North Lincoln station and the sale of the engine currently 
assigned. Also considered would be a cutback in the numbers of 
personnel brought to the station when duty personnel are out on various 

66 



calls; a severe restriction on our ability to respond to multiple 
situations. 

In 1981 we put into service a new piece of fire apparatus, a 
compact engine-pumper which will provide a top grade addition to our 
fire-fighting capability. We have continued our training drills and 
have averaged an attendance of twenty-five call personnel per drill. 

As this report is being prepared we are saddened to report that 
Captain Joseph Bozak who had been serving in the capacity of Assist- 
ant Chief had suffered a heart attack. Although he is recovering, 
it is anticipated that he will be retiring due to health reasons; 
his long service to the community has been appreciated. 



67 



PUBLIC SAFETY BOARD 

James J. Paran 
Margaret simms 
John P. Stevenson 
Michael II. Tannert 
James R. Barnet, Chairman 

After the Town Meeting voted to acquire a new fire engine, the 
Board reviewed the specifications and bids for the new engine. The 
equipment was ordered and delivered to the Town in June. 

The Selectmen asked the Board to study the alternatives for 
fire protection for North Lincoln, now that Mr. Cotoni has retired. 
For the past few years, an engine has been housed at his farm and 
operated by Mr. Cotoni. 

The Board contacted seven neighboring towns with varying popu- 
lations (3,900 to lS.OOOTt to determine the number of fire stations, 
miles covered, response time and intersecting arteries, such as 
railroad crossings, Route 2, etc. 

Five alternatives were submitted to the Selectmen, with detailed 
evaluations of the various advantages and disadvantages of each 
alternative. 

Cost, staffing, and response time, as well as long range planning, 
will now have to be determined by the Selectmen and eventually the 
Town itself. 



68 



INSPECTORS OF BUILDING, WIRING AND PLUMBING 

Ernest L. Johnson, Building Inspector 
Kenneth Desmond, Wiring and Fire Alarm Inspector 
Russell J. Dixon, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 
Nancy Zuelke, Secretary 

During the calendar year 1981 applicants' estimated costs for 
new construction totaled $3,333,026.00. This was a decline from 
1980 of $1,652,273.00. Although this number represents a decline 
from the record years of 1979 and 1980 it should be pointed out that 
construction on new single family residences is proceeding at a 
very fast pace. These homes, some in new subdivisions, are in the 
$300,000.00 range plus land costs. 

Brooks Hill, a new subdivision off of Bedford Lane now has 4 
new residences under construction. Permits for the 5th lot have 
recently been issued. Only 4 remain undeveloped. 

At least 15 homes have been constructed at "Oak Meadow" located 
off of Lexington Road. The Umbrello subdivision between South Great 
Road and Tower Road has 3 new homes with more construction scheduled 
this spring. 

On July 1, 1981 the Massachusetts State Building Code Commission 
was eliminated and all responsibilities formerly handled by the 
Commission were transferred by the governor's executive order to the 
Department of Public Safety. Many of us in code enforcement have 
believed for many years that this is where the inforcement of the 
State Building Code belongs and we are in high hopes it will remain 
there. 

The licensing of all construction supervisiors will go into 
effect on July 1, 1982. The license fee to the State of Massachusetts 
is $150.00 for a 2 year period. All construction individuals work- 
ing for themselves will have to produce this license to local build- 
ing department officials before a building permit can be issued. 
Applications and more details on this new state regulation can be 
obtained at the Town Hall - Building Department. 

Repairs and maintenance of our town owned buildings continues 
very carefully due to proposition 2\ and a limited budget. 

Last year the Firemen did a considerable amount of interior 
painting at their station. This year the DPW employees have remodeled 
their own bathroom facilities. In both cases this has saved con- 
siderable tax dollars. Many "THANKS" to them for their efforts. 

Please remember that practically all construction requires a 
permit including the installation of all heating appliances . Advise 



69 



regarding these permit application procedures is available at the 
Town Hall . 

Statistics for the year are as follows: 

Values as submitted by applicants -- 

1. Buildings $3,333,026 

2. Plumbing 202,525 

3. Wiring 180,315 

$3,715,866 

Permits issued -- 



New residential 




18 


Residential additions 


6 remodeling 


45 


Garages, sheds § barns 




18 


Solar units 




7 


Pools 




4 


Greenhouses 




1 


Foundations 




1 


Fences 




3 


Roofing 




17 


Tents (temporary use) 




7 


Wood burning stoves 




77 


Signs 




5 


Miscellaneous 




4 
207 



Permit fees collected 

Building 

Plumbing 

Wiring 

Wood burning stoves 

Fire Alarms 

Signs 



$ 16 


,511 


4 


,962 


7 


,048 


1 


,215 




150 




15 



29,901 



70 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Ernest L. Johnson 

The General Laws of Massachusetts requires that all devices 
used for weighing or measuring commodities by accurately checked 
and certified at least once a year. 

For the year 1982 the seal is "RED". Look for it on gas 
pumps and scales in grocery stores and road side stands. All 
devices have been checked and certified as follows: 

Scales sealed 22 

Gasoline meters sealed 19 

Vehicle tank trucks sealed 18 

Weights scaled — 

Total 77 

Fees collected $290.60 



71 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

George P. Faddoul , DVM 
John M. O'Loughlin, MD 
William B. Stason, MD, MS, Chairman 

During 1981, the Board of Health has focused major attention 
on - 

1. Revising Board of Health regulations and procedures 

2. Improving the level of surveillance given to local restau- 
rants, school lunch programs, and other health-related activities 
in the town. 

The revision of regulations and procedures aims both to bring 
the Town into full compliance with State regulations and to provide 
clear guidelines for citizens and for future Board of Health members 
This task has taken more time than previously anticipated; we antici- 
pate completion by summer, 1982. 

The other major goal of the Board in 1981 was to improve sur- 
veillance for health-related problems. Mr. Steven Calichman, 
Health Officer in Acton, was hired as a consulting sanitarian. His 
expertise has permitted identification and correction of several 
potential health hazards, especially in food dispensing establish- 
ments. This program will continue on an experimental basis in 1982, 
and an evaluation of its benefits and costs will be performed at 
the end of the year. 

Implementation of a cost-based user fee system has permitted 
the Board of Health to breakeven even on all activities except: the 
school health program, home care and immunization for the elderly, 
support of the Eliot Mental Health Center, and animal inspector. 
These activities are funded from the Town's taxes. Costs of septic 
system inspections, garbage collections, septage haulers inspections 
and the rabies vaccination clinic are covered fully by user's fees. 

SANITARY LANDFILL 

A geohydrological survey was completed in November, 1981. This 
found that landfill leachate moves to the northwest and not toward 
Hobbs Brook or the Cambridge Reservoir. No critical contaminants 
were noted. Recommendations to reduce leachate movement by using 



a less pervious cover material and to monitor groundwater quality on 
a regular basis have been implemented. Funds for monitoring will 
be requested in the DPW budget. 

SUBSURFACE SEWAGE DISPOSAL SYSTEMS 

Twenty-one new systems were installed; four systems were upgrad- 
ed to accomodate bedroom additions; and 6 failing systems were re- 
paired. In all cases careful inspections of workmanship were per- 
formed by Frank Emmons, Town Engineer. The Board of Health's philo- 
sophy on septic systems is to be as helpful as possible to residents, 
while, at the same time, enforcing reasonable conformance with the 
State's Title V regulations. 

SEPTAGE HAULERS 

The Selectmen's decision to transfer the disposal of septage 
from the MDC site to the North Andover site had the effect of saving 
the Town the tax cost of the MDC contract while increasing fees 
charged by haulers to individual residents. Septage haulers fees 
increased by 50 or more percent to defray the costs of the longer 
"haul". A stricter program for inspecting and licensing septage 
haulers was implemented. A list of licensed haulers is available. 
Unlicensed haulers will not be permitted in Town. 

EMERSON HOME HEALTH CARE SERVICES 

The Board of Health continued its contractual relationship 
with the Emerson Home Health Care Program to: 

1. Provide school nursing services. 

2. Supervise school health aides. 

3. Provide home care services, especially following hospital 
discharge and for the home-bound elderly. 

4. Provide follow-up of reports of "reportable" communicable 
diseases. 

5. Administer the flu vaccination program for the elderly and 
disabled. 

The program operated smoothly during 1981, and no major health 
problems were encountered. Ms. Lois Shimmin replaced Ms. Faye 
Collins as Director of the Emerson Home Health Care Program. Ms. 
Jan Tuxbury, School Nurse, and Ms. Mary O'Brien and Ms. Anne Mahoney, 
Health Aides, have been superlative .both professionally and in terms 
of their sensitivity to the needs of the children and their parents. 

To reduce the costs of the Emerson Home Care contract an ex- 
periment is being conducted to examine the substitution of telephone 
contacts for some home visits. Our feeling is that, in selected 
cases, the telephone contact will be just as effective and much more 
efficient. Evaluation of this change will take place in the fall 
of 1982. 

73 



SCHOOL NURSE SERVICES, by hours. (1980-81) 

Classes 1 hr. 

Conferences 186 hrs. 

First Aid 38 hrs. 

Immunization 24 hrs. 

Physicals 30 hrs. 

Records £ Reports 149 hrs. 

Visual 5 Audio Testing 37 hrs. 

Pre-school Registration 4 hrs. 

Miscellaneous 82 hrs. 

"766" Program _J_2 hrs. 

TOTAL HOURS 563 

SUMMARY OF HEALTH ROOM ACITIVTY (1980-81) 



Dismissed from school 
Illness 
Accidents 
Minor: 

Class 

Gym 

Playground 
Major 

Class 

Gym 

Playground 
Miscellaneous 
Total Health Room Visits 2559 3172 5731 

Other School Health Activities 

Immunizations were provided to a few children who are not able 
to obtain these from their private physicians, and TB testing was 
performed on staff and student transfers. Hearing screening on 230 
children in Brooks and 375 children in Hartwell resulted in 10 
abnormal results and 7 physician referrals, while vision screening 
on the same population identified 18 abnormal results and 16 re- 
ferrals. The results of referrals are being evaluated. Postural 
screening (for early signs of scoliosis) resulted in 11 physician 
referrals. 

School Physician : David McCormack, MD continued under separate 
contract to supervise school health activities, to recheck positive 
screening results before referral, and to perform selected physical 
examinations where required. We greatly appreciate Dr. McCormack' s 
expert and conscientious services. 



"4 



Hartwell 


Smith 


Total 


146 


131 


277 


548 


543 


1091 


153 


149 


302 


68 


241 


309 


646 


40 


686 


2 


1 


3 


5 


3 


8 


10 


1 


11 


981 


2063 


3044 



HOME CARE SERVICES 

Emerson Home Health Care Services are available to all residents 
in Lincoln. These services include the visiting nurse, home health 
aides, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and 
social services. The costs of services are met through health 
insurance wherever possible. Certain preventive services and services 
for residents not covered by insurance or where hardship would result 
from private payment are covered by the Town's contract with Emerson. 

During FY 1981 services reimbursed by the Town included 7 home 
visits for reportable communicable diseases, primarily meningitis 
and tuberculosis, 73 visits to maintain "wellness"; 7 nursing visits 
to ill patients; and 22 home visits by the medical social worker. 

FLU CLINIC 

In the fall a free flu clinic was held and 65 persons received 
influenza vaccine. State support of the flu vaccine program will 
be withdrawn in 1982, necessitating an increase in cost to the Town 
of about $2.75 per vaccination. 

ELIOT COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTER. INC. 



The Center provided a variety of services to Lincoln residents 
in FY 81. Seventy residents, about equally divided between children 
and adults, received a total of 2226 hours of care for a variety 
of interpersonal problems, feeling states, and school problems. 
In addition, 395 hours of consultation and education services were 
provided. The cost of these services was estimated to be $73,580, 
$9,872 of which was received from residents, $5,272 from town taxes, 
and the balance from other sources including federal and state 
contracts. 



75 



ANNIMAL INSPECTOR 

Laura Perry 

Care of animals is governed by the Department of Food and Agri 
culture, Division of Animal Health of the Commonwealth. Bach year 
the Animal Inspector supplies the Commonwealth with a list of 
animal owners and the numbers, kinds, and the state of health and 
care of each animal at the various locations in Lincoln. If there 
are any complaints or problems with the health or care of any live- 
stock in Lincoln it is handled by the Animal Inspector who follows 
the towns and state animal health rules and regulations. 

Dog bites are also the responsibility of the Animal Inspector. 
When someone is bitten by a dog, the dog is quanantined for 10 days 
observed for signs of rabies and if found healthy, released. 





Statistics 




Estimated number of barns 




65 


Horses 




81 


Ponies 




37 


Pigs 




22 


Cows 




10 


Goats 




10 


Sheep 




60 


Donkeys 




3 


Mules 




3 


Dog bites 




15 



76 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Clifford Bowles 

Lucy Cole 

Mary Ford 

Harry Healey, Treasurer 

Robert Henderson 

Joan Klotz 

Sarah Mansfield, Secretary 

John Manzelli, Vice Chairman 

Louise Meeks 

Anne Satterfield 

Fred Tavlor 

Beverly Eckhardt, Chairman 

Ruth Kramer, Coordinator 

The Council on Aging has, in 1981, continued its administration 
of programs and services to assist in meeting the needs of the older 
segment of Lincoln's residents which now comprises nearly 20% 
of the town's population. Included in these special programs are: 
(1) Delivery of meals to shut-ins five days a week from the kitchen 
at Emerson Hospital, by a network of volunteer drivers, (2) Monthly 
Health Clinics at Pierce House staffed by members of Emerson's Home 
Care Department, to afford elders convenient and cost -free checks 
on blood pressure in a pleasant setting where friends may converse, 
(3) Bus trips to spots of interest in the region, (4) Talks and movies, 
many in cooperation with the Lincoln Library, oriented toward the 
interests and concerns of the 60-plus set, (5) Classes in useful 
crafts and mild exercise, taught by skilled instructors, and (6) 
a Newsletter to keep the town informed on Council events and elder 
issues in general. 

In March, Jane Rasmussen, the Council's first paid part-time 
Coordinator, resigned after two years of very much appreciated 
service to take full-time employment at the Rehabilitation Hospital 
in Woburn. At about the same time, Charlotte Barnaby retired from 
the Council after six years of service, the latter of which were 
spent as Chairwoman. With these great losses, the Council was 
fortunate to recruit Ruth Kramer, a Lincoln resident, as Acting 
Coordinator upon Mrs. Rasmussen 's departure. After a formal search 
process, Ruth was selected as Coordinator to assume duties on June 
1, 1981. 

Realizing the need to control expenditures in the face of rising 
costs and increased demand for services, the Council has been diligent 
in applying for funds from outside sources. Funds from the State's 
Department of Elder Affairs (DEA) have enabled the purchase of a 
table, chairs, typewriter stand and file cabinets to equip the office 
now shared with the League of Women Voters. A separate "Formula" 
grant from DEA provided $300 to support classes in furniture re- 
finishing and in music and movement. A grant from the Area Agency 

77 



on Aging gave two-thirds of the purchase price of a telephone answer- 
ing device. The answering device has been in operation since 
September and has been particularly useful because of the part-time 
nature of office hours. 

A significant development that should offer considerable support 
to the COA in the future is the formation of a formal, non-profit 
organization to be known as "Friends of the Lincoln Council on 
Aging". The incorporation has been assisted by free legal advice 
from the Department of Elder Affairs. An invitation to members is 
anticipated by mid-1982, following establishment of non-profit 
status with the Internal Revenue Service. 

In its 1980 Annual Report, the Council on Aging noted its 
desire to relocate to space more suited to access by older persons. 
In 1981, the Council has been represented on the town's Space 
Committee by Lucy Cole. Should space become available in the Town 
Hall, it is hoped that the Council will be provided a private office 
for the maintenance of confidential files and a conference room for 
meetings, preparation of newsletters and for informal programs. 

Many volunteers have provided invaluable assistance to the Council 
in the past year. Particularly, thanks are extended to the dedicated 
drivers who have given so much time to delivering meals to shut-ins 
and to giving rides to those needing to get to medical appointments 
and to visit the sick in nursing homes. Also appreciated are the 
efforts of those who have taken the time to make friendly visits 
to elders living alone. Without this assistance, given so willingly, 
the Council would have been unable to extend its programs to those 
most in need. On behalf of the Town, the Council thanks all concerned. 

MINUTEMAN HOME CARE CORPORATION (MHCC) 

The Town of Lincoln is one of 16 towns in the region, which by 
paying an annual assessment is entitled to receive services from the 
Minuteman Home Care Corporation. MHCC is a non-profit social service 
agency which receives funds from local, state and federal sources. 
Funds from the federal Title XX of the Social Security Act and from 
the State Home Care budget pay for case managment by a social worker, 
homemaker and chore services for persons aged 60 and over whose 
incomes meet specified criteria. Lincoln currently has 30 individuals 
qualified for homemaker service from MHCC. In the past fiscal year, 
7 residents received nearly 2000 hours of these services. Lincoln's 
annual assessment of $198 has brought $11,905 in services to the 
homes of our elders in need from July, 1980 to June, 1981. 

MHCC also receives funds through Title III-B and Title III-C of 
the Older Americans Act. Title III-B supports Area Agency programs 
such as Adult Day Health Centers, the Senior Citizens Law Project, 
Protective Services, Transportation Services and aid to local Councils 
on Aging. Title III-C funds are devoted to nutrition programs 

78 



providing low-cost meals to those 60 and over. Lincoln elders have 
benefited from a number of these programs in 1981. Unfortunately, 
continuance of the present level of services may be greatly reduced 
if a proposed 27% cut in federal funds to the Area Agency is realized. 

The Board of Selectmen appoints one Director and one Alternate 
to the Board of MHCC. During 1981, Lincoln has been represented 
on the MHCC Board of Directors by Beverly Eckhardt who is in 1981-1982 
the Clerk/Secretary of the Board and Chairwoman of the By-Laws 
Committee. Miriam Korhonen is Lincoln's Alternate Director and a 
member of the Social Committee. 



79 



DOG OFFICER 

Laura Perry 

The following is a report of my activities as Dog Officer from 
July, 1980 through June, 1981. 

The 2000 calls consist of lost, found, strayed, problems at 
the schools, complaints, neighborhood problems, chasing and harass- 
ing people, chasing and killing livestock, hit by cars, packs of 
dogs, information, adoption, and problems with cats, skunks, raccoons 
horses, cows, pigs, etc. A record system kept daily and the town 
and state dog regulations have helped find solutions for all the 
different kinds of problems. 

The established communication with Dog Officers of neighbor- 
ing towns and the Lost Pet Hot Line has helped in the effort to 
match lost and found dogs with their owners. The Buddy Dog Humane 
Society in Sudbury has been a great help in placing stray dogs from 
the pound in good homes. 

I would like to take this opportunity to remind all dog owners 
that your dog must be licensed and the tag must be on the dog at 
all times. The most important reason for the tag is that in the 
event that your dog is lost or injured, you can be notified immed- 
iately and perhaps save its life. 

Statistics on Activities of Dog Officer 
July, 1980 through June, 1981 

Calls 

Lost Dogs 451 

Found Dogs 409 

Complaints 384 

Other animals 88 

Dog bites 80 

Dead- hit animals 58 

Vet 42 

Cats 221 

Information 223 

Total Calls 1957 

Hours on road 738 

Hours of paper work 305 

Mileage 2390 



80 



NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 

128 WEST RESOURCE RECOVERY COUNCIL 
Henry J. Rugo, Town Representative 

SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE 

Christopher T. Carlson 
Ruth A. Hendrickson 
Henry J. Rugo, Chairman 

The intensive efforts of the North East Solid Waste Committee 
(NESWC) over many years finally bore fruit in 1981. An agreement was 
completed with UOP Inc. to operate a resource recovery plant in North 
Andover with a capacity of 1500 tons of solid waste per day for 20 
years beginning in 1985. 

The New England Power Company has signed a twenty-year agreement 
to purchase the electric power produced by the NESWC project at 90% 
of avoided fuel cost. Participating municipalities will receive 89.5% 
of the energy revenues and 50% of net recovered metals revenue and will 
share transportation cost in a form that will partially offset the 
outlay to distant communities like Lincoln. 

Landfill sites have been provided for disposal of the residue from 
the recovery plant and of any solid waste that cannot be accepted by 
the plant due to an emergency shutdown. Environmental protection 
regulations have been met and access routes provided with local com- 
munity approval. Member communities may continue or establish source 
segregation/separation/recycling programs for glass, metals or paper 
at their option. 

Signatory communities will retain a measure of control over 
continuing operations through membership on the Advisory Council as 
provided by the Community By-Laws which will become operative as soon 
as the 900 tons per day (TPD) minimum commitment is attained. Design 
and financing arrangements will commence as soon as the minimum level 
of support is reached. 

Presentations were made in detail to the Town boards and public 
by the contractor and by the technical and legal consultants provided 
by the Commonwealth. They included comparison with alternative solu- 
tions and permitted update and summary of the Selectmen's continuing 
review of the NESWC project. The Selectmen in December signed, the 
operating agreement to make Lincoln a participant municipality, thus 
contributing toward the 600 TPD commitment that was reached by the end 
of the year. It is expected that the 900 TPD minimum for project con- 
tinuation will be attained by the February 28, 1982 deadline as more 
municipalities complete their review of the project and make their 
decisions. 

Much effort was spent in the active development of the 128 West 
Resource Recovery Council (128WRRC) project to provide a viable 

81 



alternative for parallel consideration, bat an acceptable agreement 
could not be completed before the NESWC deadline. However, Lincoln 
continues its active participation in the 128 WRRC as an alternative 
in the event the NESWC project is disabled for any reason. 

Subject to the uncertainties attending any project of this 
magnitude, a solution has been achieved of the most difficult and time- 
consuming aspect of the Town's solid waste disposal problem. Plans 
for the collection of the Town's solid waste and for its transportation 
to the recovery plant will be developed and presented to the Town for 
decision prior to the beginning of plant operation in 1985. Partici- 
pation and cooperation of all Town citizens will continue to be wel- 
come in bringing this final phase to completion. 



82 



Planning and Public Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

Robert C. Brannen 
. Basil C. Chigas 
Rosamond P. Delori 
Guy E. Guarino 
William G. Constable, Chairman 

The objectives of Planning Board activities are perhaps best 
described among the purposes of the Lincoln Zoning By-Law, which 
include "to promote and conserve the health, safety, morals, conve- 
nience and general welfare", "to lessen congestion", "to encourage the 
provision of housing for persons of all income levels", "to conserve 
natural conditions", "to facilitate the adequate provision of trans- 
portation, drainage, schools, parks, open space" and to encourage "the 
most appropriate uses of land within the Town". In 1981, the Planning 
Board pursued these objectives with gusto. In addition to adminis- 
tering the Zoning By-Law through its subdivision, site plan, and 
special permit regulatory authority, the Planning Board has actively 
considered more generic planning issues associated with traffic, bike 
paths, the use of Hanscom Field, increased housing diversity, 
commercial and industrial development immediately adjacent to Lincoln, 
and longer range planning issues. 

Administration of the Zoning By-Law continues to be the primary, 
and most time-consuming, activity of the Planning Board. The Board 
encourages "creative development" through the R- 1 cluster provisions 
of the Zoning By-Law. These provisions permit, under Planning Board 
supervision, innovative siting and landscaping of houses while 
providing increased open space, trails and public safety. This year, 
the Planning Board has begun the cluster subdivision process with land 
owned by Stratford Realty off Huckleberry Hill Road and Gechijian on 
Brooks Road, and has continued its detailed approvals and oversight on 
cluster subdivisions known as Oak Meadow, Brooks Hill, Umbrello, 
Mosher/Schliemann, and White. In the R-2 General Residence District, 
the Board completed its supervision of the GreenRidge Condominiums, 
and considered a development proposal on Benson/Al lott land. 

In the aftermath of the destruction of the barn owned by the 
Massachusetts Audubon Society, the Society has undertaken a planning 

33 



process for all of Drum 1 in Para, and h 

preliminary plans, \fter extensive discussions with the appli 
neighbors, t he Board approved a site plan permitl on of the 

ham and certain accessory buildings in the- farm area. Other approvals 
are expected to be sought during r> 

In L981, the Board adopted new Subdivision Ruli a 1 at ions 
to clarify the Town's requirements and to make subdivision rules con- 
sistent with the requirements of the State Building Code, the Water 
Commission, and the Town Engineer and the Building Inspector. 

Housing opportunities for persons of low and moderate income 
remain an important objective of the Board. It has met with and 
assisted several applicants seeking special permits for accessory 
apartments. The Board continues to support the efforts of the Housing 
Commission. It has also wrestled with the definition of family and 
the innovative use of larger single-family residences. 

The 1981 Town Meeting approved a substantial revision of the 
Zoning By-Law provisions regarding signs. With the assistance of a 
newly established Sign Committee appointed by the Board, a number of 
illegal signs have been brought into compliance and several sign 
applications approved. 

Another subcommittee of the Planning Board, the Long Range 
Planning Committee, advises the Board about significant planning 
issues in the Town. Among other efforts, the Committee has undertaken 
a re-examination of Lincoln's demographic characteristics and has 
begun to interpret results of a demographic questionnaire distributed 
with the annual Town Census in January. 

The supervision of land use in the B-2 Service Business District 
continues, although less significant visual improvements have occurred 
in the past year. The regulatory emphasis on Lewis Street, for 
example, has shifted somewhat to the enforcement of existing approved 
plans and permits in that area. To permit the Building Inspector to 
more efficiently enforce the Zoning By-Law, the Planning Board has 
endorsed a schedule of fines permitting the noncriminal disposition of 
zoning violations . 

Commercial and industrial growth immediately adjacent to Lincoln 
is an ever-present concern. The threat of adverse traffic impacts 
arises from existing and proposed commercial development at the New 
England Tech Center, ERT, and Millipore in Concord, GTE and the 
Kennedy land in Waltham, the Nolan, Norton property in Lexington, and 
at Hanscom Field by MassPort. In addition to the Board's coordination 
with the Massachusetts Area Planning Council and the Hanscom Area 
Traffic Committee, the Board has begun its own traffic analysis as 
approved at the 1981 Annual Town Meeting. John Caswell, retired 
Planning Board Chairman, has constructed a computerized traffic model 



for Lincoln and surrounding communities. By estimating traffic times 
between different traffic "nodes" in the adjacent towns surrounding 
Lincoln, and by inserting road use data acquired by the State and the 
Lincoln DPW, the model can indicate how rush-hour traffic within 
Lincoln will be affected by any nearby development which generates a 
given number of employee trips per day. The Planning Board applauds 
John for his ambitious, successful and cost-effective efforts on 
behalf of the Town. With the data now available, the Town and its 
experts may wield a more substantial voice in improving the region's 
traffic patterns. 

Progress in 1981 on bike paths has been less than satisfactory. 
Although design of the roadside path along Route 126 has been begun 
by the Bicycle Path Committee and the Town Engineer, construction 
cannot commence until easements are received from certain landowners. 
However, construction should begin in 1982, funded by State aid and 
an appropriation of the 1981 Town Meeting. Construction of the Old 
Brooks Road bike path was undertaken by the Town DPW last summer. 
Due in part to concerns raised by Town boards and employees, and on 
account of the decision to rent certain equipment which had not been 
considered in estimating costs, funds for the path became exhausted 
before its completion. In addition, despite the clear danger already 
existing by pedestrians attempting to cross Route 2 at Brooks Road, 
the State has refused to permit the Town to erect a fence discouraging 
such crossings. The Town is investigating the means by which the path 
may be completed as far as possible without further appropriation, 
and procedures to avoid such cost overruns have been implemented. 

In addition to the more traditional activities of the Planning 
Board, the Board this year has tilted at windmills and antennae, has 
loosed Polaroid cameras on the signs in Town, has pondered solar barns 
and has reviewed museum cafes. The Board could not accomplish any of 
its objectives without the able assistance and support of its 
Administrative Secretary Bryce Wolf, Town Engineer Frank Emmons and 
other Town employees. The creative efforts and cooperation of 
Planning Board subcommittees and other Town boards are also crucial 
to the Board's effectiveness, and the Board appreciates its continued 
good relations with those entities. 



85 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

D'Arcy MacMahon 

Mary Sheldon 

David F. Sykes 

Jane Cooper Williams 

James F. McHugh, Chairman 

Morton Braun, Associate Member 
Margaret Marsh, Associate Member 

During 1981, the Board of Appeals received 42 applications and 
held 17 public hearings. Thirteen of the applications were for re- 
newal of existing special permits. All of these were granted. Of 
the remainder, 16 applications were for new special permits. Twelve 
of these were granted, 3 were denied and 1 application was withdrawn. 
The reminaing 13 applications were for variances, 7 of which were 
granted, 1 of which was denied and 4 of which were withdrawn. The 
remaining application turned out to be a delightful rarity raising, 
as it did, a question which the Board concluded it had no need to 
decide one way or the other. 

The past year also witnessed Barbara Barker's retirement from 
the Board. Barbara's calm demeanor coupled with her cheerful and 
thoughtful approach to matters which came before the Board were 
the hallmark of her tenure. Her advice and wise counsel will be 
missed in the future. Mary Sheldon, who had served as an Associate 
Member of the Board since 1979, was appointed to the vacancy created 
by Barbara's departure and Margaret Marsh was appointed to Mary's 
position as an Associate Member. The Board looks forward to working 
with both of them in the future. 

During the past year, as in previous years, the Board found that 
the scope of its power to act on petitions for a variance was often 
misunderstood. In some cases, that misunderstanding led to significant 
disappointment when a belief that obtaining a variance was a "pro 
forma" exercise proved to be unfounded. 

Unlike its broad discretionary power when acting on applications 
for special permits, the Board's power to grant a variance is 
narrowly constrained by Massachusetts law superimposed on the re- 
quirements of the by-law itself. The Massachusetts statute dealing 
with variances is not simply a mechanism for enabling people who 
wish to do something with their property the by-law does not routine- 
ly permit to obtain Town sanction for doing so. Instead, the statu- 
tory scheme for granting variances presumes that everyone will be 
bound by the provisions of the by-law unless a landowner can show 
that extreme hardship will result if he or she is forced to do so. 
Moreover, not just any hardship will suffice. The hardship must 
be one which springs directly from soil conditions, shape or topo- 
graphy unique to the landowner's property which, in the main, would 

86 



render that property useless for all practical purposes unless the 
variance were granted. 

In sum, the variance procedure is designed to allow use of land 
for a particular purpose despite the provisions of the by-law only 
in those rare cases in which land almost would be forced to sit idle 
if the terms of the by-law were not varied. If one recognizes in 
advance that this Board has no power to vary the terms of the by-law 
simply in accordance with its own notions of what makes good sense 
and what would be appropriate in a given neighborhood, disappointments 
resulting from unfavorable action by the Board on petitions for vari- 
ances will be greatly reduced. 

• As in past years, the Board continues to rely on, and to receive, 
the assistance of numerous other Town boards in connection with the 
applications presented to it. It remains grateful for that assistance, 
In the same vein, the Board extends again a particular note of thanks 
to Nancy Zuelke, its Clerk, for her continuing careful attention to 
the administrative details so necessary for its continued efficient 
operation. 



87 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Kenneth Bassett 

Joseph Bower 

Lee Dane 

James DeNormandie 

William Preston 

William Rizzo 

John Quincy Adams, Chairman 

In May the Selectmen received and accepted the resignation of 
Mr. Taschioglou, Mr. Beal and Mr. Lemire. Mr. Joseph Bower, Mr. 
Kenneth Bassett and Mr. William Rizzo were appointed to these 
vacancies. The Commission wishes to express its appreciation to the 
departing gentlemen for their years of devoted service and especially 
to Mr. Lemire for 15 years of leadership as Chairman of the Commis- 
sion, during which over 1,000 acres were acquired by the Town for 
conservation purposes and management programs were instituted. 

Acquisition Program 

The Conservation Commission will present an article at the 
Annual Town Meeting for the acquisition of property owned by Mr. ''.'. 
F. Herman. This land of 22.43 acres is closely integrated with 
existing conservation land into which it fits like a piece of a 
puzzle, and over which passes an important interconnecting trail on 
a long peninsula forested by mature oak and pine with wetlands on 
either side. It is connected to Silver Hill Road by a 2,000' 
easement passing entirely through conservation restricted land. 

A careful review of land of conservation interest has been 
undertaken, using the 1977 Open Space Plan as a guide. Under this 
plan, about 700 acres of land remain to be protected, of which 
approximately half is wetland. Deliberation has focussed on land 
which should be saved in its entirety, such as the land within the 
Sandy Pond watershed, and land which is capable of contai 
limited development without materially disturbing the open space 
pattern of the Town. Neighborhood meetings are planned for the 
coming year. 

The Commission wishes to express its gratitude to the Joseph 
Maillets for a 2.4 acre gift of land containing a unique grove of 
American Beech and a section of trail from Sandy Pond Road, '"e also 
thank Mrs. Harriet Rogers and her sen and daughter, David Rogers and 
Susan Bell, for an equally important gift of land leading from Brooks 
Road to the Tanner's Brook conservation land. 

Wetlands 



Six wetlands hearings were held by the Commission, prinaril] 

for the construction of oonds and driveways. 



Conservation Land Management 

The following are reports of activities talcing place on 
Lincoln's conservation land: 

Farmland Program : The farmland program received much attention 
in 1981. After discussion, the following policy was adopted: 

Farmland Management Policy 

1.) The Conservation Commission is steward of the land. It is 
the responsibility of the Commission to pass on the land 
to successor generation in better fertility and tilth than 
when it was received. 

2.) The function of the Conservation Commission shall be mana- 
gerial in scope. The Commission shall act in an oversight 
capacity to active farmers rather than actively engaging 
in farming on its own. 

3.) The purposes of the Conservation Commission have costs 

associated with them. Whenever possible, it is the policy 
of the Commission to reduce this cost to the Town through 
user charges where they are consistent with the Commission's 
purposes. In the instance of farmland, rent shall be 
charged all farmers. 

4.) Conservation Commission policy is to encourage the con- 
tinued existence of commercial farming in and around 
Lincoln. To this end, the Commission will continue to 
keep its rents within reason, to be set after regular con- 
sultation with surrounding towns as to their rents and 
policies. 

5.) Farming of agricultural land shall not be undertaken in a 
preemptive manner. Multiple use shall be encouraged at 
all seasons of the year by perimeter trails, and multiple 
use of the entire parcel during the off season shall be 
allowed where appropriate. 

Rental agreements between the Commission and the farmers of 
Town agricultural land was reviewed and updated. In light of Prop- 
osition 2% and a request from the Selectmen, the Commission voted to 
increase its farmland rental fees. The new fees become $20 an acre 
for hay land and $25 an acre for vegetable and nursery crops in 1982. 
The Commission will continue to rent to farmers who are concerned 
with the long term productivity of the land. 

46 acres of Town land were planted to vegetables in 1981, 87.5 
acres to hay, and 8.5 to nursery crops, for a productive total of 
142 acres. Total farmland revenue was $2,402.50. 

89 



Ranger Program : During 1981, the Ranger Program continued to im- 
prove. Amy Wales and Donald Gibbs were employed as summer Rangers. A 
daily activity report was developed to record visitor data, inci- 
dents and ranger time allocation. Figures indicate that over 60,00C 
people use Lincoln's conservation land each year, with highest con- 
centrations at Mt. Misery, Pierce Park and Sandy Pond. The records 
of incidents show that nude sunbathing and illegal swimming continue 
to decline at Mt. Misery as a result of Ranger presence. Sandy Pond, 
our public water supply, is attracting increasing numbers of visitors 
and swimmers, and will require greater ranger effort. Swimmers at 
Sandy Pond received $25 citations this summer. 

An Internship Program was developed by Nathalie Lowe, the Con- 
servation Ranger, in which college students receive credit for 
research conducted on Lincoln's conservation land. Studies were 
undertaken this year on the past land use and vegetation of the 
Sandy Pond area, and on the past ownership of the "Brown Land" off 
Weston Road. In addition, the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 
generously funded a summer employee who researched the past land use 
and ownership of Mt. Misery. 

Of special mention is the close support which Nathalie Lowe 
receives from the Police Department, without which her job would be 
most difficult. 

Trails : Maintenance of trails included the construction of water 
bars at Mt. Misery to control erosion. The Commission was assisted 
by the Lincoln Boy Scouts in this effort. The muddy section of 
trail on the north side of Sandy Pond was rerouted and two bridges 
were built over seasonal streams. About 1000' of new trail was laid 
out and cleared at Pine Hill, and at the Dean Land, an old unsafe 
bridge was replaced. Seven motor vehicle barriers were installed 
at the newly acquired Adams Woods parcel . 

Fields : Brush at the edges of the Mt. Misery and Codman fields was 
cut back to keep this land open. All fields that were not rented 
were mowed to ensure that they do not return to forest land. 

Forests : With the objective of integrating recreational, wildlife 
and aesthetic values with the production of forest products, a con- 
sulting forester was retained to do a forest inventory of Mt. Misery. 
This constitutes the first step in inventorying all conservation 
lands and the development of management plans. 

A selective fuelwood cut was conducted at Mt . Misery this year 
in which five acres were thinned of poor trees to enable remaining 
trees to prosper. Similar forestry work was done at Pine Hill. 
Approximately 200 cords of firewood will be for sale this year as a 
result of these and other forestry improvement projects. 



90 



Proposition 2h 

The Commission has responded to Proposition 2H by increasing 
the revenues from the rental of farmland and the sale of firewood. 
The Commission has agreed to provide $2,000 worth of gravel for the 
completion of the Brooks Road bikepath, and finally, we have re- 
duced our expenses, exclusive of salaries, by 33% for FY 32-83. 



91 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Roger M. Barzun 

William G. Constable 

Lawrence T. Holden, Jr. 

Will iam A. King 

John F. Loud, Treasurer 

Margaret B. Marsh 

Samuel G. Mygatt 

Ruth W. Wales 

William M. Preston, Chairman 

During 1981, the Trust received a gift of 9.58 acres of land 
from Endeavor Realty Trust which comprised the open space of their 
cluster development on the eastern portion of the former Umbrello 
property, at the corner of Tower Road and Route 117. This includes 
a corridor leading out to Tower Road which will make possible 
several important trail connections. 

A perpetual Conservation Restriction was received from William 
M. Preston on a 5.25 acre lot (No. 106-15.02) adjacent to other 
land owned by the Trust along Stony Brook; it is accompanied by 
a firm trail easement for the benefit of the public, across the 
lot and out to Weston Road. Another C.R. was received from the 
Old Bedford Associates on the 13.0 acres of open space of their 
Brooks Hill subdivision on Bedford Lane. 

The joint Annual Meeting of the Land Trust and the Rural Land 
Foundation was held on May 26th with Dr. Gerard A. Bertrand, 
President of Massachusetts Audubon Society, as speaker. At a 
special fall meeting of the Trust Mr. Kelly McClintock, Executive 
Director of the Environmental Lobby of Massachusetts, discussed 
the crisis of State environmental programs in light of the prevailing 
fiscal austerity. 

As part of a long range project to gather information about 
the Town's principle tracts of conservation land, the Trust employed 
Jo Springer as a summer intern working under the immediate supervision 
on the Conservation Commission's Ranger/Naturalist, Nathalie Lowe. 
Concentrating on two areas, Mt . Misery and Sandy Pond, Ms. Springer 
investigated the past ownership of the land and the changes in 
farming practices since colonial days by studying old records and 
historical references. She conducted a number of interviews of 
"old residents", several of which she taped. Her results are in part 
available in a monograph, "Historical Land Use and Land Owners of 
Mt. Misery" and material was gathered for a second article on the 
Sandy Pond area. 

Because the Land Trust is managing a comparatively large fund 
which is earmarked for the completion in stages of the purchase 






(on the Town's behalf) of the Adams Conservation Area by 1984, it 
was thought to be more meaningful to separate the report of our 
Treasurer into two parts, as follows: 

TREASURER'S REPORT OF THE ADAMS WOODS ACCOUNT 

Balance 12/31/80 

Fidelity Cash Reserves 47,000.00 

Cash for deposit in Fid. Cash Res. 513.44 

Cash for the 1/2/81 payment to the Adams 178,750.00 

226,263.44 
1/2/81 payment to the Adams -178,750.00 

47,513.44 

Received 1/5/81 thru 12/31/81 

From Town 110,318.39 

From the State 242,000.00 

From individuals 300. 00 

352,618.39 
Total transferred to Fid. Cash Res. 400,131.83 

Interest accrued 57,201 .03 

Balance 12/31/81 in Fidelity Cash Reserves 457,332.86 

The above balance on 12/31/81 was slightly greater than the amount 
which would have been needed to pay off the entire principal and the 
interest due at that date on the mortgage held by the Adams. 

TREASURER'S REPORT EXCLUDING THE ADAMS WOODS ACCOUNT 

Balance 12/31/80 

Hvd Trust Savings ace. 476.58 

Hvd Trust Checking ace. 430.68 

Treasury bills 14,507.60 

15,444.86 

Income 

Contributions 4,610.00 

Sale of maps 275.00 

Rent of land 150.00 

Bequest, J.W.P. Mem. Fund 5,362.22 
Interest 

Hvd Trust 199.16 

Treasury bills 482.40 

J.W.P. Fund 367.77 

Fid. Daily Income Trust 2,105.75 

13,552.28 

28,967.14 



93 



Expenses 

Labor 5 materials 

I.R.S. (FICA) 

Historical studies 

Printing and postage 

Insurance 

Mass. filing fee 

Wiring fees 



Balance 12/31/81 

Hvd Trust Savings 

Hvd. Trust Checking 

Fid. Cash Res. (J.W.P. Fund) 

Fid. Daily Income Trust 



1 


,601, 


.25 




171. 


,44 


2 


,180, 


.35 




886, 


.71 




707, 


.00 




25, 


.00 




20, 


.00 


s 


,591, 


,75 




502, 


.27 


1 


,797, 


.40 


5 


,719, 


,99 


IS 


,345, 


,73 


2 3 


,375, 


,39 



54 



HOUSING COMMISSION 

John R. Benson 

Katherine S. McHugh 

Richard D. Paris 

William B. Russell 

Elizabeth J. Snelling, Chairman 



Chapter 359 of the Acts of 1979 empowered the Town to establish 
a Housing Commission "... to acquire land, including buildings there- 
on, to construct, renovate, reconstruct, equip, furnish, rent, man- 
age, maintain or sell land or buildings, or any portions of such land 
or buildings, at a location or locations to be selected by said town 
for the purpose of providing housing for persons of low and moderate 
income and others whose needs may be identified from time to time", 
and further authorized the Town to appropriate money not in excess of 
$2,500,000 for such purposes. 

By overwhelmingly approving the text of this Act before it was 
sent to the Legislature for enactment, the Lincoln Town Meeting demon- 
strated its support for providing some type of housing for people of 
moderate means in town. Accordingly, as soon as the Commission was 
established, it proceeded to consider (1) whether a housing develop- 
ment of some kind should indeed be constructed; (2) the most suitable 
location for such a development if it were to be built; (3) what 
kind of development would best fill the needs of the Town; and (4) 
how such a development should be designed so that it would be physi- 
cally attractive and an asset to the Town as well as to the neighbor- 
hood in which it would be located. 

After considerable intensive study, the Commission decided that 
a mixed income housing development was indeed needed in the Town, 
since housing costs were accelerating to the point where almost no 
moderately priced housing was any longer available in Lincoln. Be- 
cause of this fact, people reaching retirement age, coupled with 
income reduction, were being forced to look outside town for smaller, 
less expensive, places to live. New town employees could no longer 
find moderately priced housing in the town in which they work, and 
young professionals could no longer find affordable housing in Lin- 
coln. 

It was also determined that the Umbrello land (and a portion 
of the adjoining Donaldson property) was the best location for such 
a development, located as it is in relatively close proximity to 
shopping facilities and commuter rail services. (It is a matter 
of record that the Neighborhood Land Program and the Open Space Pro- 
gram had concluded, in their report to the Town of November, 1977, 

95 



that there were only seven parcels in Town suitable for mult i -family 
development. By early 1981, only two of these parcels were still 
undeveloped, of which one was the Umbrello parcel, with the other 
in the process of being planned by a private developer.) 

In addition, this land had the advantage of being available, 
since the Rural Land Foundation, which purchased the entire property 
in 1979, had at that time agreed to hold the 14.5 acre "core" parcel 
for a year in order to give the Town time to decide whether or not it 
wanted to acquire it for housing or other purposes. The RLF gener- 
ously agreed to extend this 1 year period to give the new Housing 
Commission time to decide whether the purchase of this land should 
be recommended. The Donaldson family also indicated its willing- 
ness to sell a portion of its land if the Town wished to purchase it 
for housing purposes. 

The Commission concluded the Town would prefer to retain as much 
local control as possible, and accordingly it was decided not to ask 
for any State or Federal funds for the project. The proposed devel- 
ment would contain a number of condominiums to be sold at market 
prices, with the profit from such sales being used to finance a num- 
ber of moderately priced condominiums and rental units. The only 
effect on the tax rate would be the cost of the purchase of the Um- 
brello land (approximately $100,000). 

A meeting of the Town was convened within the Annual Town Meet- 
ing in March of 1981 in order for the Commission to explain the con- 
cept of its proposed mixed income development. Questions followed 
the presentation. The only negative comment was on the proposed size 
of the project. (45 units proposed: 18 market rate condominiums, 
8 moderately priced condominiums, 14 moderately priced rental units 
and 5 market rate rental units.) 

However, considerable opposition was demonstrated when the speci- 
fic proposal was presented to a special Town Meeting in June. This 
opposition appeared to be divided into various groups: those who were 
opposed to any provision for moderate income housing by the Town, 
those who believed that the size of the project would have a detri- 
mental effect on the neighborhood, those who believed such a project 
should be constructed elsewhere, and those who simply did not under- 
stand the admittedly complicated financing arrangements for the pro- 
ject. Although a substantial amount of land (19 acres out of a total 
of approximately 26 acres) was to be kept as open space, an article 
was placed in the warrant for the Town Meeting by petition asking the 
Town to purchase the entire 14.5 acre Umbrello parcel for conservation 
purposes, thus ending once and for all the possibility of putting any 
housing on the property. 

96 



Although the housing proposal was defeated, so, too, was the 
request that this land be acquired for conservation purposes. The 
Commission interpreted this vote to mean that the Town as a whole 
believed that the project should be re-studied and refined in res- 
ponse to the concerns expressed, and brought back to a future Town 
Meeting for reconsideration. 

Since considerable opposition had centered on the size of the 
project, together with use of any portion of the Donaldson land, the 
fall was devoted to discussing ways of meeting these objections. An 
alternate plan was devised, which would provide for a 30-unit develop- 
ment to be located entirely on the Umbrello land, and which would 
contain 15 market priced condominiums, 5 moderately priced condo- 
miniums and 10 moderately priced rental units. (Approximately 10 
acres of the 14.5 acre parcel would be open space.) The Commission 
intends to discuss the two plans at a series of open meetings during 
the early winter of 1982 in an attempt to discover which plan has the 
most popular support, and to present to the 1982 Annual Town Meeting 
for consideration the plan more generally favored. 

Although a major portion of the Commission's time was spent on 
the mixed-income housing development, there were other accomplish- 
ments. In the summer, a statement of long-term goals was unanimous- 
ly adopted. These goals are as follows: 

(a) Present to the Town once more a proposal for a rela- 
tively small mixed income development on the Umbrello 
(and possibly) Donaldson land. Because of the fact 
that this site is unique in that it is one of only 
two tracts in Town which appear to be suitable for 
such a development, it is likely that this is the only 
multi-family development which will be proposed by the 
Commission. 

(b) Investigate the possibility of using the accessory 
apartment bylaw (perhaps amplified and made less cumber- 
some) to provide additional low and moderate income 
housing opportunities scattered throughout the Town. 

(c) Consider the possibility of acquiring moderately priced 
houses as they come on the market. 

(d) Check with the National Park (and the State Department 
of Public Works) to see if there are any remaining 
houses to be removed within the next few years which 
might be acquired by the Commission. 



97 



(e) Consider the possibility of creating an apartment in 
the Codman Farm House, which is presently owned by the 
Town, and is large enough to be divided. 

(f) Investigate the provisions of Section 8, whereby finan- 
cial assistance could be given to people wishing to 
rent apartments. 

(g) Look into the possibility of establishing a small con- 
gregate living center for senior citizens, similar to 
the ones constructed in Concord. 

A questionnaire has been sent to the owners of accessory apart- 
ments (39 in number), and the response appears to indicate that many 
owners either already do or would be willing to rent their apartments 
to people of low and/or moderate income. Recognizing the importance 
to homeowners of control over tenant selection, the Commission is 
now considering ways whereby the owners could retain some rights of 
selection while at the same time there would be assurances that the 
tenants qualify as of low and/or moderate income. 

In the fall, the Commission assumed responsibility for the two 
Tower Road houses (formerly Lunt and Campobasso) , which have been 
owned by the Town for some time. The Lincoln Foundation, which had 
previously leased these houses from the Town for rental to people of 
low and/or moderate income, informed the Selectmen in 1981 it in- 
tended to disband and could no longer maintain these houses. At the 
June special meeting, the Town authorized the Selectmen to turn over 
control of these houses to the Housing Commission, and further auth- 
orized the Commission to accept $10,000 from the Lincoln Foundation, 
this sum to be used to put these two houses into good condition. 
We are indeed grateful to the Lincoln Foundation for its generosity. 

Shortly before the end of the year, the Commission appointed an 
advisory committee, which will act as a sounding board for the Com- 
mission. The members are Susan Brooks, Ruth Ann Hendrickson, Alan 
McClennen, Samuel Mygatt and William Williams, Jr. We are grateful 
to these distinguished citizens for accepting this responsibility, 
and know that we will benefit greatly from their counsel. 

We are also grateful to Annie Clay Harris of Salem and Edward 
Collins, III, of Concord, who served as co-ordinator and architect 
respectively on the housing development, and who continue to devote 
time and effort on modifications of the plans for the development. 

We are also grateful to the various Town Boards, who have given 
us their unqualified support over this past year, and particularly 

98 



to the Planning Board, which generously made it possible for us to 
reimburse our consultants for their out of pocket expenses last 
spring. 

The entire Town owes a debt of gratitude to the Rural Land 
Foundation and to the members of the Donaldson family for their 
willingness to make their land available to the Town if it appeared 
to be in the public interest. 

And last of all, we are grateful for the continued public in- 
terest in housing generally. As long as this public interest con- 
tinues, we are hopeful that 1982 will mark the beginning of a gen- 
erally accepted way of providing some form of alternative housing 
in Lincoln, particularly for our own residents and their offspring, 
who may need such housing either now or in the foreseeable future, 
as well as for Town employees who may wish to live in Lincoln. 



99 



ENERGY COMMITTEE 

Becky Bart ov i cs 

Margarel Hubbard 

ion i s.i Rand 

Pamela R< 

Judith Spear 

Pet er Rot hste In , Cha i rman 

198] was the first full year of the Energy Commit tee' s work, and 
najor Strides have been taken to reduce the town's energy consumption. 
Our efforts have been directed towards residential scr. well 
as municipal projects, but our primary concern to date has been to 
reduce energy consumption in town buildings, and we are currently 
preparing an article for the 1982 Town Meeting to authorize expendi- 
tures for energy-related capital improvements. 

To arrive at a list of recommended improvements for town buildings, 
the Energy Committee applied for, and received a combined state and 
federal grant to hire an engineer to conduct Technical Assistance 
Energy Audits on seven town buildings. This $8,000 grant was awarded 
in the fall, and the audits were completed in December, 1981. Audits 
had been conducted the year before on the Smith and Brooks Schools, 
so the Energy Committee is now able to prepare recommendations for 
these buildings as well as Town Hall, the Library, Center School, the 
Fire and Police Station, the DPW Garage, Sandy Pond Pump Station and 
the Hartwel 1 School . 

The proposal being prepared for Town Meeting will recommend 
issuing a bond to pay for these capital improvements. We are getting 
assistance from the Massachusetts Municipal Association in determin- 
ing the best method for financing these improvements. The items being 
recommended will all have a pay-back period of less than seven years, 
and since they will be paid for over approximately ten years, they 
will save the town money from the moment they are installed. 

Following Town Meeting we will be turning our attention to some 
other areas of town energy expenditures. Street 1 ights and water pumps 
are two large users of electricity, and we have explored some of the 
options for reducing their consumption. The town is currently a 
partner in a suit against Boston Edison to have the rate structures 
for street 1 ight ing, and hopefully other off-peak uses lowered to 
reflect their true cost to the utility. Depending on the outcome of 
this suit, the Energy Committee will be preparing a plan for the change 
and/or removal of some street lights, and we hope that off-peak rates 
for water pumping will become more economical. 

The Energy Committee held four residential energy workshops in 
1981. The topics included solar energy, wood heat, wood lot manage- 
ment, and do-it-yourself energy projects. These were all well attended, 
and we plan to continue a residential information program in the 
coming year. We are exploring different options for encouraging 
residential energy improvements, and we are open to suggestions for 
different types of projects. 

100 



The spring of 1982 will be a time when the Energy Committee will 
be exploring options for a variety of local projects. We have com- 
piled a list of over twenty different possible projects, and this 
spring we will be setting some near-and-long-term goals for the 
Committee. The projects under consideration range from methods for 
providing information to residents, to sponsorship of solar energy 
and energy efficient demonstration projects, development of small- 
scale local energy resources, and the establishment of a materials 
cooperative to bring down the cost of residential energy improvements, 

As the town's energy management capabilities become more refined 
and efficient, there will be more time to turn our attention to some 
of these projects. The Energy Committee welcomes suggestions and 
comments on our efforts to date, and we hope that any individuals 
who are as excited as we are about some of possibilities for local 
projects will contact us and lend their assistance. 



101 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Stuart B. Avery 

John R. H. Kimball, Clerk 

Frederick M. Tingley, Chairman 

During 1981, the Board received authorization for a new well and 
a tank to replace the open pressure basin. 

New Well at Farrar Pond 



The comprehensive water system analysis by the Board's consulting 
engineers, Perkins-Jordan, was completed early in the year. With the 
support of the report's recommendations, the Board planned annual Town 
Meeting articles for funding for a tank to replace the pressure basin, 
as required by State order, for water main improvements, and for a new 
well at Farrar Pond. Because the Board was not ready to address the 
complex issues involved, the first two articles were passed over for 
discussion at a later meeting. The Town Meeting appropriated $275,000 
for the new well. The Board then applied to the State Department of 
Environmental Quality Engineering for approval of the restrictions on 
the use of the land within 400 feet of the wellsite. A hearing was 
held by the Department on July 9, 1981, the Department later issued a 
conditional approval, and at year end the Board was attempting to 
obtain the additional restrictions required. In the meantime, the 
bidding process was begun. 

In-ground Pressure Tank on Town Hill 

On June 18, 1981, a Special Town Meeting appropriated $700,000 
for a concrete in-ground tank to replace the 100 year old open pressure 
basin on Town Hill settling a controversy that had existed for well 
over ten years. The Board had agreed that the height of the tank 
would not exceed six feet over the existing basin elevation and that 
it would have a flat roof. The Board subsequently decided to construct 
a tank of about 1.48 million gallons capacity, with a diameter of 
about 110 feet and a depth of about 20 feet. No substantial savings 
were anticipated if a smaller tank were built now, and another tank 
were later built on the same site. At year end, the Board had begun 
the bidding process on the tank. 

Other Matters 

The Board installed improved chemical injection equipment at 
Tower Road well, as authorized in 1979, at a cost of about $25,000. 
Replacement of the main pump at Sandy Pond was required as a result of 
failure of very old equipment. Water rates were increased about 27% 
with the fall billing, and connection charges were increased during 
the year, in anticipation of expenses for the new well and tank. The 
Board continued to benefit throughout the year from the abilities and 
dedication of the Town Engineer, Frank Emmons, and Water Department 
and other Town employees. 

102 



STATISTICS FOR 1981 





Beginning 
of Year 


Added 


End of Year 


Miles of main 


43. 


60 


3,766 


3,809.60 


Hydrants in use 


374 




7 


381 


Gates in use 


503 




10 


513 


Blow-offs 


36 




4 


40 


Services in use 


1,430 




15 


1,445 



1981 construction projects were: 

Oak Meadow 

Davison Drive 

Brooks Hill 

New road off Sandy Pond 

Mr. § Mrs. Schiemann (off Silver Hill) 



103 



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104 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Richard P. Carroll, Superintendent 

In the past year, the Department of Public Works has accomplished 
the following projects: 

1. Surface treatments using stone chip were applied to the 
following town streets: 

A. Old County Road, Trapelo Road to Route 2 

B. Page Road, Trapelo Road to Davison Drive 

C. Baker Bridge Road, Carroll School to Concord Road 

2. Set and regrade catch basins on Bedford Road in the vicinity 
of Town Hall. 

3. Install stone barrier to prevent cars from parking along Old 
County Road. 

4. Reshape and prepare landfill for final lift. 

5. Repair drainage, intersection of Farrar Road and Concord Road. 

6. Construction of an addition to the Tower Road Well House to 
accomodate lime feed equipment. 

7. Painting of all fire hydrants throughout the town. 

8. The seasonal mowing of the town ballfields. 

9. The completion of 4000 ft± of the Brooks Road Bicyle Path. 

10. Installation of a septic system at the Public Works Building 
to replace the existing system which had failed. 

11. Upgrading of the bathrooms in the Public Works Building. 

12. Dewatering of the Pressure Reservoir to permit soil testing. 

13. Installation of six test wells at the town landfill for the 
future testing of the ground water. 

In addition to the preceeding special projects, the department has 
made an attempt to comply with all requests and work orders that have 
been submitted. 

Again I wish to express my appreciation to all for their assistance 
in the execution of my duties. 



105 



TREE WARDEN 

Russell L. Barnes 

1981 was as 1980 dominated by the scourge of the Gypsy Moth. 
Large areas of the town were severely defoliated. However, recent 
inspection of these areas reveal low egg mass counts, giving hope 
that the worst may have passed. Tree mortality, especially along 
roadsides, has been substantial . Over one hundred fifty roadside 
trees have died and will have been removed this winter. A similar 
number of ttces are expected to die in the coming year. Oak and 
especially white oak were the hardest hit. 

Tree planting was accomplished this past spring with the planting 
of 13 Dr. Merrill Magnolias along the west side of Lincoln Road at 
the edge of the open field adjacent to Codman Farm. The Dr. Merrill 
Magnolia has an upright growth habit usually with a central stem. 
It matures to a height of about forty feet while displaying a small 
white blossom in early spring. 

At the westbound commuter platform 19 trees were planted, 15 
White Angle Crab apples and 4 Bradford Pears. Both have white blossoms 
in spring though the Bradford Pear peaks about 10 days before the 
Crabs . 

This past fall a rail fence was installed along the platform. 
Made of pressure treated lumber, this fence will protect a ground 
cover which will be planted on the slope from the ravages of commuter 
feet . 

Tree plantings during 1982 will be very limited because of the 
lack of funds to purchase plant material resulting from the sourge 
of Proposition 2\. 

The elms in and around Pierce Park still receive maximum protection 
from Dutch Elm Disease and at this time appear to be in good shape. 
However, constant vigilance is a necessity to insure the continued 
well being of these magnificent elms. 

Finally, the Tree Warden wishes to thank the DPW and Conservation 
Commission staff for their generous support in making Lincoln a 
pleasant place to live. 



106 



PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 



Joanna Bradshaw 

Lynn Donaldson 

Maragret Flint 

Margot Lindsay 

Aulikki Olsen 

William Shea 

John B. French, Chairman 

Kerrie Luce, Pierce House Manager 

In its new suit of clothes and with more thermal underwear, the 
Pierce House had a most active and productive year. The renovations 
voted by the Town at the 1980 Annual Meeting were completed late in 
the year and for 1981 there was a full schedule of meetings and 
parties, and a record number of weddings. This can be seen by the 
list of activities below, and also by the 25% increase in revenues 
for use of the House (only part of which relects an increase in 
usage fees). The financial statements printed elsewhere in this 
report also show another direct effect of the 1980 renovations, 
specifically the installation of storm windows, insulation and more 
heating zones - an absolute reduction in the cost of heating the 
Pierce House over the prior year, despite increased natural gas 
prices. 

Throughout the year we have been most ably and cheerfully served 
by Kerrie Luce, the Pierce House Manager, who has complete charge 
of the House arrangements (and whose activities extend to officiating 
as a justice of the peace at some of the weddings). We are also 
most grateful to the Conservation Commission rangers and town police, 
who effectively and, where necessary, sternly keep the peace in the 
Park, when the call of the wild - and sometimes other spirits - 
occasionally get the better of a small minority of Park users. 

We continue to believe the Park and the House are valuable assets 
for the Town to use and share with others under regulations which are 
as unobtrusive and uninhibiting as they reasonable can be. 



107 



1981 Activities 

Weddings: 22 resident 

30 non resident 

Meetings and parties: 93 

A sampling: Retirement parties 



Garden Club Mower Show 
Minutemen Monthly Meetings 
Council on Aging Monthly Meetings 
Council on Aging - 60 Plus Clinic- 
Council on Aging - Glaucoma Clinic 
Old Town Hall Annual Meeting 
Codman Community Farm Annual Meeting 
Lincoln Land Trust Annual Meeting 
Historical Society Yearly Tea 
Hartwell School - K-l Picnic 



108 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Marjorie L. Holland 

H. Arnold MacLean 

James DeNormandie, Chairman 

Agents: Warren F. Flint 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 

The general improvement of the Lexington Road Cemetery has 
continued. The entire area at the back of the cemetery has been 
regraded, while the center portion has been successfully seeded and 
lots laid out. The area along the western boundary has been partially 
cleared up and some lots should be available soon. Further tree work 
has been completed on the large oaks and pines. Old cemetery stones 
which showed weathering have been carefully treated with Eccobond 
paste to seal off cracks and should stand up well for years to come. 
The new northerly section will be cleared of fallen branches and 
accumulated brush. We plan to begin a program of resurfacing roads 
to bring them back into more acceptable condition. It is intended 
to continue the long standing policy of maintaining neat, simple 
country cemeteries. 

In closing we would like to pay tribute to Vincent N. Merrill, 
who retired from the Commission at the last Town Meeting after serving 
helpfully for many years. His professional landscape planning 
experience has been of great value at all times. 

There have been 17 interments during the year, which includes 
the interment of ashes. Twelve lots were sold during this same period, 



109 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John Carman 
Robert A. Cunningham 
I.lizabeth C. Donaldson 
Aulikki I.. Olsen, resigned 
Colin L. M. Smith 
Sumner Smith, resigned 
Paul Marsh, Chairman 

The greatest achievement this year was the establishment of the 
Lincoln Historic District by vote of the Town at Annual Town Meeting 
in March. Members of the Historical Commission worked with the 
Historic District Study Committee to prepare the inventory of build- 
ings and structures, to hold required public hearings, and after the 
vote to prepare a map and listing of buildings for filing at th? 
Middlesex County Registry of Deeds. Thanks are due to Margaret P. 
Flint for cartography. The Historic District consists of three areas: 
Lincoln Center, Woods End and Codman Estate. Complete inventories 
and maps are on file with the Planning Board and at the Archives 
'Room at the Public Library. The Lincoln Historic District has been 
approved by the Attorney General of the Commonwealth. 

The Commission appointed Robert A. Cunningham to represent it 
on the Library Archives Committee. This committee has been formulat- 
ing methods and policies pertaining to the historical collections at 
the library. 

The Commission appointed Gordon Donaldson to the Selectmen's 
Flagpole Committee. 

Future plans of the Commission include investigation of so-call- 
ed "Mutiple Resource Listing" with the Massachusetts Historical Com- 
mission for further protection of buildings and structures in Lincoln; 
publication of historical research papers which have been written by 
some Lincoln citizens; encouragement of teaching about our local 
history at schools and through other means. 

There were two resignations from the Commission: Auli-kki Olsen 
and Sumner Smith. They were replaced by John Carman and Colin L.M. 
Smith, both of whom qualify by their professions to also serve on 
the Historic District Commission. 

A historic event of note occurred at the Special Town Meeting in 
June when Moderator David M. Donaldson spoke in honor of Sumner Smith, 
noting that his retirement from the Historical Commission marks the 
end of sixty-five years of service to the Town on many different 
boards and committees. The Lincoln Histoiical Commission salutes 
Sumner Smith! (and greatly regrets that he has resigned). 



110 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

John Carman 

Basil Chigas 

Robert Cunningham 

Elizabeth Donaldson 

Guy Guarino 

Colin Smith 

Paul Marsh, Chairman 

Kenneth Hurd, Alternate Member 
Kim Kassner, Alternate Member 

The Historic District Commission held an organizing meeting in 
September at which Paul Marsh was elected chairman; John Carman, vice- 
chairman; and Elizabeth Donaldson, recording secretary. On 24 
November, the Commission held a public hearing on reconciling its 
sign regulations with those of the new Town sign by-law and on assign- 
ing blanket precedence to the public view from Lincoln Road over all 
others. As a result of the hearing, the Commission voted that the 
regulations and procedures of the Town sign by-law would apply to 
the District and that determination of precedence among public views 
would be made case by case. By the time this report is published, 
the Commission will have completed a study of forms and procedures 
for applications and certificates for construction projects within 
the District. 



Ill 



LINCOLN HISTORIC DISTRICT 



1 ) Lincoln Center 

2) Codman Estate 
(3) Woods End 




112 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Directors 

Margaret Marsh, President 
Clifton Rice, Clerk 
Roy Raja, Treasurer 
Clifford Bowles 
Russell Craig 
Louise Davy 
Warren Flint, Jr. 
Robert Henderson 
David Hill 
• Littleton Meeks 
Susan Stason 
John Solman 

Farmer-Manager 

Mary Sawyer 

CCF began its 1981 season with a complete farmer turnover, Dennis 
O'Neill, assistant farmer, arrived April 1st and worked diligently 
on farm equipment, readying for the planting season. Mary Sawyer, 
farmer-manager, arrived May 25th to find several projects already 
underway. Two loyal and hard-working Lincoln youths returned for 
another summer at Codman Farms. The somewhat small crew worked hard 
and completed a satisfactory season. With the help of five new 
Lincoln faces at the Codman stands, CCF managed to grow and sell 
almost all of its produce. .. (the exception was the bumper crop of 
pumpkins which greatly outweighed Halloween demand in the area). 

Farm sales were down because of no pig project, some corn 
failing to mature and pumpkin blight. Next year sales should 
increase with an expanded lamb project, a pig project, and an 
enlarged market garden. Raspberries also look promising for next 
season with more extensive pick-your-own and wholesale sales. 

Payroll in 1981 decreased from 1980 as the farm ran with one 
year-round farmer, three full-time summer workers, and five stand 
workers. Next summer, the farm is scheduled to carry an increased 
staff, particularly grade-school Lincolnites, primarily because Of 
an expanded market garden project. 

CCF's project expansion is possible in part by the greatly 
appreciated gifts of a Ford pick-up truck and a Farmall tractor. 
Notably, the truck makes it possible for CCF to sell produce, not 
only to local markets , but also to Farmer's Markets in and around 
the Boston area. 



113 



Ihi lining crop was the Cannon Mold pumpkins. 

So tremendous was the yield that Lincolnites driving by t 1 
.it the Intersection of Weston and Silverhil] Roads enjoyed a solid 
sea ot" bright or.mge. Next season, Cannon Field will be planted 
with timothy and alfalfa; the pumpkins were planted Ln thai field 
for one year on 1 > as part of a crop rotation program. 

Other fields receiving "face-lifts" are Dean field and Culver 
Field. Dean, approximately four acres in size, was planted to timothy 
and alfalfa this past summer, for hay next season. Culver, approxim- 
ately seven acres, was plowed under after its hay crop was harvested 
last summer. Winter rye wqs then planted as a "green manure" to be 
in turn plowed under this coming spring. This management practice 
will add nutrients and organic matter to the soil to prepare for a 
planting of pumpkins and squash in May. 

The harvest season ended with great celebration and the Codman 
Fair in September. Despite a constant drizzle of rain, the fair 
proved to be just as much fun for young and old alike, even though 
the event was not as well attended as in sunny years past. The 
evenings of square dancing and lamb dinner were both sold out. 



114 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Balance Sheet 

November 30, 1981 and 1980 

Assets 



1981 



1980 



Current assets: 
Cash 

Accounts receivable 
Inventory 
Prepaid expenses 

Total current assets 

Property and equipment, at cost: 
Structures 

Motor vehicles and wagons 
Farm implements 

Less accumulated depreciation 

Net property and equipment 



$ 13,384 
2,568 
5,259 



21,221 



32,068 
19,807 


12,261 


$ 


33,472 





$ 11,000 

443 

5,731 

148 

17,322 



2,415 


2,771 


10,267 


10,267 


19,386 


19,281 



52,319 
16,996 



15,323 



$ 32,645 



Liabilities and Fund Balances 



Current Liabilities; 
Accounts payable 
Accrued expenses 



Total current liabilities 



Fund balances: 

Property and equipment fund 
Restricted fund 
Unrestricted fund 

Total fund balances 



$ 1,569 
500 



1,773 
795 





2,069 


2,568 




12,261 


15,323 




94 


108 




19,048 


14,646 




31,403 


30,077 


$ 


33,472 


52,645 





115 



CODM .in FARMS, 
Statenenl o\' Revenues, Expenses end Changes in Fund Bala 
years ended November 30. L981 and 



l 98 1 



L980 



Operating revenues: 

S.i i 

Hay 

Vegetable crops 

Livestock 

Custom work 

Purchased items resold 
Total sales 
Dues 

Garden plot fees 
Fai r 

U.S.O.A. cost sharing 
Education 
Interest 
Other 

Total operating revenues 



13,550 
5,180 
2,936 

3,747 
331 



17,811 
7,020 
4,778 
4,604 
1,914 



25,744 


36,127 


4,196 


3,893 


885 


1,269 


2,231 


2,838 


-- 


552 


-- 


362 


1,938 


543 


10 


16 



35,004 



45,600 



Operating expenses: 

Labor and related costs 

Seed and livestock 

Fertilizer and lime 

Repairs 

Depreciation 

Feed 

Rentals 

Supplies 

Fuel costs 

Insurance, taxes and fees 

Freight and utilities 

Legal and accounting 

Office supplies and expense 

Total operating expenses 

Operating loss 

\on-operating revenue (expenses): 
Unrestricted gift 
Restricted expenses 

Net non-operating revenue 

Excess revenues (expenses) 

Fund balances at beginning of year 

Fund balances at end of vear 



15,724 


26,617 


2,578 


3,578 


5,304 


6,220 


3,592 


2,731 


5,394 


3,477 


393 


2,427 


801 


1,512 


(40) 


735 


2,523 


2,200 


577 


523 


709 


622 


500 


795 


2,609 


1,607 


38,664 


53,004 



(3,660) 



(7,444) 





5,000 
(14) 
4,986 


5,000 
(11) 




4,989 




1,526 
30,0^8 


(2,455) 
32,533 


s 


51,403 


$ 30,078 



116 



FLAG POLE COMMITTEE 

Leo Algeo 

Martha DeNormandie 

Gordon A. Donaldson, Chairman 

The Flag Pole Committee has met on six occasions during the past 
summer and fall, one of these with the Trustees of the Lincoln Library. 
A report has also been circulated to the Lincoln Historical Commission, 
and a letter has been received from the Commander of the American 
Legion. The results of our study are as follows: 

SITE - After reviewing five possible sites we are unanimous in 
agreeing that the Center of Town, on the South-West corner of the 
Lincoln Library is the most suitable site. It should be near the 
building itself, 10 or 15 feet, and at a distance from the eagle. 
As one faces the building it preferably should stand to the right 
of the chimney, so as not to obscure the lettering on the chimney 
wall itself. 

TYPE - We favor a white fiberglass pole with an 8 or 9 inch base. 
Because of vandalism of flags and flagpoles in the past we favor 
internal halyards, which can be locked within the pole. The top 
pulley should be of a swivel type. 

HEIGHT - We believe a pole of 60 or 70 feet above ground level 
would be ideal. It need not be high, and 60 feet might be preferable. 
This would balance the height of the Library Tower, and it would fly 
in a very pleasing setting. In this position at this height the flag 
would be easily visible from Lincoln and Bedford Roads throughout 
the year, and from Trapelo Road (perhaps Weston Road) in the winter 
months. 

COST - We have contacted three flag pole manufacturers and a white 
dura-finish fiberglass pole of 60 feet ground level approximates 
$3,565.00 installed. One of 70 feet approximates $5,960.00 installed. 
Internal halyards increase the cost $250.00. 

Disposal of the old wood pole: A letter from Ernest Johnson, 
dated August 4, 1980, best describes the condition of the wooden pole. 
We also have correspondence from the Town of Tisbury, Vineyard Haven 
indicating an interest in our old pole. A sum of $2,000.00 has , been 
mentioned, but no set figure has been given. 

Telephone poles and overhead wires: Conversations have been had 
with the companies involved. It has been suggested that elimination 
of wires in front of the Library would greatly enhance the beauty of 
the flag setting and of the Center of Town itself. It is proposed 
that wires connecting Trapelo Road with Bedford Road be short-circuited 
up Library Lane. This would require the placing of at least two poles, 

117 



and would eliminate the wires running down Bedford Road to the W 
of the Library. The companies involved have been open to this suggest- 
ion. 

It would be ideal to inning across the Center, 

between the ends of Trapelo Road and Sandy Pond Road; but this would 
involve placing the wires underground -- a more complicated prob: 
But, we believe this possibility should be pursued vigorously. 

Library Shrubbery: The Library shrubs to the left and right of 
the South wall of the Library have long outgrown their decorative 
value. They are now trees, crowding the building. In order to make 
the setting for the flagpole described above ideal one trunk of a 
double tree to the right of the building should be removed. The 
Library Trustees are open to this suggestion and have agreed to this 
proposition. 

It is probable that some landscaping may be necessary in the area 
of the pole setting. A simple bench or two has been suggested. 

Our various sponsoring organizations have been kept aware of our 
deliberations, and in general are in agreement with our decisions - 
The American Legion, the Library Trustees, and the Historical Commission, 

Companies contacts: The Flag Center, and B. A. Larson S Co. 






Library, Recreation and Schools 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Term Expires 

Carolyn Birmingham School Committee Appointee 1982 

David Ford Self Perpetuating 
Nancy Hammond (resigned) 

Douglas Harding Self Perpetuating 
■ Kenton Ide (resigned) 

Mary Newman Self Perpetuating 

Robert Shenton Selectmen Appointee 1984 

Eleanor Fitzgerald, Chairman Elected by the Town 1983 

A WELL UTILIZED RESOURCE 

It is pleasing to report that 1981 has been another year of 
achievement for the Lincoln Public Library. Total circulation of 
books, records, and other materials exceeds that of any other year 
in the Library's ninety-eight year history. It is notable that new 
books represent thirty percent of our circulation. The 251 programs 
offered throughout the year attracted 5,344 people. Nearly 1000 
people came each week to the Library to borrow or browse through 
books and records, to read newspapers or periodicals, to attend a 
program or, perhaps, to make use of copying equipment. 

The staff well deserves commendation for its sense of commitment, 
ingenuity and resourcefulness in making the most of a tight budget. 
Selection of all materials and the planning of programs are done with 
great care. Due to staff efforts, the Library has been able to 
maintain an atmosphere that is both welcoming and efficient. 

CHANGES 

In Staffing 

The Children's Room was indeed sorry to lose the very capable 
services of Assistant Children's Librarian Margaret Sykes. We were, 
however, very fortunate that Catherine Brannen, who brings with her 
considerable education and experience in children's library services 
at the Watertown Public Library, accepted the position. The military 
transfer of her husband from Hanscom to Ohio required Frances Colvin 
to resign her post at the circulation desk. Pete Heijn now serves 
in that capacity. 

Board of Trustees 

Several changes have also occurred on the Board of Trustees. 
The Board of Selectmen appointed Robert Shenton to fill the vacancy 

119 



ted by the April resignation of Kenton ide. Nancy Hammond, who 

Douglas 
Harding was tppoil 111 th.it vacancy. 

Hi) n. dim; WD GROW 

Maintenance of our fine building and 11 grounds 

continues to have high priority. In addition to our excel! 
custodial help, the Trustees appreciate the efforts and interest 
of former trustee Francis (ileason, who serves as consultant in this 
respect and who can at times be observed fertilizing rhododendrons 
or scrutinizing the building for indications of decay. 

Progress continues to be made in energy conservation. Over a 
two year period oil consumption has been reduced from 5000 gallons 
to 3500 gallons. The continuing contribution to this effort of custod- 
ians John and Robert Bottino is evident. This year they have construct 
ed internal storm windows for the Children's Room and for all the 
casement windows of the library. Other helpful measures have been 
the acquisition of a new storm door for the exit by the staff 
room and the completion of acquisition of external storm windows. 
Modifications to the lighting system have reduced the number of 
kilowatts of electricity used. Every effort is made to turn off 
lights not in use. Numerous other small energy saving measures 
have been taken or are observed. 

Kith a view toward long term savings and improved service, the 
purchase and installation of a new telephone system was accomplished. 
The addition of a second line means callers to the library are less 
likely to receive a busy signal. 

Space limitations continue to present a challenge. The staff 
find lack of work space a growing hardship. Shelf space and spaces 
for records, tapes, and other materials are now at capacity. The 
collection cannot be expanded. Older books must be frequently and 
diligently weeded out so that new books can be added and the collec- 
tion kept up to date. Older, still useful, books are now stored in 
the attic and are available on request. The Children's Room is too 
small for the use it gets. Space to run adult as well as children's 
programs without interfering with other library functions is a 
need which should not be indefinitely ignored. 

The final word on the flag pole issue seems not to have been 
spoken in 1981, but sometime in the future the banner may yet wave 
somethwere o'er the lawn of the library. 

HISTORICAL ROOM 

The Historical Room news is that Mary Ann Hales is making 

progress in the ongoing task of organizing and cataloging the growing 

collection so that its usefulness to local historians will be en- 
hanced. 

120 



A number of groups now find the Historical Room an attractive 
space for small meetings. The Friday morning book discussion group, 
a "Dungeons and Dragons" Club, and some aspiring young philatelists 
use the room on a regular basis. 

PROGRAM AND SERVICES 

One of the highlights of 1981 was the November focus on the 1930's, 
In addition to the Walker Evans Exhibit, and a series of films about 
the thirties, was the special event co-sponsored by the Council on 
Aging, the Lincoln Historical Society, and the Library. David 
Donaldson served as moderator for "Lincoln in the Thirties". Panel- 
ists Helena Dee, Jim DeNormandie, Clifford Bowles, Warren Flint and 
Harland Newton delighted their audience with reminiscences of that 
era in Lincoln. 

The mainstay of the adult program continues to be the "Wednesday 
Morning at the Library" series which Ellen Cannon and Ethel Mackenzie 
have given of themselves to present for the past ten years. Monthly 
films shown on Thursday evenings continue to be popular. For the 
second summer a series of family films were shown during July and 
August. Films for older children and teenagers were offered during 
school vacation weeks. Poetry readings were held on many Monday 
evenings well into June. The Great Books discussion group, arranged 
by Joanna Hopkins and Mike Tannert, met on Wednesday evenings 
through spring. 

The bi-weekly Friday morning book club continues to thrive. 
Jay Daly and Ellen Sisco alternate in guiding the discussion. 
During the spring, the group focused on books by authors "south 
of the border". An authentic South American luncheon in March was 
a special event. This season the focus of discussion is books on 
Africa. 

In April, Children's Librarian Heddie Kent presented her annual 
children's play in the upper Town Hall. A cast of fifth graders 
dramatized "The Brave Little Tailor" with great aplomb. Mrs. Kent 
successfully continues to be the pied piper of children's literature 
enticing youngsters to the library with an extraordinary number of 
programs, story hours, crafts, and instructions on the Dewey Decimal 
System, as well as numerous appropriate films throughout the year. 
She is abetted in these activities by Mae Dollinger and Catherine 
Brannen. 

Books on tape are now available at the Library. This new 
service was established in response to patron requests. There are 
currently fifteen books on tape in the collection which is anticipated 
to grow gradually. 

A memorial fund established by Martha DeNormandie with a view 



121 



mg the 1 music collection has launched the new 
collection of music on tape. 

FRIENDS AND VOLUNTEERS 

Still ardently supportive after retiring as trustee, Martha 
also assumed the task of assembling the iriends of the Library, who 
now number 250. During this formative year, Silke Moss has served 
most graciously as president of the 1-riends. Spring activities 
included an Easter egg hunt on the library lawn and the annual book 
sale held in May. In November the Friends sponsored the Walker 
Ivans Lecture and month long exhibit. Epicurean desserts and wine 

provided for those attending the lecture. 

The services of volunteers, teenage pages, and the junior 
pages-in-training contribute much to the operation of the library 
and are indeed appreciated. Plants and flowers provided by the 
Garden Club add a cheerful accent. The donation of money, books and 
other appropriate materials throughout the year are gratefully 
received. These gifts and the continuing support of the library by 
the community bring great encouragement to the staff and the trustees 
in these challenging times. 

EXHIBITS 

The library has two small exhibit areas that it makes available 
to local artists and craftsmen for exhibit of their work. During 
1981 the exhibits included: 

DeN'ormandie Room: 

Sandra Bradley-Clark, stone sculpture; Marior Miller Cook, monoprints 
Laura Williams, collages; Talbot Lovering, photographs; Lee Weaver, 
photographs; Michael Reece, oils; Walker Evans, photographs from the 
1930' s; Dave Chase, photographs. 

Lincoln Historical Room: 

"Lost Lincoln", a photographic look at buildings no longer part 
of Lincoln's landscape, prepared by Jack McLean. 



122 



WEDNESDAY MORNINGS AT THE LIBRARY 
1981 

Organized and hosted by Ellen Cannon and Ethel Mackenzie 



January 14 
February 11 

March 11 

April 8 

May 13 
October 14 

November 4 



'Colonial Wills and Inventories" 

'U.S. Economic Problems, Solvable 
and Insolvable" 

'Country Houses, an Architects* s 
Camera Abrod" 

'Show Me the Way to Go Home, an 
Animal Orientation" 

'Overland to Kathmandu" 

'Songs and Tales in Romania" 



"Guest of the King of Bhutan" 



Betty Little 

Lester Thurow 

Richard Reece 

Bruce Hunter 

Ellen Sisco 

Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional H.S. 
Select Chorus 

Victor Lutnicki 



123 






1981 



Jay Daly 
Ellen Si 
Heddie Kent 
Marjorie Snyder 
Catherine Brannen 
Ma ry i r* i n 
Phyl l i s NacParl and 
Audrey Dedinsky 
Nancy Gregory 
Pete Heijn 
Mae Pol linger 
John Bottino 
Robert Bottino 



I i hi a i i. in 

• i Librarl an 
Chi Ldren ' 

n i ca l Servi cea i Lbrarlan 

t ant Children's Librarian 
Library Technician 

Senior Library Assistant/Bookkeeper 
Typi st 

Circulation Assistant 
Circulation Assistant 
Chi 1 d rend 's Room Aide- 
Custodian 
Custodian 



HOURS - 1981 



Monday, Wednesday 
Tuesday, Friday 
Saturday 



Thursday 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except during 
July and August - closed 



Library Pages 1981 



Library Volunteers 1981 



Kevin Algeo 
Lucy Birkett 
Stephen Birmingham 
Michael Corcoran 
Karen Dawes 
Kate Elwood 
Paul Fitzgerald 
Peter Flint 
Shanna Green 
Jennifer Hoagland 
Rachel Keevil 
Charity King 
Steven Levey 
Shauna Lo 
Anne Meriam 
Caroline Murphy 
Elisa Sartori 
Abel Tong 
Betsy Tong 
Anne Touborg 
l-.ric Willman 
Karen Zuelke 



Anne Althausen 
P. J. Birmingham 
Cindy Carroll 
Carolyn Caswell 
Anna Davy 
Ellie Donaldson 
Lucie Flint 
Helen Healy 
Hans Hollister 
Nicky Koehler 
Rebecca Loud 
Kim Lyons 
Suzanne McKay 
Dorothea Murphy 
Isabel Peirce 
William Poisson 
Nicole Ritchie 
Louise Rogers 
Cheryl Van Horn 
Laurie White 



124 



The Library is grateful to the many people who gave books and 
records to support the collection during the year. They include: 



Robbie Abele 
Carl Anderson 
Mrs. L. B. Anderson 
Carol K. Anthony 
Dr. Balogh 
Elaine Banks 
Joyce Bent ley 
Carolyn Birmingham 
Eleanor Hope Bovey 
Antoinette Brask 
Martin Buerger 
Jane Butler 
Louise Butts 
Mary Brogna 
Cannon Family 
Carol Caswell 
Elizabeth Cherniak 
Marcia Ciaramaglia 
J. Clement 
Lucy Cole 
Betty Cope 
Joanna Crawford 
Jay Daly 
Alexandra Dane 
DeBaryshe Family 
Martha DeNormandie 
Mrs. Deterling 
Laurel Dickey 
Mae Dollinger 
E. Donaldson 
Dowse Family 
Ross Finney 
Al Fullerton 
Mrs. Greenberger 
MaryAnn Hales 
Lisa Hamilton 
Nancy Hammond 
Hapgood Family 
Evelyn Harris 
Harwood Family 
Elaine Hawkes 
R. A. Hendrickson 
M. Hubbard 
Mary Irwin 
Mrs. K. Johnson 
Leila Joseph 
Mrs. Martin Kahn 
Mrs. Kasparian 



Mrs. Kolligian 

Mr. Kolodny 

John Lee 

Ann Lesser 

Galen Light 

Nancy Lin 

Dunbar Lockwood 

Loud Family 

Dr. Luft 

McArdle Family 

Hester McCune 

McCurdy Family 

Peg Marsh 

Marda Mayo 

Anne Meriam 

Ruth Morey 

Drs. William £ Ruth Murphy 

Mrs . Nardone 

Charlotte Phillips 

Kris Pastoriza 

Annette Pickett 

Mrs. Paul Plant 

Mr. Poisson 

Roy Raja 

J. Ressler 

Mr. Risch 

Mrs . Robey 

Evelyn Rogers 

Henry Rugo 

Clement Sawtell 

Mr. £ Mrs. Schwann 

Enid Sechel 

Mrs. Robert Segal 

N. Shiras 

Ellen Sisco 

Mary Spindler 

Margaret Sykes 

Mr. 5 Mrs. E. Taylor 

Mr. & Mrs. F. Taylor 

M. Tlumacki 

Ted Tucker 

Mrs. Von Mertens 

H. S. Van Bur en 

Ruth Walkey 

Mrs. Patricia Warner 

Mrs. Wengren 

Bella Wheeler 

Ross Whitman 



125 



Jamie Wheelock Robert S. Woodbury 

Mrs. Khitmore Grahame Yeuell 

Jane Williams 

Magazine Gift Subscriptions were received from the following 
people: 

Mrs. L. B. Anderson Dr. Luft 

Dr. Balogh M. Naiman 

Book Affair Inc. Roy Raja 

Elizabeth Cope Bella Wheeler 

Ruth Hapgood Ross Whitman 
Mr. Kolodny 

The Library greatly appreciated gifts that have been received 
during the past year from the following people and others: 

Friends of the Lincoln Library 

Lincoln Players 

Martha DeNormandie 

Francis H. Gleason 

Mr. S Mrs. William T Payne 

Lester Thurow 



126 



STATISTICS - 1981 

General 

Number of days open 291 

Fines Collected $3,410.16 

Acquisitions 
Books 

Inventory 1980 54,494 

Purchases 2,688 
Gifts 387 

Total Inventory 57,569 

Discarded or Lost 1,355 

Inventory 1981 56,214 

Books on Tape 15 

Records and Tapes 

Inventory 1980 2,336 
Purchases 170 

Gifts 65 

Total Inventory 2,571 
Discarded or lost 31 

Inventory 1981 2,540 

Circulation 

Adult Books 45,306 

Children's Books 28,659 

Total Books 73,965 

Records and Tapes 4,929 

Misc. - periodicals, rentals, passes etc. 3,849 

Total all material 1981 circulation 82,743 

Programs 

Adult programs 65 

Children's programs 125 

Non-Library groups 61 

Total programs 251 

Program Attendance 

Adult 1,645 

Juvenile 2,885 , 
Non- Library Groups 814 

Total attendance 5,344 



127 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

tret L. Nengren, Presidenl 
John a. Pike, Vice Presidenl and I 
John h. Cant Lin, Treasurer 
Owen Beenhouwer 
Chesl er C, d 'Aut n-mont 

Walter Salmon 
Dorothy Thompson 

Robert Allen (ex officio) 
Muffie Fernald (ex officio) 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

The DeCordova turned a corner in 1981. An extraordinarily staff 
maintained an operative Museum after Bill Bagnall's departure to 
return to his own business commitments. Then, on March 30, David H. 
Katzive officially assumed his duties as Director following his appoint- 
ment by the Board of Trustees in December 1980. He had made several 
visits earlier in the year to become acquainted with the staff and to 
give much needed advice. 

It was bound to be "a hard act to follow" Fred Walkey who was mid- 
wife, inspiration and nurturor of the DeCordova, but the Trustees felt 
that David H. Katzive had the training and qualifications to take the 
Museum around the corner and offer the leadership and vitality its 
30-year standard of excellence requires. He came to us from the 
Brooklyn Museum where he had been Assistant Director for Education and 
Program Development, and previously had been associated with the 
Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art. 
The Trustees are confident that David will continue innovative admin- 
istration and highest quality programming, and respond to Lincoln's 
interests as well as those of the larger community the Museum serves. 
His experience in theatre, television and video, provide him with 
important viewpoints for the Museum of the 1980's. We are also pleased 
that he emphasizes the fact that the DeCordova and Dana is Park as well 
as Museum, and the grounds are especially significant to him. 

You will notice a change in terminology to conform with the usage 
of the American Association of Museums, which allocates boards of 
'directors" to business, and refers to the board members of non-profit 
institutions as "trustees." Thus, the DeCordova is governed by the 
Board of Trustees and David H. Katzive is the Director. 

There are other changes under consideration. Last year's Long 
Range Goals report pointed the way to this year's top priority, the 
re-structuring of the Board of Trustees. Since 90% of the DeCordova's 
funds (exclusive of the endowment) come from outside Lincoln, it would 
seem to be time to give these supporters a vote in policy making. 
Accordingly, a Task Force on Governance was appointed by the Trustees, 
with John Pike to organize it. He asked to work with him Ken Bergen, 
Jack Wofford, whom he designated Chairman, and Lee Harrison of Lincoln; 
Rob Allen of Weston, current Chairman of the Business Council; and 
Lorraine Massa of Bedford, ex-Chairman of the Associate Council. The 

128 



group has met diligently all Fall and has submitted a report to the 
Trustees. Its recommendations will constitute and Article in the 
Warrant of the March 1982 Town Meeting. In brief, the Task Force 
recommended enlarging the governance of the DeCordova to a maximum of 
21 Trustees, a minority to be non-Lincoln residents. There will be 
an open hearing to discuss in depth the issues prior to Town Meeting. 

Other re-structuring has added advisory committees to implement 
the work of the Board. Heretofore there was only an assignment of the 
Trustee to supervise Buildings and Grounds and report to the Board. 
John Cantlin ably handled these concerns. Because he has recently 
become Treasurer of the Museum, Owen Beenhouwer has assumed this 
responsibility. Walter Salmon, former Treasurer, has been asked to 
chair a Finance Committee. Serving with him are John Cantlin, Treasur- 
er; John Pike, Vice President; and Sid Brunnell, CPA (non-Lincoln resi- 
dent). The Committee will review a) policy on investments, endowments 
and restricted funds b) accounting procedures c) Museum budget as 
prepared by staff d) financial performance of Museum and e) annual audit 

A Fund Raising Committee was appointed with the President of the 
Board serving as Chairman. Presently the members are Janet Daniels, 
Chester d'Autremont and Elliott Grabill of Lincoln; Caroline Collings 
of Stow, past Chairman of the Associate Council; and Ron Massa of 
Bedford. The group is charged to discuss with the Finance Committee 
the Museum's annual budget and guidelines for future budgets in light 
of fund raising opportunities. They will review fund raising policy: 
a) annual appeals b) capital campaigns c) gifts from individuals 
d) approaches to foundations and e) special fund raising events. They 
will make personal contacts to assist fund raising efforts, and advise 
board and staff on internal fund raising efforts. 

The Fund Raising Committee will also review candidates for the 
position of Development Director, who will be an important and integral 
member of the Museum's administration in these days of enormous insti- 
tutional competition for funding. Though the prospects of federal 
money is brighter than in the early months of the Reagan administration, 
the DeCordova, like all non-profit institutions must seek new sources 
of revenue as well as implement established ones. The Museum remains 
grateful to the 350 Lincoln residents who support it with their 
memberships and to the 165 who contribute to its annual appeal. We 
can't get along without you! 

A Lincoln institution is an important backer, for the Codman 
Trust continues to give $10,000 annually to support the wonderfully 
appreciated summer concerts. This year 12,566 people attended 17 
events, whose diversity and excellence are due to Gayle Rich's 
discerning selections. 

The brand new gift to our programming came from Waltham neighbors 
when the Cronin family gave $5,000 to institute an annual lecture 
series in memory of Paul J. Cronin. The first Cronin event was a 
symposium in December, at which five distinguished speakers examined 
the artistic and political climate of the 1950's in conjunction with 
the "Being and Nothingness" exhibition. 



129 



The Board did not forget the quality of the DeCordova ' s great 
asset, its own paintings, sculpture and graphic work. A Collections 
Committee was appointed and a policy for them to follow was formulated. 
The basic statement says, "The primary emphasis of this collection 
shall be on works created since 1940; and on works created by New 
England artists. The Museum shall also collect works of art which 
refer to a New England context; and works related to the activities 
of the Museum's benefactor, Julian deCordova." The Collections 
Committee, chaired by Rob Allen, includes Chester d'Autremont, Owen 
Beenhouwer, Walter Salmon and Dorothy Thompson. The Director, of 
course, attends all the committee meetings. 

The Board also adopted a policy on Museum Ethics and confirmed 
the DeCordova's position on non-discriminatory practices. If it 
sounds as though the DeCordova administration and governance are 
becoming more structured, it is so. Today's rules of museumship are 
increasingly demanding and fortunately David Katzive is actively 
involved with professional museum associations and can steer us 
through the involved requirements for accreditation and accomplishment. 

We have had to slow down on a significant need for the DeCordova, 
that of physical improvements and additional space. Stan Heck's barn 
is much appreciated for some of our storage requirements. Adjustments 
for the handicapped still must come, but the 504 government strictures 
are in abeyance while all institutions seek the money to conform to 
them. The need for more exhibition space, particularly for our 
permanent collection, must await the right timing for a capital fund 
drive. 

The School continues to be a mainstay of the DeCordova. Eleanor 
Lazarus is proving a most competent Assistant Director for Education 
and has a fine, though scarcely adequate in size, staff to make the 
whole complex work. School registration was 3,188 for the year. 
Tuition has had to go up as well as the cost of art supplies at the 
store. The variety of courses and the quality of the teaching remain 
superior. 

The Board has given a lot of thought to problems of membership, 
what the various categories should cost and who will use them. It is 
an important "marketing" study as membership has been declining. We 
do feel strong enough, in volunteer and staff support, to renew June 
festivals which provide proven esprit and pleasure for people who 
love the DeCordova. 

There have been changes within the Board as Terry d'Autremont 
wished to pass on the Presidency after serving during the DeCordova's 
most critical period. His sensitivity to people-relationships, along 
with his abiding concern for the welfare of the institution, gave the 
Board a sense of cohesiveness and purpose. Walter Salmon also relin- 
quished his job as Treasurer. For nine years he masterminded the 
Museum's fiscal concerns and brought practical financial structure 
to a creative institution. Both Terry and Walter deserve real thanks. 



150 



In our supporting cast there have also been changes. Lorraine 
Massa gave unstinted caring to her job as Chairman of the Associate 
Council and passed the responsibilities to Muffie Fernald of Acton, 
a veteran do-whatever-needs-to-be-done volunteer for the Museum. 
Howard McMahon succeeded Kenneth Germeshausen as Chairman of the 
Business Council in 1979 and those two men showed what corporate 
support can mean to a museum. Howard turned over work to Rob Allen 
this year, but his interest and encouragement stay with us. Obviously 
these Chairmen of Councils could not function without he dedication of 
their members. Devoted volunteers and beyond-the-call-of-duty staff 
make the DeCordova viable. Joan Kennedy, as Assistant to the Director, 
deserves special mention. 

The accompanying Treasurer's Report shows that we have operated 
with a balanced budget and increased our assets but do carry a larger 
indebtedness to the bank than we like. We are turning a financial 
corner as we begin to have renewed income from grants and to pursue 
organized development for other funding. 

I think I can speak for the Board of Trustees in saying that we 
are trying to plan for DeCordova 's future as well as present. David 
Katzive decided to have the 1982 June festival devoted to the Future, 
and we think that's just right. David's own report of 1981 activities 
follows. 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 



In 1981 the DeCordova continued to thrive as a result of the 
vigorous support of its members and friends in Lincoln. This pheno- 
menon was most apparent at the openings, concerts, and special events 
where healthy crowds of people gathered to celebrate or enjoy the 
range of programs offered by the Museum. The most "Lincolnesque" 
events included: a February "Evening with Julian," admirably staged 
by the Lincoln Players and coordinated by Ellen Faran; and our June 
kick-off concert/benefit with the Herb Pomeroy Orchestra. 

The year was highlighted by the curatorial brilliance of Sherry 
Lang's "Class Routes" exhibition; the consummate planning skill and 
warmth brought to the Art School by Ellie Lazarus; the victorious 
battle against gypsy moths conducted by Rob Whitaker; the continued 
cleverness and ingenuity of Frank Balduf as Buildings Manager; a 
successful annual appeal coordinated by Angela Gillen; a corporate 
program with more applicants than we are even able to serve (under 
Mika Hornyak); yet another successful concert season, managed by 
Gayle Rich, notably for its production of H.M.S.- Pinafore; and a 
relentless support program of publications under Steve Sakowich which 
churned out one fine flyer or boistrous brochure after another. The 
negative side of our positive event attendance was the corollary 10% 
drop in membership and attendance. Our followers visited us in surges 
in 1981. 

The brighter side was the addition of two new staff members, 
Joan Sinatra and David Joselit, to improve the management and content 

131 



Of ill dimensions of public programs. The success of their efforts 

has been evident ail year. 

Perhaps the most important aspect of 1981 was our ability as a 
total staff to chart B proj4r.1mm.ttic course for the next five years. 
Exhibitions and events ire- already conceptualized through 1986. As 
in any organisation, no headway can be made without solid support 
Staff on one hand, and the wisdom and guidance of the Board of Trustees 
on the other. Serving both Board and staff needs, Joan Kennedy and 
Martha PeFrancesco have proven to be the sturdy core of operations 
which has helped the Museum to remain afloat during the past years. 

Exhibitions in 1981 were: "The DeCordova/Three Decades;" "Modern 
American Masterworks from the Wm. Lane Foundation" and "Three 
Installations/Catherine Jansen, Mario Kon, Michael Timpson;" "May 
We Celebrate Kids"; "The Fine Art of Business" at the Federal Reserve 
Bank of Boston; "Glass Routes;" "New England Relief/Patron's Choice II,' 
and "Being and Nothingness." 



132 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

BUSINESS COUNCIL, December 31, 1981 

Robert Allen, Chairman 
John Cant 1 in 
Jack Carter 
Peter Chapski 
Ewan Fletcher 
Kenneth Cermeshausen 
Elliott Grabill 
Ted Johnson 
Gregory Kolligian 
Ronald Massa 
Howard McMahon 
Robert Meghreblian 
Louis Rusitzky 
Paul Schratter 
Stephen Stone 
Alma Triner 
Marilyn Woodworth 

MUSEUM STAFF, December 31, 1981 

David H. Katzive, Director 

Joan Kennedy, Assistant to the Director 

Eleanor Lazarus, Assistant Director for Education 

Linda Foster, School Manager 

Bee Warren, Assistant Manager 

Betty Wolsky, Education Specialist 

Mary Woodies, Secretary 

Lynn Pearson, Store Manager 

John Anderberg, School Custodian 

Sherry Lang, Associate Curator 

Laurie Lingham, Registrar/Curatorial Assistant 

Angela Gillen, Membership Manager 

Toni Cantlin, Secretary 

Toby Marck, Receptionist 

Mika Hornyak, Corporate Program Manager 

Susan Fulmer, Assistant Manager 

Susan Jaeger, Public Relations Manager 

David Joselit, Research Specialist 

Gayle Rich, Performing Arts Coordinator 

Joan Sinatra, Program Coordinator 

Barbara Stecher, Program Specialist 

Stephen Sakowich, Designer 

Charles Mayer, Photographer 

Stephen Essman, Printer 

Joseph Mercurio, Mail Clerk 

Robinson Whitaker, Grounds Manager 



133 



Wayne Barker, Technician 
Martha DeFrancesco, Bookkeeper 
Franklin Balduf, Buildings Manager 
.James Kougeas, Assistant Manager 
Robert Estes, Technician 
Christopher McCabe, Guard 
Martha Maier, Guard 



MUSEUM ASSOCIATE COUNCIL, December 31, 1981 



Chairman 

Vice-Chairman 

Secretary 

Volunteer Committee Co-Chairman 

Town Membership Committee Chairman 
Fund-Raising Committe Chairman 
Hospitality Committee Chairman 
Nominating Committee Chairman 
Publicity and Public Relations 
Committee Chairman 
Past Chairman Ex-Officio Officer 
Business Council Ex-Officio 

Officer 
Docent Ex-Officio Officer 



Mrs. David Fernald, Acton 

Mrs. Stephen, Greyser, Wayland 

Mrs. Herbert Sherman, Lexington 

Mrs. Richard hersum, Weston 

Mrs. Joseph dePeyster, Needham 

Mrs. Michael Weiss, Sudbury 

Mrs. Robert Collings, Stow 

Mrs. Robert Verier, Lexington 

Mrs. Floyd Frost, Stow 

Mrs. William Smith, Sudbury 

Mrs. Ronald Massa, Bedford 

Mrs. Robert Allen, Weston 

Mrs. Deborah Hansen, Lincoln 



Town Membership Chairmen: 

Lincoln 
Acton 
Wayland 
Sudbury 

Council Committee Members: 

Acton 

Acton 

Bedford 

Concord 

Concord 

Chelmsford 

Lexington 

Lincoln 

Stow 

Sudbury 

Wayland 

Weston 

Weston 

Lincoln 

Lexington 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Bedford 

Carlisle 

Lincoln 



Mrs. Julie Pugh 

Mrs. Dorothy Beanland 

Mrs. Keena Clifford 

Mrs. Nancy Adolph 



Mrs. Betty Lou Long 
Mrs. Judi Giroux 
Mrs. Judith Brown 
Mr. David Chase 
Mrs. Paula Christman 
Mrs. Ethyl ReSavage 
Mrs. Joyce Feamside 
Mrs. Anne Young 
Mrs. Laura Orsatti 
Mrs. Benje Freedman 
Mrs. Helga Volkema 
Mrs. Betty Cullaty 
Mrs. Phyllis Lapidas 
Mrs. Barbara Sisson 
Mrs. Peggy Moreau 
Mrs. Susan Ludden 
Mrs. Barbara Garrison 
Mrs. Sandy Maczko 
Mrs. Frances Dovydaitis 
Mrs. Marion Donnell 



134 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

BALANCE SHEET, December 31,1980 

1980 

Unrestricted Restricted Combined 

Operating Operating Total 

ASSETS Fund Fund (NoteG) 

Current Assets: 
Cash 

Accounts receivable 
Gifts and grants receivable 
Advances to restricted operating 

fund 
Inventory, at lower of cost or 

market 
Prepaid expenses 

Total current assets 

Fixed assets purchased subsequent 

to 1/1/78, net (Notes B and E) 
Works of art purchased subsequent 

to 1/1/76 (Note B) 

Total assets $ 286,303 $ 5,323 $291,626 



$ 18,017 


$ 5,016 


$ 23,033 


363 




363 


186 


15,750 


15,936 


15,443 


(15,443) 


- 


18,300 




18,300 


686 




686 


52,995 


5,323 


58,318 


97,964 




97,964 


135,344 




135,344 



LIABILITIES 

Current liabilities: 

Notes payable, current portion 



(Note E) 
Accounts payable and accrued 

expenses 
Advance payments for Museum 

school tuition 


71,300 
49,905 
22,048 


Total current liabilities 


143,253 


Notes payable (Note E) 
FUND BALANCES 


40,900 



Unrestricted operating fund 

balance 
Restricted operating fund 

balance 

Total fund balance 

Total liabilities and 
fund balances 



307 



5,323 



71 : 


,300. 


50 : 


,212 


22 


,048 


148 : 


,576 



40,900 



102,150 






102,150 






5,016 
5,016 


5,016 


102,150 


107,166 


$286,303 


$ 


5,323 


$291,626 



135 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
STATEMENT OF-' SUPPORT, REVENUE, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

tor tin- yrar ended December 31,1980 

1980 



Unrestricted 

Operat ing 

Fund 



Restr 
Operat ing 
fund 



Combined 
Total 
• " Gl 



Support and revenue: 
Support : 

Gifts to annual appeal 
Contributions 
Grants and gifts for 

special purposes(NoteF) 

Total support 



$ 41,498 
6,652 

20,481 

68,631 



55,136 



55,136 



$ 41,498 
6,652 

75,617 

123,767 



Revenue: 

Individual membership 

Corporate membership 

Admissions 

Museum school and store 

Summer concerts 

Benefits and other programs 

Income from trust funds 

(Note C) 
Miscellaneous 



98,214 




98,214 


75,125 




75,125 


26,206 




26,206 


305,214 


63,960 


369,174 


18,592 


16,650 


35,242 


41,514 




41,514 


181,190 




181,190 


14,604 




14,604 



Total revenue 



760,659 



Total support and revenue 829, 290 



80,610 



135,746 



841,219 
965,036 



136 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

STATEMENT OF SUPPORT, REVENUE, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

Continued 



Unrestricted Restricted Combined 
Operating Operating Total 
Fund Fund (NoteG) 



Expenses: 

Program services: 

Events $ 23,973 

Exhibitions 57,494 

Museum School § store 278,078 

Summer concerts 15,811 

Benefits 

Publications 70,119 

Total program services 445,475 

Supporting services: 

Administration $ general ("including 

interest of $17,568 & 

$18, 349, respectively) 172,847 
Building and grounds 89,302 
Depreciation of fixed assets 13,511 
Membership and development 70,555 

Total supporting services 

Total program § support expenses 

Excess of support 5 revenue over 

expenses from current operations 37,600 

Transfer to Unrestricted Operating 

fund for purchase of works of art 25,629 
Purchase of fixed assets(net) (NoteB) (4,418) 
Purchase of works of art (44,228) 
Grants $ gifts received, not expended 



Net increase (decrease) in fund balances 
for the year before capitalization 



of works of art § fixed assets 
Add purchases of works of art 

recorded as assets (Note B) 
Add purchases of fixed assets 

(Note B) 

Change in fund balance for year 
Fund balance, beginning of year 

Fund balance, end of year 



14,583 



44,228 



4,41; 



63,229 
38,921 



$102,150 



$ 23,973 

$ 23,850 81,344 

63,959 342,037 

16,650 32,461 

70,119 



104,459 



2,887 



6,000 



22,400 



(25,629) 



5,016 



1,787 
3,229 



549,934 



175,734 
89,302 
13,511 

76,555 



346,215 


8,887 


355,102 


791,690 


113,346 


905,036 



60,000 



(4,418) 

(44,228) 

5,016 



1,787 16,370 
44,228 



5,016 



4, 


,418 


65; 

42, 


,016 
,150 


$107; 


,166 





137 



BEMIS LECTURE TRUSTEES 

Saville R. Davis 
Nancy B. Ellis 
Amalie M. Kass 

The Bemis Committee 

Nancy Coons Jeanne Healey 

Deborah French Lucia MacMahon 

Ann Gannett Barbara O'Brien 

Lee Harrison Margaret Touborg 

In 1981 the Bemis Lecture Series presented two programs to the 
town. Each was very well attended. In February, Dr. Helen Caldicott 
and Professor George Gyftopoulos, a Lincoln resident, discussed 
"Energy Issues of the Eighties", with Ann Gannett as moderator. In 
May, Professor Lester Thurow, also a Lincoln resident, talked about 
"Reaganomics; Will it Succeed?" Lively audience participation 
followed both of these programs. 

Thomas B. Adams chose not to stand for reelection in March. His 
many years as a Trustee of the Bemis Lecture Series are fully appre- 
ciated by all who served with him and by the entire town which bene- 
fited from his success in bringing excellent speakers to Lincoln. 
His concern for high standards in the Bemis Series resulted in many 
outstanding and memorable evenings for which we shall long be grate- 
ful. Saville Davis who became the new Trustee continues that tradi- 
tion of excellence. 

The Bemis Committee provided invaluable aid to the Trustees, 
suggesting speakers and encouraging attendance at the lectures. 
They too are thoroughly appreciated by all. 



133 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Sarah G. Bobbitt 
John B. Garrison 
Eleanor T. King 
Kenneth Laurence 
Mary J. Silverstein 
Conrad H. Todd 

The Recreation Committee encourages and supports recreational 
programs for town citizens of all ages. It welcomes suggestions 
from the town at large and consults with interested groups regarding 
the feasibility of proposed programs and purchases. The Committee 
members serve as liaison with subcommittees responsible for current 
recreation-related activities. 

The main focus and efforts of the Recreation Committee this year 
were directed towards codifying rules, regulations, and responsibil- 
ities for use and maintenance of town fields. After meeting with 
the police and selectmen, the Committee established a priority list 
for field use and an accompanying fee schedule for non-resident use. 
The monies collected from field user fees will be applied to offset 
cost of field maintenance, including trash removal. Other increases 
were seen as needed for tennis court use, where lighting and mainten- 
ance are increasingly costly; players will be required to show tennis 
stickers sold by the Tennis Committee in order to use town courts. 

The Day Camp Committee continued to run a successful four week 
program for 217 Lincoln children ages preschool to eighth grade. 
Of the total staff, 26 Lincoln young people held 68% of camp positions , 
The increase of parent fees to 80% of the total per child cost did 
not affect enrollment, since the July tuition, even at the new rate, 
was considerable less than for other comparable programs. The Codman 
Pool subsidy continues to be a problem, but progress has been made 
in resolving this annual deficit. The Recreation Committee has 
guaranteed to underwrite cost of Day Camp swimming instruction 
(currently $3,000) with monies taken from Day Camp and/or Recreation 
Committee funds, a major item in the yearly budget. 

Ongoing support for town soccer at all levels and Little League 
(equipment), Fourth of July and Thanksgiving square dances (callers/ 
custodians), and various special activities was expressed by members' 
participation and financial commitment. The Committee usually meets 
the first Tuesday of each month and invites interested residents to 
attend. 



139 



LINCOLN YOUTH COMMI 
Sarah Bobbitl 

Way in- Mount 

Jane Tat Lock 

Julia S. Pugh , Vout h i) i re 

The Lincoln Youth Committee's nand to promote, coordinate 
and evaluate activities for Lincoln's youth and be responsive to their 
needs" during the school year. The Committee consists of thl 
members (appointed by the Recreation Committee, the School Committee, 
and th men) who hire the Director and meet with her/him on the 
first Thursday of each month at 8 a.m. at Center School. Agendas 
and minutes of all meetings, which are open to the public, are prepared 
by the Director and placed on file at Town Hall. 

In the shadow of Proposition 2\, the Youth Committee was success- 
ful in cutting its already small budget to the bone and in increasing 
user fees (fees for after school activities, admissions to movies 
and dances) to defray budget costs. Other achievements included: 
support for the projected after school day care program (begun in 
1981), completion of an official job description for the position 
of Youth Director, publication and dissemination of a "behavior code" 
which students must sign before attending Youth Committee dances/ 
social events, and an initial investigation into the areas of Reserve 
Fund Transfers and Agency Accounts. 

Most of the activities this year focused again on children in 
grades 2-8. Monthly dances at the Upper Town Hall, roller skating 
parties, Saturday morning movies, ski trips, and end of school class 
parties were Special Events; ongoing activities included the usual 
broad range of age appropriate after school sports. A problem that 
surfaced during the year was that of increasing disciplinary lapses 
at social events, during team games, and in specific sports programs. 
There was some effort to meet with school staff for a joint discussion 
of goals and expectations; this subject will be explored further. 
Finally, the Job Bank continues to be updated periodically and helps 
to match supply and demand for youth employment. 

The Lincoln Youth Committee has the additional responsibility 
of acting as facilitator in the community, welcoming and supporting 
ideas for new youth-related programs which would otherwise not be 
available to school age children. One such program which the Youth 
Director is investigating is alcohol and drug education for parents 
and students. With increased transportation costs and an increasing 
need for Lincoln youngsters to gain proficiency in sports, enabling 
them to participate competitively on high school teams, the Youth 
Committee stands ready to respond to new demands as they arise. The 
Committee and the Youth Director are grateful to the many parent and 
volunteers, as well as paid professionals, who have contributed to the 
success of past programs and invite continued input for new ones from 
all interested townspeople. 



CODMAN POOL COMMITTEE 

Richard Carroll 

Pamela Hansen 

Diane Nockles 

William Reed 

Jacqueline Snelling 

Kay Yeuell 

Harry Hadley, Chairman - resigned 

Susan Harding, Chairman 

In Lincoln, Codman Pool is one of the few places in summer that 
people come to, instead of leaving. This was truer than ever last 
summer. Sandy Anderson returned as Pool Director as well as Swim 
Team Coach, and headed a staff of nine guards and instructors, 
seven of whom were from Lincoln. In addition to operating the 
swimming program for the Lincoln Summer Day Camp, the pool offered 
free instruction in toddler classes through Senior Life-Saving. 
The lack of response to a Senior Citizen Swim period was one of 
our few disappointemnts . The Swim Team attracted almost a hundred 
children from the ages of five through seventeen, and hosted 
the Minuteman League Championships in August. 

One event of sad significance was the resignation of Harry 
Hadley from the Pool Committee. As a prime mover and overseer 
of the pool's operation for over eight years, Harry has given an 
enormous amount of his time and talents toward making Codman Pool 
a safe, fun and educational form of recreation for the town. We 
all owe him much gratitude for his efforts on behalf of Lincoln. 

In spite of our aptitude for water the Pool Committee finds 
itself in the same boat as many other organizations in town; we are 
wrestling with budgetary problems. For five years the committee 
had a self-imposed fee philosophy best described as Proposition 
Zero. Minor increases over the past three years have not been 
enough to offset the rising costs to operate the pool. The single 
largest expenditure has always been for the staff, and payroll 
expenses, reflecting the significant jumps in the minimum wage, 
have increased substantially in recent years. Chemicals and other 
maintenance costs have equalled or bettered the pace. With a 
limited number of members available to draw upon, the trick has 
been to estimate the number of members, then set fees at a level 
to cover anticipated expenses while still providing the best 
possible services for the smallest charge possible. Because the 
Codman Pool is set up to be self-sustaining, with membership dues 
and daily swim tickets covering all costs except for the interest 
on the building bonds paid by the Codman Trust, a wrong "guestimate" 
can end up as either a profit or loss to the pool. Unhappily 
the latter position has resulted over the past two years. 



141 



The best bright idea to increase revenue while still keeping 
fees as low as possible was the product of Harry Hadley, the insti- 
gator of so many of the good ideas associated with Codman Pool. 
Last year he came up with the idea of paired memberships. If a 
former member recruited a new member, both could enjoy a discount 
while adding to the overall revenues. This resulted in record 
highs for both revenue and membership. Unfortunately, even that 
was not enough to recoup our losses. In the coming year the Pool 
Committee plans to make further use of the paired memberhip concept 
while making an even stronger effort to hold down expenses. 

Although the Pool Committee feels that it offers one of the 
best bargains around, it knows that the Town of Lincoln has come 
to expect superlative service for the least amount of money possible. 
Perhaps the fact that we have so little "fat" explains our difficult- 
ies in keeping afloat. 

Suggestions and comments about any aspect of the pool's program 
are always welcome. 



142 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Roger Barzun 

Paula Bennett 

Eleanor Gallitano 

James Spindler 

Elizabeth Corcoran, Chairman 

1981 brought several changes in personnel serving the Lincoln 
Public Schools. Having served the Town with great energy and wis- 
dom for two terms, Priscilla Damon chose not to seek re-election to 
the School Committee this year. Paula Bennett was elected to fill 
her seat. Patricia Correia, our outstanding Business Manager, re- 
signed in the Spring and was replaced by Juliana Marchessault who 
came to us from Burlington, Vermont where she served as Treasurer 
to Trinity College. 

The staff of the school financial office, Hedy Massoth and 
Louise Jeffrey, moved to the Center School and became part of^ the 
staff of the Town of Lincoln, thus giving the Town a unified fi- 
nance office. 

Throughout 1981, the School Committee has worked to provide 
excellence in the Lincoln Public Schools through sound budgetary 
practices, careful consideration of new policies and procedures, 
and curriculum review. These three areas served as the focal points 
for School Committee activity during 1981. 

BUDGET 

The predicted drastic cuts resulting from the implementation 
of Proposition 2\ did not materialize. Although some reductions in 
the FY' 82 budget were made in plant operations and maintenance, in- 
structional supplies and materials, computer curriculum and summer 
curriculum development, no staff reductions had to be taken for this 
year. Budget guidelines for FY'83 were set by the School Committee 
in July and a budget was drawn up to meet these guidelines. The 
Finance Committee imposed a 3% limit on budget increases and the 
School Committee has agreed to meet that target. Our present pro- 
gram carried forward gave us an increase of 3.2% without the ad- 
dition of new programs or staff requests. Trade-offs will be made 
to bring to Town Meeting a budget reflecting support for the most 
important existing programs as well as continuing development of 
new program areas necessary to a vital education. The budget pro- 
cess has been complicated by the lack of a teachers' contract and 
the difficulty in determining the cost of collective bargaining in 
a budget that is 72% salar 






POLICY 

A new policy and procedure manual for the operation of the Lin- 
coln Public Schools was developed and reviewed by the Committee 
throughout the year. The resulting Policy Book, including local, 
state and federal regulations, now forms the official reference 
governing the schools. Specific areas discussed included: 

Space . Space issues continued as a focus for the School Com- 
mittee. Although our school population decreases slightly each 
year and we are graduating more eighth grade students than we have 
entering kindergarteners, no space in Hartwell or Brooks buildings 
has been freed up as yet. The Library Wing at Smith School, no 
longer used for the regular school program, has been in use this 
year to meet several child-related needs. CASE (Concord Area Spe- 
cial Education), a collaborative, has occupied three rooms for pre- 
school classes for multiple-handicap children. LEAP (Lincoln Ex- 
tended Activities Program) has rented one room for a parent- 
sponsored after-school program. A pilot afternoon program for 
METCO kindergarten children was initiated in the Spring of 1981 and 
was so successful that a full -year program was voted for the 81-82 
school year. Funds for this program come from the METCO budget. 

The business of allocating space prompted the School 
Committee to establish priorities to assist in making decisions 
about the use of the Library Wing. Until such time as it is needed 
for increases in the school population, the Committee will permit 
use of the Library Wing by non-profit organizations whose program 
is compatible with the Lincoln K-8 educational program. Priority 
will be given to: 

1. School-related programs such as CASE or METCO 
Afternoon programs; 

2. Town-sponsored activities such as the activi- 
ties of the Recreation Committee and/or the Youth Committee; 

3. Parent-sponsored programs such as the LSA Ex- 
change or After-School Child Care; 

4. Other non-profit programs. 

Guidelines for the use of school facilities were also adopted by the 
Committee. 

Transportation . A Transportation Committee reviewed bus con- 
tract s~TnT - routes~Tn the hope that transportation costs might be re- 
duced in spite of escalating gasoline costs. On the recommendation 
of this parent group, the School Committee voted to reduce the num- 
ber of routes from six to five, eliminate the late bus, and continue 
to offer transportation to all children in the public schools even 
though there is no legal requirement to bus those who live within 
two miles of the school. Although the Transportation Committee em- 
phasized safety and re-wrote the rules governing bus conduct, 

144 



safety continues to concern both parents and the School Committee. 

Time-on-Task and Full-Time Equivalencies . Recommendations re- 
garding Time-on-Task and Full-Time Equivalencies were brought to the 
Committee by Superintendent Jacqueline Clement. Time-on-Task offers 
guidelines to Hartwell and Hanscom Primary Schools in determining 
how time within the classroom is spent and defines how much time 
will be assigned to specific curriculum areas each week of the 
school year. Adoption of these recommendations gives direction to 
the administration to insure that School Committee's expectations 
about curriculum are met, while allowing flexibility in order to 
support our valued teacher-developed activities. Full-Time Equi- 
valency centers on utilization of teacher time at Brooks and Hans- 
com Middle Schools. To determine a full-time equivalency, it was 
necessary to look at how much time is spent in teaching regularly- 
scheduled, full-sized class sections, how much time is spent in 
small group work and how much time on administrative tasks and 
extra-curricular activities. Following FTE guidelines will allow 
both the Administration and the School Committee to make more ef- 
ficient use of teacher time and more precise allocations of school 
budget funds. 

CURRICULUM 

A staff Committee on Curriculum was formed to provide an over- 
view of curriculum development and insure through a planning pro- 
cess that each area would be addressed in turn, as well as reviewed 
and updated when necessary. This allows for a logical and focused 
evolution of school programs and enables staff to concentrate on 
specific curriculum. The areas receiving special attention this 
year were Science, Music, Health, Writing and Computer. The K-8 
Science curriculum is now complete; grades K-5 were implemented 
this year. A music curriculum, K-7, has been presented to the 
School Committee. The schools haye begun developing a computer cur- 
riculum with emphasis this year on K-5 activities as well as a 5th 
grade computer literacy program. Next year, we hope to implement 
a computer curriculum program at Brooks. Grades 4-8 have been fo- 
cusing on student writing. A faculty Health Curriculum Committee 
has begun the implementation of a Health program of studies in 
Grade 1 using materials developed by a national health education 

group. 

* * * 

The continuing challenge for the Lincoln Public Schools re- 
mains how best to meet the needs of all students in a time of ever- 

sing fiscal restraints. A superb, dedicated staff, caring, 
thoughtful parents and a supportive communit> should insure that 
the School Committee can continue to meet that challenge as it has 
in the past. 



143 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



J.uqueline P. Clement 
Sarah Willi BBS 
Juliana Marchessault 
Robert Budcis 
Maurice Wright 
William Warren 
Marvin Shapiro 
Sally Webber 
Ronald Hadge 



Superintendent of Schools 
Director of Pupil Services 
Business Manager 
Director of Plant Operations 
METCO Coordinator 
Principal, Hartwell School 
Principal, Brooks School 
Principal, Hanscom Primary School 
Principal, Hanscom Middle School 



Hours: 



The Office of the Superintendent is open Monday through Friday 
from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



"NO SCHOOL" SIGNALS 

Local signals will be given on our fire alarm at 6:30 and 7:00 a.m. 

Radio announcements will be read between the period of 6:30 a.m. and 
7:30 a.m. Please refrain from tying up local phone lines to school 
officials, fire station and bus operators. 



WBZ 



1030 KC. . . WHDH 



850 KC 



WK0X 



1190 KC 



Announcements regarding "No School" are made by the Lincoln Superin- 
tendent of Schools for the Lincoln Elementary Schools (Grades K-8) 
only. Announcements for the Regional High School are made by the 
Regional Superintendent of Schools and will be designated "Lincoln ■ 
Sudbury Regional High School". 



146 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



ENROLLMENT AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1981 













Total per 


1980 


School 


Grade 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


School 


Comparison 


Hartwell 


K 


21 


26 


47 




-3 




1 


26 


31 


57 




+11 




2 


25 


24 


49 




-11 




3 


35 


33 


68 




+25 




4 


21 


22 


43 




-44 




5 


45 


38 


83 




same 



347 



-22 



Brooks 



6 


40 


47 




87 




+22 


7 


28 


39 




67 




- 6 


8 


30 


44 


Tota 


74 
1 Lincoln 


228 

575 


-17 




- 1 



Hanscom 


K 


28 


31 




59 




+ 1 


Primary 


1 


37 


28 




65 




+ 4 




2 


35 


29 




64 




- 3 




3 


31 


33 




64 


252 


- 1 
+ 1 


Hanscom 


4 


36 


31 




67 




- 8 


Middle 


















5 


40 


28 




68 




+ 3 




6 


28 


22 




50 




- 5 




7 


25 


32 




57 




+ 21 




8 


15 


24 




39 




-12 










Tota 


1 Hanscom 


281 
533 


- 1 




- 






Grand Total 


1108 





METCO students are included in the above 
total and break down as follows: 

K - 8 

1 - 7 

2 - 9 
3-14 
4-9 101 same as 1980 

Lincoln CASE and Outside Placements , Same as 1980 

Hanscom CASE and Outside Placements , Down 3 



5 


- 


13 


6 


- 


15 


7 


- 


13 


8 


- 


13 



147 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1981 



Christopher B. Allen 
Danielle Christine Atkinson 
Lucy Belinda Birkett 
Stephen M. Birmingham 
Maura Jane Brosnan 
Leslie Alson Brown 
Benjamin A. Budds 
Leslie Ann Burt 
Adrienne Lenore Bye 
Craig Maurice Carter 
Carolyn Bradley Caswell 
Suzanna Palmer Collins 
Jennifer D. Como 
Christine A. Corcoran 
Peter Andrew D'Elia 
Joyce Maire Dennis 
Sharon Angela Denton 
Nigel H. Drakes 
John Bradley Emery 
Monica Benaa Fields 
D. Paul Fitzgerald 
Jonathan I Foster 
Michelle Jean Fowler 
Christopher Winston Franklin 
Anthony Gallagher Friel 
Marius Matthew Gallitano 
Gaelen Frances Green 
Henry H. Hadley, Jr. 
Sarah D. Haessler 
Sarah Allen Hammond 
Wendy Andrea Harrington 
Susan Eileen Hart 
Scott Laird Harvey 
Laura Hall Heijn 
Sara Henry 
Mary E. Herman 
Brenda Michelle Hershbach 
A. Todd Hildebrand 
Philipia Lauren Hillman 
Benjamin Dodge Home 
Mark D. Howard 
Garrett S. Immel 
Susan Abigail Janes 
Brooks Campbell King 
Geoffrey W. Kornfeld 



Patricia Louise Lane 

Matthew James Wilson Laurence 

Martha Gale Leggat 

Erik Jason Marion 

Rodney Marshall 

Carol Jean Mecsas 

Toby H. Mintz 

Kevin Joseph Morrissey 

William F. Morse 

William A. Munroe 

Shahinaz Nabih 

Barbara Dahmen N'eily 

Paul Kenyon O'Rourke, Jr. 

Terrence Monroe Patterson 

Lyman Perry 

Karon C. Peterkin 

James Christopher Pianka 

Sarah E. Pike 

Kevin Mercer Forsyth Piatt 

Alexander LeFevre Pugh IV 

W. David Ritsher 

Jennifer Wing Russell 

Elisa Marie Sartori 

Holly A. Scott 

Patrick Joseph Sheehan 

Erik P. Shuman 

Jean Marie Simms 

Caron Wendover Smith 

David Neill Spindler 

Susannah C. Spock 

John Michael Stankard 

Rachel Elizabeth Steczynski 

Katrina Isaaca Stimmell 

Dion Hayes Stubbs 

Marcea Danielle Taylor 

Scott Terrell 

Regina Terry 

Whittemore G. Tingley 

Merideth Toler 

Steven J. Walker 

Katherine Michelle Wiley 

Carolyn Gardner Wofford 

Jennifer Alls ion Wofford 

Thomas B. Yos 

Sarah Zevin 



148 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Richard F. Brooks 

Linda Glass 

Alan H. Grathwohl 

William A. King 

Joan W. Wofford 

Dante Germanotta, Chairman 

The year of January 1, 1981, to December 31, 1981, has been one 
of unusual significance for the Regional High School. During this 
year the Committee suffered the loss of one of its more active members 
through the untimely death of Ronald Blecher. His contributions to the 
Committee's work and his strong personal presence have been greatly 
missed. 

During this same year, another important crossroads was reached 
as the Committee brought the tenure of Superintendent/Principal 
David Levington to a close and appointed Bradford Sargent as Acting 
Superintendent/Principal. These administrative changes represent a 
culmination of a long process of institutional self-evaluation 
involving hours of work by committees, task forces and individuals 
from both school and town communities. David Levington served the 
school well and it was the future rather than the past that prompted 
the Committee, by majority vote, to replace him. 

The Committee has moved since then with some dispatch to respond 
to the present needs of the school and to establish patterns for the 
future. By the time this report reaches the communities it is more 
than probable that a new Principal will have been appointed and the 
Committee will have moved further along in its planning with the Sudbury 
School Committee toward a joint Superintendency. The search for this 
person is to begin in the fall of 1982. 

Among other things which the Committee has accomplished this year 
are: The election of Linda Glass at a Special Meeting with the 
Selectmen Chairmen of the respective towns to fill the vacancy left 
by the death of Ronald Blecher; the appointment, in concert with the 
Sudbury School Committee, of Anthony Zarella as shared Director of 
Pupil Services and John Wilson as shared Director of Administrative 
Affairs; the appointment of Gayle Weiss to a half-time position in 
Human Relations; and the completion of negotiations with the Teachers' 
Association for a 3-year contract. 

It is clear to the Committee that we are about to enter a most 
critical stage of a major re-ordering of the school's program with a 
concomitant reduction of staff, given the current constraints of 
public spending. This does not mean profound changes in the educa- 
tional philosophy of the school but it will demand a new application 
of this philosophy in the fashioning of a re-ordered school for the 
next half-decade. In all of this the Committee continues to need your 
support in the maintaining of the educational quality of the school. 

149 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Bradford H. Sargent ( Acting Superintendent 

The ' chool year was once again a very successful and 
Interesting one for the school and its student body. While the staff 
began to interpret the effects of proposition 2[, the students con- 
tinued to excel in their endeavors. The future remains uncertain, 
but there is certainty in the fact that the educational program will 
be a challenge to the students. 

There have been changes during the past year in the administrative 
staff. Dave Levington, who served the school for eight years, is 
no longer at Lincoln-Sudbury. Within the near future there will be 
a permanent replacement and necessary changes will be made in the 
organizational structure of the school. These will reflect the needs 
for the next few years as the school experiences further declines 
in enrollment. 

The following information will indicate to you the success 
achieved by many of the graduates of your high school and a copy of 
the budget to give you an overview of the financial picture. 



150 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1981 



*Robin Lynne Aaronson 
Marc Alden 
Carl Anderson 
Richard Andrews 
John Armstrong 
Elisabeth Atkinson 

Melissa Babigian 

Kim Bahlkow 

Carol Bailey 

Jessica Baldi 

Stephen Bankuti 

Linda Barilone 

Cheryl Ann Barlow 

Leslie Barnard 

Christine Bassett 

Jeanne Williams Bassett 

Lisa Marie Beck 
*Katherine Bell 

Dean Bennett 
*Heidi Berube 

Barbara Jeanne Bitter 

Mary Elizabeth Blanchard 

Peter Koch Blaser 

Mark Blecher 

Michael Bond 

Terence Boots 

Phyllis Boseman 

Monique Boucher 

Robin Bos shard 

Karen Bowers 

Lisa Brasington 

Lynn Briden 

Jacqueline Denise Brock 

Karin Brond 

Billy Brooks, Jr. 

Wendy Brown 

Guy Alexander Bryant 

Brett Burgess 

James Burke 

Romeo M. Bustamante 

Cynthia Cabral 
Douglas B. Cameron 
Dawn Michelle Carroll 
*Mary Carroll 
Leona Champeny 
Thomas Charnley 
Douglas Chase 
Theresa Cialdea 
Cono Cimino 
Martin Clark 
Andrew Benjamin Cohen 
Paul Connors 
R. Gregory Cooke 



Ann M. Cosgrove 
*Karyn Cosgrove 
William J. Cossart, III 
Donna Court emanche 
Louise M. Cuozzi 

Richard Daeschner 

Mark Dale 

Steven Daley 

Sheila Maria Daly 

Steven Dandeneau 

John Dardani 

Lawrence David 

Marsha Davison 

Jonathan Wayne Davis 

Kenneth Davis 
*Michael Davis 

Pamela Elizabeth Davis 
*Suzanne Westwood Davison 

Debra DeJesus 

Eileen Delahunty 

Sarah Delay 

Eric M. Dempsey 

Peter Denisevich 

Cregg Dennis 
*Amy Devlin 

Richard DeWolf 

Paul Dickson 

Richard DiPalma 

Martha Mary Distler 

Mary Alice Distler 
*Hung Manh Do 

Nanette DeAnne Doiron 

Christina Domico 

Keith Donnellan 

Kerrie Dowdy 

Nancy Doyle 

David Durning 

Douglas Evans 

Andrew Faddoul 
Julie Farrar 
Leslie Farrar 
John Fausch 
Cindy Faye 
James Fernald 
Nicholas Finamore 
Christine Finerty 
Paul Ford 
Debra Foster 
Dawn Fowler 
Dawn Francis 
*Hillary Jane Frank 
Catherine Frazer 
Terrance Frazier 



151 



' kr 1 ^t en Pred r U kson 

lavlor P it-cm. m 
Ke 1 1 cv Ann IicikIi 
Marce 1 1 ,i Ins i 1 lo 

• i 1 1 1 6al Lagher 
Joseph c.i l Lagher 
Michael Ga l l agher 

Stephen C.i I lowny 

Carlo Hunter Sarbarino 

Stephen E. Garrity 
Kevin Gates 
Pan 1 ine Gazza 
John Gessner 
Carol Gibson 
Christopher Gillis 
Juanita Giner 
Michael Giobbe 
Joseph Gottberg 
*Barbara Grathwohl 
Roberta Greaves 
Laurie Michelle Greenberg 
Ellen Greene 
Andrew Gregson 
Mark Gross 
I. Scott Grossman 
Martin Guentert 
Laurence Guild 
Robert Gursky 

Roger Had ley 

Eric Haessler 

Jennifer Hall 

Julie Hall 

Mary Halter 

Mark Hanlon 

Kara Harding 
*Tracy Ann Hardy 

Angela Harnisch 

Scott Hasche 

Lauren Hawes 

Gretel K. Hayes 

Shannon Healy 
*Peter Moses Hecht 

Ethan Heijn 

Suzanne Heiser 

Elizabeth A. Hewitt 

Mary Elizabeth Henebry 

Stephanie Hicks 

Robert Hill 

Thomas Hillery 

Gregory Hoff 

Steven Holmgren 

Ravishanker Hoskere 

Jeffrey Hotch 

Lynne Howes 

Allison Hughes 

Maria Hunt 



Andreas .J. P. 
I la i ■■ Jackson 

David Stuart .Johnson 
Nicholas Join 

Robert Johnson 

Paul .Joseph 

Lisa Robin Karl off 
Susan Ruth Kaufman 
Shelley Elizabeth Keith 
Claudia Anne Kellberg 
•Lisa Ann Kel I stedt 
I. i 1 een Kel ly 
.Jeffrey Kelso 
Kimberley Kendrick 
Laura Kleine 
Nita Beth Klobuchar 
Melvin Kornegay 
Jonathan Lee Kramer 
Christa Jean Kreyling 
David Brian Kutz 
Carolyn Kyriakos 

Patricia Lally 

Solvieig Landsverk 

Timothy M. Lanza 

Jean-Pierre Laurendeau 

Cathy Lawson 

Douglas Kendrick Lennan 

Theresa Lettery 

Claire Helen Levey 

Cynthia Lewis 

Linda Lewis 

Jeffrey Low 

Stephanie Lubash 

Karen Lucchese 

Joseph Lucero 

Christine MacDonald 
*Donna Marie DeCosta MacDonald 

Stuart Charles MacDonald, Jr. 

Laura Mackie 

Gregory Mager 

Christopher Magnuson 

Gregory Malerbi 

Douglas Malone 

Maria Mangini 

Judy Manuel 
*Carl Marquis, III 

Jeffrey Marsh 

John Marsh 

Glen Martinec 

Lynne Mattair 

Nancy Maurer 

Kimberly Maurhoff 

Alice McCall 

Daniel McCarthy 

Elizabeth McCarthy 

Lynne McCusker 



152 



Margaret McGee 
Michael McGee 
Donald McHugh 
Keith McKnight 
Cara McNamara 
Patrick McNamara 
David R. Meader 
Linda Mercurio 
*Susan Mary Merra 
Sharon Merrill 
Raymond Middleton 
Frederick Miekka 
Michael Mikoski 
Kathleen Mills 
Jody Mohlar 
Philip Moineau 
Paul Monson 
Jon Montgomery 
Kathleen Irene Moroney 
Scott Morrison 
Pamela B. Morse 
Daniel Mryglot 
Laurie Jane Mugford 
Lynda Carol Munsey 
Lisa Mussoni 

Bradley Nagel 
Jeffrey K„ Napoli 
Stephen Nathan 
Kathryn Neenan 
Elizabeth Newton 
Jacqueline Nims 
Ben Nisbet 

Christine O'Donnell 
*Martina Oechsle 
Patricia O'Leary 
Daniel Olsen 
Christine Olson 
Jean O'Malley 
Patricia O'Rourke 
Caitlin P. Owen 

Warren Parr 

Stephen Parry 

Eevelyn Mae Louise Patterson 

Sharon Pearson 

Linda Perkins 
*Arno Pettai 

Martha Phinney 

Marcia Place 

Randall Cary Patton Piatt 

Cindy Pollens 
*Suzanne Louise Poulin 

Angela Pugh 

Scott Punch 

Pamela Joy Radle 
James Rarus 
*Elizabeth Ann Read 



Patricia Regan 
Russell Regenauer 
Pamela Constance Reinen 
Darla Rendulic 
R. Scott Reutlinger 
Heidi Rhodes 
Cathleen Riley 
C. Beth Robison 
Laura Ross 
Natalie 0. Roth 
Gordon Davidson Row 

*Joel Sackman 
*Joanne Saltsman 

Mary Sargent 

Andrea Saxe 

Martin Schulz 

Peter Scott 

Laura Semple 

Roberta Sharkey 

Rachael Sheridan 

Joseph Signa 

Giselle Silva 

Kathryn Elizabeth Sklenak 
*Lisa Anne Smith 

Timothy Smith 

Donna Elizabeth Snelling 

Donna Jane Somers 

Bento Souza 

Brendan Spaeth 

Donna Stacey 

Heidi Rebekka Stahl 

Charles Stankard 

William Stearns 

Madeleine Steczynski 

Paul H. Stenberg, Jr. 
*Panos Stephens 

Lisa Stewart 

William Eric Stowe 

Sibyl Straub 

Duncan Street 

Alexander Sugar 

Kathleen Sullivan 

Karen Sullivan 

Patrick Sullivan 
*Stephanie Sutton 

Rebecca Parkhurst Sykes 

Julie Ann Szymczak 

*Ellen Taschioglou 

Steven Taskovics 

Janet Taylor 

Sharon Tepper 

Suzanne Thibault 

Daniel Titus 

Abel Tong 

Richard Towle 
*Jennifcr Tratnyek 

Robert Trocchi 



153 



John Turner 

rd VunlHiyne 
Peter G. Van Tol 
Ellen Velie 
William D. Venter 
Christopher Vorderer 

*Kr i st ina Wadman 

Gregory Walker 

Anne Wallace 

Christopher Wallingford 
Mames Cullen Walsh 

Douglas Warren 

Albert Weggeman 

Richard Weissman 

Jon Carlton Wesslen 

Craig R. What ley 

Cheryl A. Whitcomb 

Timothy Whitcomb 

Diane White 

Timothy White 

Terri Wilkinson 

Amy Elizabeth Wollensak 

Cherell Woloski 

Farrell Woods, Jr. 

Goske Yonetani 

Gail Zalomis 
Lynn Zuelke 



r CUM LAUDE 



154 



DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS ATTENDING REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1981 



1977 



1978 



1979 



1980 



1981 



Lincoln 


290 


261 


223 


196 


197 


Sudbury 


1,343 


1,309 


1,221 


1,179 


1,129 


METCO (Tuition) 


85 


84 


85 


92 


97 


Other 


11 
1,729 


14 
1,668 


13 
1,542 


9 
1,476 


8 


Total 


1,431 


Boys 


824 


787 


717 


705 


699 


Girls 


905 


881 


825 


771 


732 


Total 


1,729 


1,668 


1,542 


1,476 


1,431 


9th Grade 


411 


417 


358 


325 


333 


10th Grade 


400 


395 


404 


367 


332 


11th Grade 


442 


390 


382 


405 


368 


12th Grade 


467 


455 


391 


379 


398 


Other 


9 


11 


7 


- 


- 



Total 1,729 1,668 1,542 1,476 1,431 

Tuition Pupils 

Attending Other Schools 27 26 30 34 32 



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."• 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
TREASURER'S REPORT 
July 1, 1980 thru June 30, 1981 
Marcia A. Roehr, Treasurer 
Total Cash Balance, July 1, 1980 



$ 85,928.40 



District Fund 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1980 
Receipts : 

Operating Accounts 



$ (28,057.11 ) 



Lincoln Assessment 






591,609.46 








Sudbury Assessment 






3,543,256.70 








Total 








4, 


,134,866. 


,16 


Construction Aid 






285,798.00 








Transportation 






132,068.00 








Chapter 70 






707,774.00 








Chapter 71-16D 






300,817.00 








Total 








1 


,426,457. 


,00 


Met co 






90,000.00 








Total 










90,000, 


,00 


Investments 






10,875,000.00 








Miscellaneous Income 






162,120.78 








Petty Cash Refund 






750.00 








Tailings 






375.01 








Total 








11 


,038,245. 


,79 


Total Operating 


I Receipts 




$16 : 


,689,568, 


95 


Deduction Accounts 














Federal Withholding ' 


rax 




650,349.64 








Massachusetts Withho: 


Lding 


Tax 


178,911.17 








Blue Cross, Blue Shield 




45,054.13 








County Retirement 






36,253.39 








Teachers Retirement 






158,764.09 








Disability Insurance 


#1 




22,997.55 








Disability Insurance 


#2 




585.84 








Tax Sheltered Annuities 




134,139.56 








Teachers Association 






20,332.00 








Credit Union 






247,382.00 








United Way 






1,011.00 








Heys Memorial Fund 






483.50 








Total Deduction 1 


^eceip 


ts 




1, 


,496,263, 


.87 


Total District Fund Re 


ceipts 




$18 


,185,852 


,82 


Total District 


Fund 






$18 ; 


,157,775, 


.71 



157 



DISTRICT FUND (continued) 
Disbursements : 

Operating Accounts 

Operating Budget 5,314,826.01 

Community Service 493.52 

Equipment 101,878.23 

Debt Service-principal 360,000.00 

interest 49,162.50 

State House Note #15-interest 531.50 

Total 5,826,891.76 

Investments 10,825,000.00 

Petty Cash Advance 750.00 

Tailings 595.46 

Total $16,653,237.22 

Total Operating Disbursements 

Deduction Accounts 

Federal Withholding Tax 650,549.64 

Massachusetts Withholding Tax 178,911.17 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 45,309.14 

Teachers Retirement 158,764.09 

County Retirement 36,253.39 

Disability Insurance #1 22,690.20 

Disability Insurance #2 585.84 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 130,559.56 

Teachers Association 20,332.00 

Credit Union 247,382.00 

United Way 1,011.00 

Heys Memorial Fund 483. 50 

Total Deduction Disbursements 1 , 492, 631,53 

Total District Fund Disbursements 
Cash Balance, District Fund, June 30, 1981 

Cash Balance 

Scholarship Fund $ 95,815.80 
Cash Balance 

Other revolving accounts 55,210. 79 

Total : Revolving accounts S 151,026.59 

Total Cash Balance June 30, 1981 $ 162,933.55 



$18, 


,145 


,868, 


.75 




$ 


11. 


,906 


.96 





158 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



Balance Sheet 



June 30, 1981 



Assets 



First National Bank of Boston 
Bay Bank Middlesex 
Concord Cooperative Bank 
Bond-State of Israel 
Certificates of Deposit 
Lincoln-Roof Repair Project 
Sudbury-Roof Repair Project 
Total Assets 



64,586. 


,54 


2,218. 


,71 


95,815. 


,80 


312, 


,50 


325,000, 


,00 


2,138. 


,23 


10,293, 


,39 



$500,365.17 



Liabilities and Reserves 



Tailings 

Surplus Revenue 

Roof Repair Project 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

Disability Insurance #1 

Disability Insurance #2 

Tax Sheltered Annueities 

Met co 

P. L. 94-482 FY 81 

Title IV FY 81 

Computer Parts 

Audio Visual Replacement 

Nursery School 

Adult Education 

Cafeteria 

Athletic Fund 

Towel Fund 

Scholarship Fund 

Bond 

Total Liabilities 



308.10 

308,250.87 

12,431.62 

5,176.16 

3,385.43 

97.64 

19,688.76 



3,483.89 

1,922.27 

3,606.68 

3,151.74 

100.00 

10,124.05 

4,126.60 

26,718.26 

539.75 

1,125.05 

95,815.80 

312.50 



1500,365.17 



Outstanding Debt 

State House Note #15, payable August 1, 1981 
3.1% School Bonds, payable $100,000 February 1, 1982-85 

payable $ 25,000 August 1, 1981-83 

$ 20,000 August 1, 1984-86 

payable $220,000 August 1, 1981-82 

payable $ 15,000 August 1, 1981-84 



4.0% School Bonds 



4.5 
6.5 



School Bonds 
School Bonds 



Total Outstanding Debt 



15,000.00 
400,000.00 

75,000.00 

60,000.00 
440,000.00 

60,000.00 
$1,050,000.00 



159 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Budget FY 81-82 
July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1982 



Pupils 



1575 



1476 



1408 





Expended 


Budget 


Budget 


%Increase 


Account 


FY 79-80 


FY 80-81 


FY 81-82 


Decrease 


1000 Administration 










1100 School Committee 


$ 13,823 


$ 9,750 


$ 17,575 




1200 Superintendent 


143,735 


155,918 


152,301 




SUB-TOTAL 


157,558 


165,668 


169,876 


+ 2.5 


2000 Instruction 










2200 Principal 


237,320 


242,332 


262,531 




2300 Teaching 


2,518,913 


2,677,574 


2,835,121 




2400 Textbooks 


27,031 


39,619 


33,932 




2500 Library 


73,177 


79,584 


72,489 




2600 Audio Visual 


50,181 


56,207 


55,950 




2700 Student Services 


181,670 


195,708 


196,824 




2800 Psych. Services 


69,570 


70,912 


50,140 




SUB -TOTAL 


3,157,862 


3,361,936 


3,506,987 


+4.3 


3000 Other School Services 










3100/3200 Att. & Health 


32,703 


33,309 


32,056 




3300 Transportation 


259,684 


247,468 


225,940 




3500 Ath. £ Student Acct. 


124,212 


141,113 


120,280 




SUB-TOTAL 


416,599 


421,890 


378,276 


-10.3 


4000 Plant § Maintenance 










4100 Operation 


438,797 


510,661 


513,743 




4200 Maintenance 


238,416 


274,166 


280,544 




SUB-TOTAL 


677,213 


784,827 


794,287 


+ 1.2 


5000 Fixed Charges 










5100 Emp. Retirement 










& Unemployment 


65,561 


85,000 


106,000 




5200 Insurance 


183,539 


189,673 


211,838 




5300 Lease 






1 




5400 Debt Service 




15,531 
290,204 


16,013 
333,852 




SUB -TOTAL 


249,100 


+ 15.0 



9000 Programs with Other 

Districts/Schools 

9100 Programs with other 

Schools 230,752 292,000 237,500 

Contingency 71,684 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGETS 

6000 Community Service 

7000 Equipment 

8000 Debt Service 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES $5,464,654 

Estimated Reimbursement (2,078,152) (1,693,783) (1,678,057) 

Total Net Assessment 3,390,039 4,134,866 4,267,936 

Lincoln Net Assessment (570,286) (591,609) (575,649) 

Sudbury Net Assessment (2,819,753) (3,543,256) (3,692,287) 



$4 


,889 


,084 
246 


S5 


,316 


,525 
500 


$5 


,492 


,462 
500 




99 


,886 




101 


,930 




58 


,294 




475. 


,438 




409 


,694 




394 


,738 



$5,828,649 $5,945,994 



■18.7 

+ 3.3 

•42.8 
■ 3.7 
• 2.0 



160 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

James and Cristel Alden 

David and Dorothy Bagley 

Thomas and Jane Carroll 

Raymond P. Clark 

William King 

Virginia Kirshner 

Karen Knoll '83 

Irene McCarthy 

Lou and Phyllis Mutschler 

Lawrence and Esther Ovian 

Marcia Rarus 

Mitchell Rudnick 

Marcia Roehr 

Mark Ruckstuhl '82 

Paula Wolfe 

The Lincoln-Sudbury Regional Scholarship Fund, through the gen- 
erous contributions of the citizens and business organizations of 
Lincoln and Sudbury, has achieved an endowment of $103,000. This 
has been made possible through our annual Fall mail appeal, income 
from Springthing, traditionally held the second Saturday in May and 
memorial contributions. A perpetual endowment of $10,000 honoring the 
memory of former Assistant Principal, Frank Heys is nearly complete. 
A perpetual endowment as a memorial to John Wirzburger, '83 is being 
established. Fund guidelines require a perpetual endowment to be 
fully subscribed within a five year period. 

The Fund is available to any graduate of Lincoln-Sudbury with 
definite career plans and financial need. In June of 1981 thirteen 
graduates were so recognized. A total of $10,000 was awarded to these 
outstanding students. Information about the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
Scholarship Fund may be obtained by calling the school (443-9961, 
259-9527). 

1981 



Heidi Berube 
Mark Blecher 
Johathan Davis 
Nicholas Finamore 
Kristen Fredrickson 
Jill Gallagher 
Alison Hughes 
Shelley Keith 
Theresa Lottery 
Elizabeth McCarthy 
Michael McGee 
Susan Merra 
Patricia O'Rourke 



161 



THE MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Terra 
Expires 

Acton John W. Putnam 1982 

Arlington John P. Donahue 1982 

Belmont Henry L. Hall, Jr. 1983 

Bolton Robert Smith 1984 

Boxborough John J. Shimkus, Vice Chairman 1982 

Carlisle Kenneth L. Bilodeau 1982 

Concord Kenneth Marriner, Jr., Secretary 1983 

Dover William C. Greene 1984 

Lancaster Jay M. Moody 1982 

Lexington Robert C. Jackson 1984 

Lincoln Ruth W. Wales 1983 

Needham Timothy J. O'Leary 1983 

Stow Paul Christopher 1984 

Sudbury Martin F. Craine 1983 

Wayland John B. Wilson, Chairman 1984 

Weston Theodore G. Papastavros 1984 

Ronald J. Fitzgerald, Superintendent-Director 

The primary purpose of a vocational-technical school is to provide a 
high school education while at the same time preparing students for good 
jobs, requiring specific skills and paying significantly more than minimum 
wage to high school graduates. Since the first class graduated in 1978, 
Minuteman Tech has been providing area employers with skilled young people 
trained for today's job market in 25 vocational and technical areas. These 
graduates also have virtually the same academic credentials as a traditional 
high school student. 

Each of these vocational and technical programs has an active advisory 
committee made up of representatives from industry who see to it that 
Minuteman Tech's curriculum and shop equipment stay in tune with industry's 
needs. In addition, Minuteman Tech's staff members feel it is just as 
important for students to acquire a solid academic foundation as it is for 
them to learn the skills of their occupation. 

In June, 1981 Minuteman Tech graduated its fourth senior class. 
Eighty-eight percent of the graduates went on to higher education or 
accepted positions in the career fields for which they had been trained 
(Prior to graduation, jobs with cooperating employers were held by 41 percent 
of the seniors.) The remaining 12 percent of the graduates took jobs out 
of their vocational major or were uncertain of their plans. 

Minuteman Tech is unusual among vocational schools since it also offers 
college preparation courses, and about IS percent of its graduates go on 
to college every year. The school also offers a unique Prep-Tech Program 
for gifted students who wish to prepare for top technical colleges. 

During 1981 a number of Minuteman Tech students won awards for their 
outstanding skills. Forestry students won the state championship in the 
Future Farmers of America Natural Resources Contest, and, representing 
Massachusetts, placed third in the Northeast Regional Contest where they 
competed against champions from 15 states. 

At the New England Flower Show, Minuteman Tech Horticulture students 

162 



won a gold medal for achievement and took first place in the educational 
category, scoring 98.3 points out of a possible 100 for their exhibit. 
Then they went on to win first place in the Northeast Regional Landscaping 
competition at the Eastern States Exposition and first place in the state 
Future Farmers of America Nursery/ Lands cape contest. 

In the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA) 1981 State Skills 
Competition, Minuteman Tech students were state champions in the Heating/ 
Ventilation/Air Conditioning, Printing, and Auto Body events; placed second 
in the Printing, Auto Mechanics, Small Engine Repair, and Commercial Art 
competitions; and placed third in the Printing, Automotive Machine Shop, 
Plumbing and Cosmetology events. The state winners went on to the National 
VICA Competition in Atlanta, and Minuteman Tech senior David Harris of 
Acton brought home a gold medal as the top printing student in the United 
States. Minuteman Tech junion David Frizzell of Belmont won an honorable 
mention in the National Heating/Ventilation/Air Conditioning competition. 

Mintueman Tech students also won honors in the State Distributive 
Education Clubs of America competition. Competing for the first time, 
Minuteman Tech's new Air Force Junior ROTC Coed Drill Team placed second 
in the New England Regional High School Drill Team Competition. 

In 1981 Minuteman Tech's varsity basketball team became the first 
team ever to qualify for the Division III North Massachusetts State Tourna- 
ment for four straight years. As a result, Coach Nick Papas was named 
Division III "Coach of the Year". 

Fiscal responsibility has always been a prime concern of the Minuteman 
Tech staff and School Committee. Minuteman Tech is proud of the fact that 
energy consumption in the school has been reduced more than 30% with micro- 
processor control, insulation, and revised scheduling of building use. 
Energy audits and technical assistance studies have been completed, and 
major projects now on the drawing board include wind generation of electricity 
and groundwater cooling. 

In addition, with the aid of a grant from the State Office of Energy 
Resources, all overhead doors are being insulated, mercury lamps are being 
replaced with more energy efficient netal halide lamps; boiler turbulators, 
destratification units and overhead strip doors are being installed, as well 
as an insulating cover for the swimming pool. 

Budget planning continues to be done with careful scrutiny of all 
programs for cost effectiveness. Despite rising costs and capacity enroll- 
ment, per pupil assessments to the member towns were held to the previous 
year's level. Minuteman Tech's Adult Education courses and Summer School 
are now run on a self-supporting basis with tuition paid by urogram uartici- 
pants covering program costs. These programs now serve more than 3500 adults 
and young people every year. The 1981 Summer School served 1044 students 
from 44 communities. 

During 1981 another town, Dover, joined the Minuteman Tech district, 
bringing to 16 the number of towns which are now members. William C. Greene 
represents Dover on the School Committee. Several other changes took place 
on the Committee. David Cook of Needham resigned and was replaced by Timothy 
J. O'Leary. Mr. Cook had been Chairman of the Occupational Advisory Committee 
which ultimately recommended that Needham join the Minuteman Tech district. 
Then he became Needham' s first representative on the Minuteman Tech School 



163 



Committee. Weston is now represented by Theodore G. Papastavros, succeding 
Annette DiStefano who was an active and enthusiastic member of the School 
Committee for five years. 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

Assessment for operating and capital costs for 7/1/81 to 6/30/82 based on 
the number of students from each member town attending Minuteman on 10/1/80 
as a percentage of the total number of students, per section V (c) of agree- 
ment. Assessment for special operating costs based on section IV (f) of 
agreement. 











CAPITAL 


SPECIAL 




TOWN 


PER CENT 


OPERATING 


+ (DEBT) + 


OPERATING = 


■ ASSESSMENT 


Acton 


9.240 


$ 


238,884 


$ 20,482 


$ 14,301 


$ 273,667 


Arlington 


28.585 




739,015 


63,364 


47,612 


849,991 


Belmont 


7.122 




184,127 


15,787 


12,555 


212,469 


Bolton 


1.732 




44,778 


7,200* 


1,582 


53,560 


Boxborough 


2.791 




72,156 


6,187 


4,911 


83,254 


Carlisle 


1.444 




37,332 


3,199 


1,505 


42,036 


Concord 


5.197 




134,359 


11,522 


13,335 


159,216 


Lancaster 


3.657 




94,545 


15,200* 


74 


109,819 


Lexington 


11.838 




306,051 


26,242 


31,729 


364,022 


Lincoln 


1.444 




37,332 


3,199 


4,959 


45,490 


Needham 


6.064 




156,774 


25,200* 


3,243 


185,217 


Stow 


6.160 




159,256 


13,653 


3,588 


176,497 


Sudbury 


8.662 




223,941 


19,202 


9,595 


252,738 


Way land 


5.005 




129,396 


11,094 


3,531 


144,021 


Weston 


1.059 




27,379 


2,347 


2,274 


32,000 


TOTALS 


100.000 


$2 


,585,325 


$243,878 


$154,794 


$2,983,997 




* Based or 


i a 


$400 per 


punil charge 







NOTE: The total assessment is only $119,448 more than that for the previous 
school year even though the operating and capital budget total rose 
5.56% from $7,105,033 in 1980-31 to $7,500,537 in 1981-82. This 
rise was offset by increased aid, tuition and other revenue, some of 
which was a one-time event. 



STATE AID RECEIVED BETWEEN JULY 1 of 1980 AND JUNE 30 of 1981 



CATEGORY 



AMOUNT RECEIVED 



Transportation $ 237,758.00 

Chapter 70 (includes Special Ed.) 1,620,434.00 

Construction Grant Chapter 645 1,211,134.00 

Regional Aid Chapter 71, 16d 266,331.00 

TOTAL S3, 335, 657. 00 



NOTE : 



Aid and district revenue are used to reduce assessments of costs to 
member towns . 



164 



Enrollment October 1, 1981 



Town 


Grade 9 


Grade 10 


Grade 11 


Grade 12 


Post 
Graduates 


Total 


Acton 


16 


19 


24 


21 


4 


84 

312 

74 

23 

26 

10 

59 

3 

53 

106 

12 

64 

66 

92 

37 

5 

183 


Arlington 


91 


78 


83 


50 


10 


Belmont 


20 


16 


11 


20 


7 


Bolton 


8 


7 


4 


2 


2 



Boxborough 


5 


4 


4 


13 


Carlisle 


2 


5 


2 


1 



3 


Concord 


20 


11 


10 


15 


Dover 


2 











1 


Lancaster 


16 


17 


11 


4 


5 


Lexington 


12 


31 


29 


27 


7 


Lincoln 
Needham 


2 
12 


2 

24 


3 
14 


5 
8 



6 


Stow 


17 


15 


16 


16 


2 


Sudbury 


20 


22 


17 


30 


3 


Way land 


4 


8 


14 


7 


4 


Weston 





3 


2 





o 


Tuition 


31 


49 


55 


32 


16 



TOTAL 



278 



311 



299 



:si 



54 



1412 




Steve Borden of Lincoln, a 1980 graduate of Mirtuteman 
Tech's printing program is now pursuing his chosen 
career as a printer at Orchard House, Inc. in Concord, 
Massachusetts . 



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rHCNCNCNCNCNCNtO 



167 



VITAL STATISTICS 

33 births, 44 marriages and 34 deaths have been recorded during 
the year L98J as follows: 

BIRTHS 



Date 


of 


Bin 


th 


1980 




Apr. 


2 


Apr. 


21 


Apr. 


23 



Dec. 13 



Dec. 14 



Name of Child 



Daniel Julin Wellington 
Andrew Wheelock Weyl 
William Jason McCune- 

Sanders 
Nicholas George Lincoln 

Chigas 
William Malcolm Constable 



Names of Parents 



Dec. 30 Elizabeth Carol Price 



Robert P & Anne 0. Wellington 
Alan J. & Jane B. Weyl 
William J. McCune 5 Georgiane 
M. Sanders 

Basil C. 6 Dianne W. Chigas 
William G $ Katherine P. 

Constable 
George E. 5 Carol P. Price 



1981 



Jan. 


9 


Jan. 


11 


Jan. 


29 


Jan. 


29 


Feb. 


5 


Mar. 


2 


Mar. 


3 


Mar. 


10 


Mar. 


10 


Mar. 


11 


Mar. 


18 


Mar. 


18 


Mar. 


25 


Apr. 


11 


Apr. 


16 


Apr. 


27 


May 


7 


June 


3 


June 


3 


June 


5 


June 


10 


Aug. 


19 


Sept 


. 4 


Sept 


, 4 


Sept 


2i 


Sept 


2! 


Oct. 


9 



Greta Raddatz Bradlee 
Robert Schiff Lee 
Elizabeth-Starr Mygatt 
Jennifer Denham Mygatt 
Rebecca Katherine McHugh 
Lindsay Russel Craig 
Julia Irene Briedis 
Samuel George Veitch 
Elizabeth Fowler McConchie 
Clifford Thomas Pontbriand 
Marisa Tartaglia 
Edward Y. U. Chan 
Katherine Faith-Bastea 

Dimancescu 
Margit Mihaly Winchell 
Adam Hardwick Gailey 
Joshua Warren Allison 
Justin Benjamin Moller Okin 
Susannah Grier Parke 
James Tucker Gilmore 
Emily Meghan McClain 
Louis Ward law Rosen 
Scott Michael MacLeod 
Xelle Renwick Sacknoff 
Julia Alexandra Cohen 
24 Bayard Peabody Love 
29 Corynne Michelle Mulcahy 
Lucas Peter Meyer Braun 



Benjamin C. 5 Martha R. Bradlee 
Thomas H. & Barbara F. Lee 
Samuel G. Mygatt S Susan M. Hall 
Samuel G. Mygatt S Susan M. Hall 
James F.X. 6 Katherine S. McHugh 
Stanley R. & Susan L. Craig 
John £ Irene S. Briedis 
Thomas A. f, Bridget E. Veitch 
James H. 6 Linda C. McConchie 
Thomas C. 5 Colleen W. Pontbriand 
Giovanni & Lucia S. Tartaglia 
David C. 5 Catherine T. Chan 

Dan P. 5 Katherine K. Dimancescu 
William F. 5 Katalin M. Winchell 
Timothy H. & Mary Ellen G. Gailey 
Geoffrey 6 Lesley B. Allison 
Robert L. 6 Susan M. Okin 
Nathan G. G Ann I. Parke 
Peter J. & Hilary W. Gilmore 
David S. 6 Wendie K. McClain 
David M. & Elizabeth K. Rosen 
George A. £ Elizabeth M. MacLeod 
Eric J. 6 Kathleen S. Sacknoff 
Donald H. Cohen 5 Diane B. Berman 
John C. Love £ Susan W. Peabody 
Douglas J. 6 Beverly M. Mulcahy 
Peter & Diane K. Braun 



168 



Date 


of 


Birth 


Oct. 


30 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 


18 


Nov. 


24 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


17 



Name of Child Name of Parents 



Joshua John Solar Robert L. $ Jane A. Solar 

Carrie Horton O'Neil David § Barbara M. O'Neil 

Phoebe Keyser Evans John C. & Elizabeth K. Evans 

Catherine Elizabeth Young Edward G. § Anne P. Young 

John Paul Solman Fred John, III § Claire M.L. Solman 

Heather Sterling MacNeil Bruce M. § Linda H. MacNeil 



169 



MARRIAGES 



Date of 
Marriage 

Jan. 10 



Feb. 14 



Mar. 7 



Mar. 14 



Names 



Residence 



John Stewart Waugh 
Paula Ruth Anderson 

Douglas L. Linneman 
Sherlyn Arms 

Patrick J. Dolan 
Robin H. Chipman 

Craig R. Bennett 
Florence Anne Aldrich 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Weston, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Chelmsford, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y 
Billerica, Mass. 



Mar. 20 J. West Abrashkin 
Diana C. Abramson 

Apr. 4 Gregory G. Bingham 
Anne Louise Ruwet 

Apr. 11 Douglas J. Mulcahy 
Beverly T. Ferris 

Apr. 25 William Emerson 
Pamela Anne Pace 

May 2 Kevin Ford 

Margaret Walkey 

May 2 Henry C. Pinkham 
Judith E. Moore 

May 9 Burton Archer Jones 
Nancy Curtiss Smith 

May 16 John S. Wilbor 

Anne Easton Black 

May 17 William S. Rudd 
Lynda Rasco 

May 23 Kenneth Sutherland Keenan 
Phyllis Mae Johannesen 

May 23 Richard E. Swanson 
Nancy Ann Lattanzio 



Haw ley, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Santa Paula, Calif. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Arlington, Mass. 
Arlington, Mass. 

Belmont, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

New York, N.Y. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Ogunquit, Maine 
Ogunquit, Maine 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Newburyport , Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



170 



Date of 
Marriage 

May 30 



June 6 



June 



Names 



Residence 



Kiyo Christoph Tabery 
Rebecca Howe Fernald 

John Francis Corini 
Sally Anne Henderson 

Andrew C. Pickett 
Katharine H. Fidler 



Springfield, Mass, 
Springfield, Mass 

Wakefield, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Stow, Mass. 



June 22 



Milton S. Page 
Beatrice R. Haartz 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



June 27 Mark Paul M. Szpak 
Robin Emily Mount 

June 28 William M. Preston 
Paul A. L. Miller 

July 3 Charles Koehler 
Tanya Almquist 

July 5 Alvan Markle, 4th 
Anne D. Wadsworth 

July 11 Christopher T. Lenk 
Veronica I. Kenney 

July 18 Stanley Easton Black 

Eleanor Charlotte Sudler 

July 18 Paul J. Berube, Jr. 
Donna Manzelli 

July 18 Surendra V. Shah 

Alice Woodward DeNormandie 

July 24 Kenneth C. Turner 
Beatrice Closson 

Aug. 15 Celvia 0. Merritt 
Marilyn M. Marion 

Aug. 28 Robert Malkin 

Julia Moulton Ragan 

Aug. 29 Neil A. Husher 
Helen L. Sims 



Manchester, N. H. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Concord, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 

Waltham, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 

Wheaton, Md. 
Wheat on, Md. 

Raynham, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Valley Stream, N. Y 
New York, N. Y. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 



171 



Date of 
Marriage 

Aug. 30 

Sept . 5 

Sept . 6 

Sept. 12 

Sept. 13 

Oct. 3 



Names 



Residence 



i rancis Peter Basi l e 
Joyce Lynn Spires 

William G. Shippen 
Susan E. Coan 

Joe Dale Croman 
Eleanor Shine Ting 

James Laffan 
Kate Brooks 

Bruce Wane Hoar 
Carolyn Marie Cullinane 

William M. Fitzgerald, Jr. 
Kathryn E. Berger 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Brighton, Mass. 

Acton, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Sudbury, Mass. 
Sudbury, Mass. 

Gardena, Calif. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Maynard, Mass. 

San Clemente, Calif. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Oct. 11 



Eric K. Deane 
Carolyn F. McQueen 



Lincoln, Mass 
Lincoln, Mass 



Oct. 17 



Sandip Tiwari 
Mari Lee Wallner 



Lincoln, Mass 
Lincoln, Mass 



Oct. 31 



Douglas Cleveland 
Sara Catherine Ross 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Nov. 20 John E. Smith 

Georgie K. Studley 

Nov. 27 Bruce A. Fraser 
Laura McQueeney 

Dec. 12 Roland J. Vazquez 

Margaret N. Jackson 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Glastonbury, Ct . 
Glastonbury, Ct. 

Watertown, Mass. 
Katertown, Mass. 



Dec. 27 



Philip Henry Brooks 
Susan Marie Callahan 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Dec. 29 Fredric J. Hopengarten Lincoln, Mass. 

Betty Ellen Herr Lincoln, Mass. 

Dec. 31 Howard S. Brower Lincoln, Mass. 

Andrea Cole Lincoln, Mass. 



172 



DEATHS 



Name 



Age 



Years Months Days 



Jeannine Louise Schofield 



20 



Katherine (Wood) Wells 

Lowell Mayberry Hollingsworth 

Isabella M. Mixon 

Deborah Lee Birt 

Arthur Eastham Thiessen 

Margaret Hoffman 

Barbara Ann Gavron 

Faith (Garrison) Harwood 

Ada M. Jump 

Michael Lentino 

Mary-Macy Shepard 
Mar. 30 Standish S. Rowe 
Apr. 16 George C. Newton, Jr. 
May 4 Ora Mary Suanders 
May 18 Olive Grace Barr 

Katherine (Murray) Cousins 

Kathrene Brett 

Arthur Oswell Siteman 

Mary Gertrude Kelley 

Martha Rose Crocker 

David Joseph Hines 

E. William Riker 

Grace Messina 

Earl F. Rivers 

Flora MacLean 

William McNear Rand 

Marion Lois Hurd 
Oct. 28 Donna (Adams) Fraser 
Nov. 2 David Hynes Stimmell 

Anson M. DuBois 

Edward A. Danosky 

Regina Griglik 

Marion B. Blair 

Louise Frances DeSmedt 



72 
74 
86 
47 
76 
87 
25 
70 
90 
87 
48 
76 
61 
81 
73 
78 
87 
86 
83 
18 
57 
92 
82 
48 
72 
95 
89 
67 
71 
85 
68 
81 
70 
94 



25 



173 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Abbott, John A. & Diana B. 
Abbott, Margaret G. 5 Walter D. 
Abele, Bradford L. 5 Rosemary M. 
Ackley, Wallace E. S Ethel G. 
Adams, F. Douglas S Patricia 
Adams, George H. £ Velda 
Adams, John & Patricia, 5 Adams, 

Peter & Sharon 
Adams, John Quincy £ Lucy D. 
Adams, John Quincy, Lemire, R.A., & 

Donaldson, D.M. 
Adams , Ramel le C. 
Adamson, William M. $ Barbara M. 
Adelstein, Mary T. & S. James 
Adkins, Robert H. $ Alison C. 
Adler, Harold 
Adler, Harold 5 Ivy Ruth 
Adler, Harold, Tr. , Grove Realty Trust 
Adler, Ivy Ruth 
Alfieris, Michael 
Algeo, Leo J. § Elaine T. 
Algonquin Gas Transmission Co. 
Allen, Richard A. & Petronella R.M. 
Allen, Robert L. 5 Carol B. 



Allen, Stephen A. 


[II 


Allen, Walter P. 




Allison, 


John R. $ 


Marion S. 


Allison, 


W i 1 1 i am S , 


. 6 Caroline P. 


Althausen, Alex F. 


5 Emily D.L. 


Ames, Adelbert III 


& Wilson, Mary 


Faith 






American 


Tel. & Tel. Co. 


Ammen, David L. 6 Judith B. 


Andersen, 


, Grace A. 




Anderson , 


, Carl L. 




Anderson , 


, Lawrence 


B. 


Anderson , 


, Mildred D. & Ronald F. 


Anderson , 


, Sandra B, 




Andrews , 


Francis S. 


& Dorothy W. 



Angell, Craig W. £ Carolyn G. 
Appleyard, Norman Jr. & Lillian T. 
Aprille, Thomas J. $ Amelia J. 
Armstrong, C. Robert 
Armstrong, John L. 
Arshad, Gulrez 5 Sara C. 
Art, Robert J. & Suzanne 
Asaff, Annis G. & Patricia F. 
Asaff, Ernest M. & Colette F. 
Atchley, Dana W. Jr. & Barbara S.P 
Austin, Richard C. & Marcia W. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 131,700 


$ 2,186.22 




135,900 


2,225.94 




195,400 


3,243.64 




400 


6.64 




98,100 


1,628.46 




54,800 


909.68 




296,500 


4,921.90 




481,700 


7,996.22 




161,600 


2,682.56 




355,400 


5,899.64 




135,200 


2,244.32 




20,800 


345.28 




118,700 


1,970.42 




11,700 


194.22 




264,500 


4,390.70 




152,000 


2,523.20 




4,500 


74.70 




116,400 


1,932.24 




109,400 


1,816.04 


196, 172 




3,256.46 




91,700 


1 ,522.22 




132,100 


2,192.86 




132,200 


2,194.52 




140,700 


2,335.62 




133,500 


2,216.10 




156,100 


2,591.26 




224,700 


3,730.02 




196,500 


3,261.90 


80,900 




1,342.94 




207,500 


3,444.50 




370,700 


6,153.62 




122,200 


2,028.52 




165,900 


2,753.94 




100,100 


1,661.66 




130,700 


2,169.62 




224,100 


20.06 




209,200 


3,472.72 




145,700 


2,418.62 




56,400 


936.24 




155,300 


"-.98 




I . 300 


5,350.18 




240,000 


3,984.00 




107,700 


1,"- 




149,100 


"5.06 




113,800 


1,889.08 




190,600 


5,163.96 




19", 200 


3,273.5: 



174 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Avery, Abigail D. 



$ 154,800 



2,569.68 



S. 



L.S. 



Bachrach, Alan Jr. 

Bacon, Horatio W. § Anne D 

Baggs., Arthur Jr. $ Marion 

Bahceli, Yashar & Laura 

Bailey, Stephen K. 

Baird, Gordon P. & Sarah F 

Baldwin, Jacqueline L. 

Baldwin, Roger P. § Mary 

Ballou, Mildred A. 

Balogh, Karoly $ Judith 

Banks, Talcott M. 

Barbarow, Ruth 

Bardsiey, Theodore J. £ Doris A. 

Bare, Bruce M. § Helen S. 

Barkas, Christopher W. £, Mary Ann 

Barker, W.B. § Janet B. 

Barnaby, John M. $ Charlotte B. 

Barnes, Benjamin A. § Ann B. 

Barnet, James R. 

Barr, Edgar E. $ Olive H. 

Barrett, Alan H. & Virginia M. 

Barry, Jon T. & Barbara M. 

Bartovics, William A. § Susan L. 

Barzun, Roger, £ Winthrop, Robert, Trs 

Basmajian, Vasken § Shoghig 

Bassett, Kenneth E. 

Batchelder, Robert R. $ Hannah W. 

Bay Bank/Newton-Waltham 

Beal, Bruce A. & Enid L. 

Beal, Thomas P. Jr. $ Barbara B. 

Beck, Gary E. $ Charlotte S. Price 

Beenhouwer, Owen & Lillemor 

Begelfer, David I., Tr. , EDC Trust 

Belanger, Michael P. & Gisa E. 

Bel anger, Walter E. 5 Mary F. 

Bell, C. Gordon $ Gwendolyn K. 

Bell, Roger A. 

Bell, Roger A. & Weinstein, Barbara G. 

Belle, Gene & Irene 

Bemis, Ann C. 

Bennett, Doris E. 

Benson, John R. $ Allott, Kathryn J. 

Benson, Peter M. $ Ann D. 

Bent ley, Barbara Hyde 

Bentley, Robert P. 

Bentley, Robert P. $ Joyce S. 

Benton, Stephen A. & Jennne L. 



900 



24,700 



133,900 
128,400 
127,800 
91,200 
131,100 
216,500 
113,300 



154 
55 



100 
100 



200,700 
246,900 
42,600 
74,900 
152,900 
109,000 
139,600 
119,200 
156,700 
199,800 
145,000 
122,600 
197,200 
130,800 
320,200 
143,800 
90,800 
239,600 

260,000 
291,200 
127,400 

61,800 
113,600 

64,000 
100,400 
151,600 

91,800 
124,700 
112,100 
145,000 
115,400 

93,300 
107,700 

41,600 

86,000 
193,500 
107,700 



2,237.68 
2,131.44 
2,121.48 
1,513.92 
2,176.26 
3,593.90 
1,880.78 
2,558.06 

914.66 
3,331.62 
4,098.54 

707.16 
1,243.34 
2,538.14 
1,809.40 
2,317.36 
1,978.72 
2,601.22 
3,316.68 
2,407.00 
2,035.16 
3,273.52 
2,171.28 
5,315.32 
2,387.08 
1,507.28 
3,977.36 

410.02 
4,316.00 
4,833.92 
2,114.84 
1,025.88 
1,885.76 
1,062.40 
1,666.64 
2,516.56 
1,523.88 
2,070.02 
1,860.86 
2,407.00 
1,915.64 
1 .548.78 
1 ,787.82 

690.56 
1,427.60 
5,:08.78 
1 ,78' 



175 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Berenson, Sheldon J. £ Carol U. 
Bergen, Kenneth W. & Emily F. 
Bergen, Kenneth W. $ Bator, Peter A., 

Trustees 
Berger, Ralph 5 Carol H. 
Berman, Diane B. £ Cohen, Donald H. 
Berman, Donald S. $ Edith M. 
Bernard, Clark L. & Susana R. 
Bibring, George L. $ Marcia G. 
Bienfang, Don C. & Denise R. 
Bikales, Norman $ Ann B. 
Billings, Bruce H. 
Billings, Sarah W. 
Birkett, James D. d, Sarah P. 
Birmingham, James G. £ Carolyn 
Bjork, Albion P. & Elizabeth 
Black, Everett A. S Anne E. 
Black, Stanley E. 
Black, Thomas E. 
Blair, Paul C. & Marion B. 
Blanchard, Eilene 
Blood, David W. & Iva D. 
Bobbitt, Lake H. & Sarah G. 
Boccadoro, Joseph $ Ida 
Bockoven, John Sanbourne & Dorothy Ruth 
Boersner, Wolfram A. S Doris M. 
Bogner, Walter F. 
Bolt, Richard H. & Katherine L. 
Bolton, David W. £ Shirley M. 
Bolton, Warren R. § Doris A. 
Bombara, John J. £ Maria I. 
Bond, Roger B. & Elizabeth C. 
Booth, Alice Burrage 
Booth Robert H. 
Boquist , Wal lace P. 
Boro, Gilbert V., Tr. , Greeridge 

Realty Trust 
Boro, Gilbert V. $ Begelfer, David., 

Trs., Endevor Realty Trust 
Boston Edison Co. 
Boston Gas Co. 

Bovey, Martin K. 5 Eleanor Hope 
Bower, Joseph L. S Nancy M. 
Bowles, Clifford 
Boyce, James B. & Man ley B. II 
Boyce, Man ley B. $ Karen K. 
Boyer, Edward 

Boyer, Edward, £ Donnelly, Roberta 
Boyer, John H. 
Boyer, Louis L. & Elaine T. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real ;ind 


Personal 


Real 


I'c rsonal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 119,400 


$ 1,982.04 




303,700 


5,041.42 




91,800 


1,523.88 




137,600 


2,284.16 




146,600 


2,433.56 




165,000 


2,739.00 




195,400 


3,243.64 




122,200 


2,028.52 




139,700 


2,319.02 




213,100 


3,537.46 




9,000 


149.40 




7,700 


127.82 




66,900 


1,110.54 




191,300 


3,175.58 




160,400 


2,662.64 




321,900 


5,343.54 




49,200 


816.72 




68,200 


1,132.12 




307,100 


5,097.86 




89,700 


1,489.02 




89,200 


1,480.72 




115,400 


1,915.64 




4,000 


66.40 




122,700 


2,036.82 




139,300 


2,312.38 




154,700 


2,568.02 




215,900 


3,583.94 




108,500 


1,801.10 




12,500 


207.50 




115,600 


1,918.96 




119,300 


1,980.38 




6,100 


101.26 




249,000 


4,133.40 




302,200 


5,016.52 




756,800 


12,562.88 




335,000 


5,561.00 


4,781,700 


59,700 


80,367.24 


900,000 




14,940.00 




152,500 


2,531.50 




219,800 


3,648.68 




116,500 


1,933.90 




"4,800 


:i.68 




114,900 


1 ,907.34 




128,100 


2,126.46 




98,400 


1,633.44 




182,200 


3,024.52 




111,800 


1,855.88 



176 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Boyer, Markley H. § Julie M. 
Boynton, Daniel C. $ Janet K. 
Braasch, John W. £ Nancy K. 
Bradford, Robert L. $ Muriel H. 
Bradlee, Benjamin C. & Martha Jean 
Bradlee, Henry G. Ill & Sandra N. 
Bradley, Clifford $ Jeannette E. 
Bradley, David H. , Trustee 
Bradley, Phillip H. £ Louise W. 
Brady, Robert A. § Sullivan, Martha 

Howe 
Brain, J. Walter & Patricia L. 
Brandt, John H. & Marilyn R. 
Brannen, Robert C. & Barbara A. 
Braucher, William M. , Trustee 
Braude, Stephen E. 
Braun, Morton B. & Esther K. 
Bravoco, Ralph & Vivian 
Brennen, William L. S Eleanor A. 
Briedis, John 5 Irene S. 
B riggs, David L. $ Elaine M. 
Brisson, Evelyn W. $ Norman F. 
Brodney, Lawrence & Myra 



& Mary J. 

C. £ Catherine M 



Brogna, Gerald W. 

Bronson, Franklin 

Brooks, Paul 

Brower, Howard S., Trustee 

Brown, Arthur E. $ Margaret S. 

Brown, Elizabeth G. 

Brown, Herbert L. & Theresa 

Brown, John B. & Ann P. 

Brown, Robert P. & Jeane, Trs . 

Brown, Robert W. $ Lee G. 

Browne, Secor D. £ Mary D. 

Bucci, Frank P. $ Arlene M. 

Buchan, William R. $ Barbara C. 

Bucher, Edward A. $ Gail J. Phillips 

Buckler, Marilyn L. 

Buerger, Martin J. $ Lila 

Buonopane, Paul J. § Mary 

Burckett, Douglas M. $ Phillippa C. 

Burk, George W. $ Ruth M. 

Burk, Ruth M. 

Burke, Ruth Bemis 

Burke, Walter J. Jr. $ Helen M. 

Bumham, Robert Bolt $ M. Elaine 

Burns, Melvin P. $ Elizabeth F. 

Burroughs-Smith 

Burt, William F. § Donna G. 

Butler, William B. £ Mary Jane 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 385,600 


$ 6,400.96 




83,800 


1,391.08 




218,500 


3,627.10 




94,500 


1,568.70 




118,200 


1,962.12 




211,600 


3,512.56 




49,000 


813.40 




200 


3.32 




147,700 


2,451.82 




103,700 


1,721.42 




72,100 


1,196.86 




217,900 


3,617.14 




182,400 


3,027.84 




63,400 


1,052.44 




251,000 


4,166.60 




143,000 


2,373.80 




163,900 


2,720.74 




105,000 


1,743.00 




181,900 


3,019.54 




178,300 


2,959.78 




122,200 


2,028.52 




63,000 


1,045.80 




269,000 


4,465.40 




127,200 


2,111.52 




202,400 


3,359.84 




262,000 


4,349.20 




163,700 


2,717.42 




232,100 


3,852.86 




145,600 


2,416.96 




64,100 


1,064.06 




94,800 


1,573.68 




70,500 


1,170.30 




143,100 


2,375.46 




148,300 


2,461.78 




108,500 


1,801.10 




108,200 


1,796.12 




151,300 


2,511.58 




190,600 


3,163.96 




112,200 


1,962.52 




163,500 


2,714.10 




105,600 


1,752.96 




127,200 


2,111.52 




213,900 


3,550.74 




136,400 


2,264.24 




136,900 


2,272.54 




105,000 


1,743.00 


4,300 




71.38 




139,700 


2,319.02 




122,800 


2,038.48 



177 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1. 1981 



Butler, William H. $ Nancy G. 

Butts , Louise M. 

Bye, Willis E. $ Angela H. 

Byrnes, F. Michael 

Byrnes, William L. £ Mary E. 



Cabot , Mary D.G. 

Caldwell, Sarah 

Campobasso, Anthony B. $ Dorothy M. 

Cannon, Bradford & Ellen DeN. 

Cannon, Robert Laurent £ Betty H. 

Cantlin, Antoinette 

Cantlin, John H. & Antoinette H. 

Cantu, Robert C. $ Jane Q. 

Cappetta, Charles J. 

Cappucci, Thomas A. & Barbara A. 

Caras, Byron § Anastasia 

Caras, Ophair $ Florence L. 

Carley, John A. § Joan Keir 

Carlo, Peter A. $ Cheryl A. 

Carlson, Christopher 5 Jane F. 

Carman, John W. § Eleanor T. 

Carmen, William I. & Louise 

Carmody, Sean £ Leie 



Carroll 


Irene J. 


Carroll 


, Marjory M. 


Carroll 


Richard P. 5 Elaine M 


Carrol 1 


Nancy M. , Trustee 


Carter, 


John H. 


Caruso , 


Robert $ Abbie 


Carver, 


Jack K. £ Donna D. 


Casilio 


Frank G. 



Caskey, Walter H. $ Anna H. 

•Cassidy, Henry J. 6 Verna E. 

Cassidy, Robert E. & Isabelle 

Cassidy, Verna E. 

Castle, Clifford D. & Joan E. 

Caswell, John Ross $ Carol B. 

Chalilpoyil, Purush 6 Bauks , Kerstin V 

Champeny, John C. 6 Leona G. 

Champion, Craig W. Jr. £ Teresa L. 

Chan, David C.W. $ Catherine T. 

Chapin, Bertha L. 

Chapin, Margaret E. 

Chaplin, Peter G. 

Charm, Shirley 5 Stanley E. 

Chase, Barbara S. 

Chase, Irving, 

Cheever, Daniel S. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 117,200 


$ 1 ,945.52 




225,200 


5,738.32 




260,000 


4,316.00 




113,700 


1 ,887.42 




183,400 


3,044.44 




183,700 


3,049.42 




199,900 


3,318.34 




105,100 


1 ,"44.66 




273,800 


4,545.08 




129,600 


2,151.36 




204,300 


5,591.38 




241,700 


4,012.22 




128,500 


2,133. 10 


1,300 




21.58 




109,800 


1,822.68 




140,500 


2,532.30 




101 ,900 


1,691.54 




170,000 


2,822.00 




144,400 


2,397.04 




122,600 


2,055.16 




139,300 


2,512.58 




183,000 


5,057.80 




151,800 


2,519.88 




83,600 


1,587.76 




82,900 


1 ,376. 14 




72,300 


1 ,200. 18 




82,400 


l,3< 




:"9,400 


4,658.04 




152,300 


>6. 18 




109,300 


1,814.58 




92,000 


1,527.2 




1-4,900 


2,903.34 




10,200 


169.32 




86,900 


1 , -: .: 




63,100 


1,04". 46 




"6,000 


1 .261.60 




145,600 


2,416.96 




.500 


1,618.50 




245,700 


4,045.42 




140,300 


28.98 




156,700 


269.22 




.500 


4,525.50 




105,100 


1,711.46 




145,600 


: . .- • 




61,600 


1 ,022.56 




.000 


.3.40 




255,900 


- 17.94 




145,600 


2 .-16.96 



17 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Chen, Sow-Hsin & Ching-Chih 

Cherniack, Jerome R. § Elizabeth E. 

Chigas, Dianne Was ley 

Chin, Joseph B. $ Barbara Jeanne 

Chiotelis, Charles L. § Iasme J. 

Chipman, Robert H. § Mary F. 

Chisholm, Edward C. $ Margaret F. 

Chisholm, James P. § Ann K. 

Chopra, Deepak, Rita 

Chou, Harry H.S. § Lily 

Christensen, Ronald § Sasha M. 

Chu, Chauncy C. $ Margaret C.Y. 

Chu, Ge Yao $ Wei Ying 

Chuan, Marian K. 

Church, Robert T. § Priscilla S. 

Ciampi, Mary P. 

Ciaramaglia, Frederick J. § Marcia P. 

Cibel, Stanley A. § Thelma W. 

Ciraso, Anne § Jennie 

Cisneros , Diego A. § Maria 

Clark, Clifford A. § Patricia D. 

Clarke, James R. 

Cleary, Michael P. 

Coan, Thomas & Catherine M. 

Coane, Amolia 

Cobbler £ Cordwainer 

Coburn, Minnie E. & Est. of Edward 

Coffin, Stewart T. S Jane M.L. 

Cohen, Jacques 

Cole, Edwin M. & Lucy F. 

Cole, Hugh § Cooper, Anne H. 

Coleman, Mary Murray 

Collins, Laurence A. £ Janet S. 

Collins, Margery P. & Arthur IV. Jr. 

Comjean, Bruce P. § Marlies 

Comjean, Marc G. § Judith K. 

Como, Florence J. 

Comstock, Charles B. § Joan M. 

Cone, Thomas E. Jr. £ Barbara C. 

Con ley, David P. 

Connol ly , David J. 

Connolly, J. Irving & Evelyn 

Conrad, Peter, Bradshaw, Ylisabyth, 

Lieberman, Jack, £ Bachman, Laura 
Conroy, Grace W. £ John F. 
Constable, Katherine M. & William G. 
Constantine, Katherine P. 
Cook, Jacqueline H. 
Cook, Paul W. Jr. & Marion M. 
Coolidge, Henry P. $ Alice C. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 33,200 


$ 551.12 




98,700 


1,638.42 




136,500 


2,265.90 




120,900 


2,006.94 




158,100 


2,624.46 




106,200 


1,762.92 




91,700 


1,522.22 




152,800 


2,536.48 




246,000 


4,083.60 




135,400 


2,247.64 




163,100 


2,707.46 




155,200 


2,576.32 




211,600 


3,512.56 




135,800 


2,254.28 




164,500 


2,730.70 




112,900 


1,874.14 




169,900 


2,820.34 




101,400 


1,683.24 




142,000 


2,357.20 




55,000 


913.00 




167,700 


2,783.82 




157,100 


2,607.86 




85,700 


1,422.62 




72,600 


1 ,205. 16 




46,100 


765.26 


700 




11.62 




103,200 


1,713 12 




110,400 


1,832.64 




1 44 , 300 


2,395.38 




134,300 


2,229.38 




257,700 


4,277.82 




160,100 


2,657.66 




105,100 


1,~44.66 




174,900 


. 2,903.34 




194,800 


3,233.68 




139,300 


2,312.58 




110,600 


1 ,835.96 




11 2, 600 


1,869. 16 




164,900 


2. "5". 54 




61,800 


1 ,025.88 




24,100 






184,700 


3,066.02 




122,200 


2,028. 52 




"3.900 


1 ,226. "4 




1 13,800 






109,000 






97,000 


1 .oln.20 




205,900 


3 , i 1 




202, 100 


3 . 3 5 



179 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



S Nancy M. 
Elizabeth 



Lucy M.A 
Lucy M.A 



Coons, Richard D. fj Nancy J. 

Cooper, Ami el G. {j Lorna 

Cooper, E. Crawley S M. Jane 

Cope, Elizabeth W. 

Cope, Robert DeN., Trustee 

Copeland, Charles L. 5 Muriel 

Cope land, Robert C. $ Ruth R. 

Coppolino, Michael J 

Corcoran, Robert P. 

Cormack, Allan M. 

Corrigan, Mary 

Costello, Thomas F. 

Cotoia, Anthony J. & 

Cotoia, Anthony J. & Lucy M.A., Trs , 

Cotoia, Lucy M.A. 

Cotoni , Joseph 

Country Hair Fashions 

Courtney, J. Donald & Elaine H. 

Cousins, Ashley B. 

Cousins, Jeanne B. & Est. of Lawrence B 

Cowles, Addison £ Alexandra C. 

Craig, Robert W. £ Amy T. 

Craig, Stanley R. Jr. § Susan L. 

Crandall, Stephen H. $ Patricia E. 

Crawford, John D. § Joanna W. 

Crook, Constance S. 

Crowe, Mary B. 

Culver, Perry J . 

Culver, Perry J. 6 Kate S. 

Cummings, William R. $ Palma M. 

Cunningham, J. Lewis & Ruth P. 

Cunningham, James F. 

Cunningham, Robert M. & Claire 

Cunningham, Robert Allen $ Margaret 

Cutter, Robert A. 



daCosta, David G. 5 Gomes, Dianna J 
D'Al leva's Hair Designs 
Dalli, Francis J. & Mary E. 
Dallos, Andras & Zsusanna 
Dalrymple, Chester $ Jean 
Dalrymple, Sidney C. f, Dorothy C. 
Dam i co** Louise 
Pamico, Ralph P. $ Elvira 
Damico, Ralph P. Jr. 6 Edwina 
Damon, J. Gilbert 5 Prise ilia A. 
Dane, Robert & Lydia H. 
Pane, Benjamin f, Alexandra C. 
Daniels, Bruce G. & Janet B. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


onal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 236,700 


$ 3,929.22 




187,800 


3,117.48 




150,000 


2,490.00 




120,300 


1 ,996.98 




155,800 


2,586.28 




148,700 


2,468.42 




245,600 


4,076.96 




80,700 


1,339.62 




137,400 


2,280.84 




19,000 


315.40 




143,000 


2,373.80 




228,200 


3,788.12 




151,400 


2,513.24 




26,000 


431.60 




142,600 


2,367.16 




115,700 


1,920.62 


1,600 




26.56 




94,500 


1 ,568.70 




65,600 


1,088.96 




122,000 


2,025.20 




99,400 


1,650.04 




127,400 


2,114.84 




152,800 


2,536.48 




180,600 


2,997.96 




165,400 


2,745.64 




90,000 


1,494.00 




163,500 


2,714.10 




30,600 


507.96 




269,400 


4,472.04 




97,500 


1,618.50 




117,500 


1,950.50 




87,300 


1,449.18 




95,300 


1,581.98 




168,400 


. ."95.44 




148,800 


2,470.08 




281,400 


4,671.24 


700 




11.62 




128,200 


2,128.12 




102,300 


1,698. 18 




222,900 


3,700.14 




222,100 


3,686.86 




91,800 


1,523.88 




174,400 


2,895.04 




55,700 


924.62 




126,400 


2,098.24 




564,300 


6 , 1 




330,500 


5,486.30 




262,700 


4,360.82 



180 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Danosky, Edward A. § Mary C. 

Darling, 0. Leonard £ Barbara M. 

Darling, Eugene M. Jr. 

Darman, Richard G. 

D'Arrigo Bros. Co. of Mass. 

d'Autremont, Chester C. g Ruth W. 

Davidson, Robert W. & Cynthia A. 

Davis, Prescott L. 

Davis, Ronald C. & Barbara C. 

Davis, Sherman P. $ Phyllis M. 

Davis, Sherman P. 

Davis, William A. £ R. May 

Davy, Louise W. & Edgar W. 

Dawes, Donald L. & Ruth K. 

de la Pena, Miguel § Irma 

Dean, Robert L. & Denise J. 

Dean, William M. § Lorraine C. 

DeBaryshe, Paul & Louise 

deCisneros, Maria H. 

Dedell, Harry C. & Marjorie P. 

DeJesus, John & Geneva Ann 

D'Elia, John A. § Maria Carmela 

Delori, Francois C. & Rosamond P. 

Delori, Rosamond P. & Putnam, James A 

Denehy, Edward J. § Bernadetta 

Denholm, A. Stuart S Jane Leslie 

Denison, Mary Smith 

DeNormandie, Alice W. 

DeNormandie, James 

DeNormandie, James £ Martha 

DeNormandie, Philip Y. 

DeNormandie, Robert L. & Eliana 

DeNormandie, James, Thomas L. , 

Katherine B. § Victoria L. 
Derbyshire, Helen L. 
Desai, Samir A. § Nilima S. 
desCognets, Archer B. & Gwendolyn G. 
Deterling, Ralph A. Jr. & Mary Ann 
Dewey, Edward & Zel la 
Dewey, Edward S. & Laurie T. 
Dexter, Barbara C. 
Diab, Constance 
Dickey, Dana H. & Emy P. 
Dickie, Richard I. $ Julia G. 
DiGiovanni, Guy P. & Teresa E. 
Dilg, Gi les 

Di 1 Iman , Douglas S. S Virginia S. 
Dillon, Jeanne L. 6 Catherine A. 
Diminico, Antonette $ Est. of Louis 
Dinerstein, Gordon 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 118,900 


$ 1,973.74 




148,500 


2,465.10 




141,200 


2,343.92 




154,800 


2,569.68 




79,800 


1,324.68 




335,000 


5,561.00 




75,400 


1,251.64 




118,500 


1,967.10 




103,700 


1,721.42 




239,300 


3,972.38 




129,100 


2,143.06 




131,100 


2,176.26 




168,600 


2,798.76 




125,900 


2,089.94 




128,100 


2,126.46 




69,400 


1,152.04 




99,800 


1 ,656.68 




124,600 


2,068.36 




151,900 


2,521.54 




117,000 


1,942.20 




163,200 


2,709.12 




168,500 


2,797.10 




136,300 


2,262.58 




21,000 


348.60 




175,600 


2,914.96 




169,600 


2,815.36 




238,700 


3,962.42 




240,500 


3,992.30 




15,500 


257.30 




263,900 


4,380.74 




288,700 


4,792.42 




179,800 


2,984.68 




57,200 


949.52 




200 


3.32 




65,000 


1 ,079.00 




216,700 


3,597.22 




177,000 


2,938.20 




137,700 


2,285.82 




259,400 


4,306.04 




228,500 


3,793.10 




326,300 


5,416.58 




80,300 


1,332.98 




111,400 


1,849.24 




132,300 


2,196.18 




151,000 


2,506.60 




122,800 


2,038.48 




96,200 


1 ,596.92 




178,600 


2,964.76 




143,700 


2,383.4: 



181 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



DiToro, Michael H. 
Dixon, Russell J. 6 Theresa J. 
Hi \on , Mi Lburn -J . , Trustee 
Doherty, James H. t] Ellen 
Doherty, William R. S Phyllis M. 
Doherty' S (".a rage Inc. 
Dolinsky, Larry R. § Joan Piatt 
Domenichel la , Domenic 
Domenichella, Frank A. Jr. 
Domenichel la , Frank A. Jr. § Margaret 
Donald, David Herbert & Aida D. 
Dona Ldson , Astrid L. 
Donaldson, Charlotte L. 
Donaldson, David M. £j Lynn B. 
Donaldson, Gordon A. 
Donaldson, Gordon A. £ Elizabeth A. 
Donaldson, Malcolm L. 
Donaldson, Astrid L. , Exec. 
Donaldson, Robert D. Jr., Admin. 
P. , Trust 
5 Marion L. 



Donaldson, Donald 

Donne 11 , Samuel H 

Donovan, Andrew E 

Donovan, Donna M. 

Donovan, Leo A. § 

Dooley, Thomas J. 

Dorian, Paul J. $ 

Dougherty, Allen R. £ Helen M 

Doughty, Joseph M. 

Downey, Edward F. 

Elaine R. 

Leonard H. 

Nicholas V 
, Lillian W. 



El inor C. 
Jr. $ Helen 
Susan A. 



§ Elizabeth F 



Downs 
Dowse 
Drago 
Drake 



§ Amy R. 
& Sara M. 

& G armory, Bertha V 
Dreisbach, Timothy A. & Patricia F. 
Drew, Frederic T. & Shirley D. 
Driscoll, Daniel F. £ Constance 
Duanc, Neil F. § Floretta E. 
DuBois, Olive S. 
Duborg, George F. 
Duffy, .lames E. III. & Barbara G. 
Durnan, John P. f, Leona E. 
Durso, Muriel I. 
Dustin, Daniel E. 
Dyer, Cheryl 



Eckhardt , Homer D. 
Elder, George D. & Diana H. 
Elkus, Howard F. & Lorna 
Elliott, William G. 6 Peggy G. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Va lue of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 99,700 


$ 1,655.02 




107,800 


1,789.48 




1 3 , 600 


225.76 




126,400 


2,098.24 




196,600 


3,263.56 




220,600 


3,661.96 




99,700 


1 ,655.02 




31,400 


521.24 




7,400 


122.84 




87,900 


1,459.14 




188,000 


3,120.80 




149,100 


2,475.06 




37,600 


624.16 




338,500 


6,449. 10 




231,000 


3,834.60 




174,900 


2,903.34 




285,900 


45.94 




300 


4.98 




104,600 


1 ,"36.36 




900 


14.94 




160,000 


2,656.00 




111 ,300 


1,84 




111,400 


1,849.24 




235,100 


3,869.46 




79,400 


1,318.04 




129,500 


2,149.^0 




73,900 


1,22 




81,300 


1,549.58 




84,700 


1,406.02 




158,200 


2,626.12 




161,800 


2,685.88 




155,500 


2,548.10 




"5,-00 


1,22 




101,600 


1,686.56 




'",900 


1,293.14 




"1 ,"00 


1,190.22 




106,600 


1.-69.56 




72,700 


1 ,206.82 




15 ".800 


2,2* 




256,000 


:9.60 




105,400 


:9.64 




11", 000 


l ,9-:. : 




108,500 


1,801.10 




90,400 


1,500.64 




126,900 


2,106.54 




124,500 


2,065.38 




181,000 


5,004.60 




216,000 


5,585.60 






VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Ellis, Eloise G. 

Ellis, Alexander Jr. $ Nancy B. 

Elwell, Mary M. 

Elwood, David M. § Carol Jean 

Emerson, Claire G. 

Emerson, William 

Emery, .Alice W. 

Emery, Mary B. 

Emmons, A. Bradlee § Judith Reed 

England, Albert $ Priscilla S. 

Eppling, Frederic J. § Sarah J. 

Ericson, Herbert E. § Erlyne R. 

Eshleman, Dean B. 

Estridge, Kenneth W. 

Evangelista, Florenzo § Dorothy I 

Evans, Lewis M. § Mary Lou 

Evans, Lucius W. § Cynthia F. 

Everett, Jean M. § Robert R. 



Faddoul, Feorge P. § Natalie 
Fairbanks, Alan R. § Diane A, 
Falender, Andrew J. 
Faran, James J. $ Ellen G. 
Fargo, Foster M. Jr. § Susan 
Farny, Michael H. § Ethel H. 
Farrell, Philip J. $ Ruth E. 
Feeney, James H. § 
Fegley, H. William 
Feinberg, Bernice 
Feldman, Roger D. $ Deborah W 
Felegian, Peter $ Marion 0. 
Felix, James E. 
Fenijn, Chris J. § 
Fernald, George H. 
Ferri, Edward J . $ 
Ferro, Armand F. $ 
Finlay, Allan R. $ 
Finnerty, James J. 
Finnerty, Richard 
Finney, Ross L. § 
Finsmith, Irene D. 
Fiorelli, Ernest R. 
Fiscale, Joseph, Tr, 

Realty Trust 
Fischer, Kenneth A. 
Fisher, John W. 

Fitts, Gertrude A. (Mrs. Eveleth Todd) 
Fitzgerald, Derek J. $ Eleanor M. 
Fitzgerald, John H. & Thelma C. 



Marie L. 
$ Diane C, 



Yvonne 

Jr. § Eleanor 

Eleanor J . 
r Jacqueline M. 
• Lucy Allen 

$ Anna C. 
E. $ Wendy N. 
Laura R. 

$ Rose M. 
, Deerhaven 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 225,800 


$ 3,748.28 




302,500 


5,021.50 




147,500 


2,448.50 




102,300 


1,698.18 




88,500 


1,469.10 




140,300 


2,328.98 




135,000 


2,241.00 




132,200 


2,194.52 




205,300 


3,407.98 




227,100 


3,769.86 




106,500 


1,767.90 




135,000 


2,241.00 




73,700 


1,223.42 




206,700 


3,431.22 




66,200 


1,098.92 




111,500 


1,850.90 




307,000 


5,096.20 




132,200 


2,194.52 




101,900 


1,691.54 




300 


4.98 




177,500 


2,946.50 




194,400 


3,227.04 




165,800 


2,752.28 




96,600 


1,603.56 




123,600 


2,051.76 




133,200 


2,211.12 




348,200 


5,780.12 




28,100 


466.46 




133,600 


2,217.76 




126,100 


2,093.26 




109,800 


1,822.68 




121,500 


,2,016.90 




242,900 


4,032.14 




123,600 


2,051.76 




89,400 


1,484.04 




129,000 


2,141.40 




87,400 


1 ,450.84 




186,900 


3,102.54 




184,600 


3,064.36 




174,500 


2,896.70 




129,500 


2, 146.38 




116,200 


1,928.92 




276,800 


4,594.88 




156,500 


:,265.90 




222,200 


3,688.52 




100,100 


1,661.66 




119,200 


1,978.72 



183 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



II int 
Flint 



Flint. 
Flint 
Flint, 
Floyd , 
Flynn : 



5 Henry R. 

Jr. § Margaret P. 



Plannery , Consl ance H . 

Flannery, Donald J. 5 Harriet E. 
Plansburgh, Earl R. S Louise H. 
Fleck, .lames D. & Margaret E. 
Ephraim B. 

Eugenia N. 
Flint, George B. £ Lucie S. 
Flint , Peter $ Janet B. 
Flint, Robert M. $ Linda C. 

Warren F. 

Edward F. 

Warren F. 

Oliver B. 

William S Therese Marie 
Foley, John F. $ Bassett, Caroline C. 
Ford, David II. & Mary Gillingham 
Foster, Gerald L. $ Candace F. 
Foster, J. Edward § Sara M. 
Fowlkes, Marion L., Exec. 
Francis, Henry A. 5 Phoebe Lee 
Frank, Robert C. & Velma S. 
Franklin, J. Thomas 5 Susan B. 
Fraser, Donald C. $ Joanne M. 
Fraser, Robert M. £ Donna A. 
Freda, Warren J. £ Priscilla L. 
Freed, Charles $ Florence W. 
French, John B. £ Deborah C. 
Friel, Patrick J. £ Charlotte A. 
Frost, Wesley T. $ October C. 
Fullerton, Albert L. Jr. § Mary S. 
Fung, Margaret 
Fusillo, Michael G. $ Concetta G. 



Gable, Bruce Kent 
Gabovitch, William 
Gagne, Lawrence E. 
Gailey, Timothy H. 
Gal litano , Alphone 
Gal litano , Leo £ A 
Gannett, Ann C. 
Gardent, Paul E. J 
Gargi 1] , Robert M. 
Garner, Robert N. 
Garrett, Pritchard 
Garrison, David L. 
Garrison, John B. 
Garside, Alice H. 
Garth, John C. & N 
Gary, Mai da E. 



& Dawn Damico 

5 Annette 

$ Dorothy Q. 

6 Mary Ellen 

L. 5 Eleanor M. 
lphonse, Trustees 

r. § Harriet V. 

f : Marion Lynn 
$ Kathleen H. 

S. £ Tracy D. 

& Alice E. 



ancy M. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Persona 1 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 133,000 


$ 2,207.80 




61,900 


1 ,027.54 




168,000 


2,788.80 




58,100 


964.46 




3,400 


56.44 




152,400 


2,529.84 




88,500 


1,469.10 




98,100 


1,628.46 




1,200 


19.92 




200,800 


3,333.28 




117,200 


1,945.52 




133,300 


2,212.78 




126,400 


2,098.24 




170,200 


2,825.32 




104,800 


1,739.68 




272,800 


4,528.48 




105,100 


1,744.66 




143,900 


2,388.74 




52,700 


874.82 




102,700 


1,704.82 




229,300 


3,806.38 




226,100 


3,753.26 




197,600 


3,280.16 




116,600 


1,935.56 




3,600 


59.76 




133,800 


2,221.08 




236,800 


3,930.88 




194,600 


3,230.36 




106,300 


1,764.58 




171,700 


2,850.22 




38,100 


632.46 




206,100 


3,421.26 




142,800 


2,370.48 




158,000 


2,622.80 




160,500 


2,664.30 




106,700 


1 ," _ 




289,500 


4,805.70 




159,100 


2,641.06 




262,100 


4,350.86 




149,000 


2,473.40 




306,100 


5,081 .26 




133,200 


2,211.12 




189,700 


3,149.02 




135,000 


2,241.00 




185,100 


3,072.66 




119,500 


1 ,983.70 




105,200 


1,746.32 




126,600 


2,101.56 



184 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Gatchell, G. Gordon Jr. § Esther A. 
Gauvin, Gregory P. § Mary Lou 
Gavrin, Edward S. 

Gebert, Anna V. § Callahan, Anne Marie 
Gechijian, Ara K. B, Nancy M. 
Gentile, Joseph F. 6 Kathleen E. 
Gerson, Nathaniel C. § Sareen R. 
Gheith, Mohamed A. § Dorothy A. 
Giese, Paul E. § Lucretia H. 

§ Josephine L. 
. $ Helen B. 



$ 90,700 $ 1,505.62 



Gilbert, John W. 
Gilfoy, Donald A 
Gillis, John G. 
Gilmore, Peter J 
Giurleo, James M 
Glass, John B. § 
Gleason, Nancy W 
Goddard, Richard B 
Golden, Sylvia H. 
Goldlust, Jerry A. 
Goodrich, John C. i 
Gordon, Lester I. I 
Gounaris, Thomas X 
Grabill. Elliott V 



§ Hilary 
& Mary C. 

Florence M 

J. 

B. $ Karen 



Susan L. 
Krouk-Gordon 
§ Jean G. 
§ Martha L. 



Dafn; 



Graddis, Richard D. 

Grady, John K. & Elizabeth S. 

Graf, Malcolm 

Grande, Orlando S. $ Rose P. 

Gras, Ranulf W. $ Annette E. 

Grason, Rufus L. & Edna B. 

Gray, Eugene & Constance D. 

Greaves, Allan W. $ Theresa D. 

Greeley, James M. & Bernice C. 

Green, Laurence H. § Margot Perkins 

Green, Robert T. & Catherine M. 

Greenberg, Sandra L. 

Greenberger, Joel S. § Martha S. 

Greene, Marvin H. 

Greer, Gordon B., Tr. , GJV Trust 

Gregg, Peter A. 

Griggs, Annette M. & Thomas I. Jr. 

Griglik, Casimir Jr. , Patrice A. & 

Regina J., Trustees 
Grim, William M. Jr. § Barbara M. 
Grinnell, William L. £ Virginia B. 
Grobleski, Timothy J. § Margaret 
Gross, Thomas A.O. & Judith C.F. 
Grover, C. Stuart & Gunilda G. 
Groves, Allan M. & Camille G. 
Guarino, Guy E. & Frances I. 
Guldberg, Peter A. 6 Alexandra B. 



137,300 
158,200 
140,600 
120,800 

90,800 
133,800 

84,600 
113,100 

55,100 
181,700 
196,000 
118,400 
5,000 
122,800 
188,500 

81,700 
122,800 

85,700 
130,700 
120,200 
126,300 
207,400 
3,200 
132,700 

70,500 
183,100 
133,000 
129,500 

70,900 
101,600 
136,700 
121,400 
230,600 
153,900 
127,800 
141,700 
160,400 
153,800 
159,900 

119,600 
102,200 
135,700 
95,000 
139,300 
121,100 
126,300 
194,900 
220,100 



2,279.18 
2,626.12 
2,333.96 
2,005.28 
1,507.28 
2,221.08 
1,404.36 
1,877.46 
914.66 
3,016.22 
3,253.60 
1,965.44 

83.00 
2,038.48 
3,129.10 
1,356.22 
2,038.48 
1,422.62 
2,169.62 
1,995.32 
2,096.58 
3,442.84 

53.12 
2,202.82 
1,170.30 
3,039.46 
2,207.80 
2,149.70 
1,176.94 
1,686.56 
2,269.22 
2,015.24 
3,827.96 
2,554.74 
2,121.48 
2,352.22 
2,662.64 
2,553.08 
2,654.34 

1,985.36 
1,696.52 
2,252.62 
1 ,577.00 
2,312.38 
2,010.26 
2,096.58 
3,235.34 
3,653.66 



185 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Gunaris, Theodore & Rheta D. 

Gurley, Elizabeth J . 

Gurski, Richard J. $ Harriett A. 

Gustafson, J. Kenneth § Janet L. 

Gustavson, Glenn 0. § Morton, Patricia A, 

Guthke, Karl S. 5 Dagmar C. 

Guy, Donald C. 6 M. Cynthia 

Guy, Will R. $ Corinne L. 

Gyftopoulos, Elias P. & Artemis E. 



H.B. Knowles, Inc. 
Haartz, Beatrice R. 
Hachikian, Kenneth V. § Gloria S. 
Hadcock, Peter W. & Mary G. 
Hadley, Henry H. & Janna P. 
Hadlock, Charles R. & Joanne T. 
Haessler, Herbert A. & Diane F. 
Hager, Michael W. $ Kerry Sawic 
Haggerty, John S. $ Mary Jo 
Haggerty, Nancy L. 
Hagmann, Otto $ Katherine 
Hagopian, Charles S Stella 
Hales, Charles A. $ Mary Ann 
Hall, Judith J. $ Newman, Grace A. 
Hall, Nancy M. 
Hamilton, Harry A. 
Hamilton, William H. £ Esther S. 
Hamilton, William L. $ Lisa P. 
Hammond, John S. & Nancy C. 
Hancock, John C. 
Hankey, Francis W. & Edna J. 
Hansen, Kent F. 

Hansen, C. Russell Jr. & Pamela W. 
Hanson, Adler M. $ Madeline A. 
Hanson, Elna P. & A. Warren 
Hapgood, Norman Jr. & Ruth K. 
Harding, Douglas B. & Susan Shelby 
Harney, Gregory G. $ Anne W. 
Haroian, Henry & Jessie S. 
Haroutunian, Harry J. $ Anita G. 
Harrington, Nancy (Mrs. Donald Forg) 
Harrington, Clifford F. Jr. $ 

Winthrop W. Jr. 
Harrington, Winthrop W. Jr. 
Harris, Melvyn H. £ Nancy M. 
Harris, Roger W. £ Evelyn A. 
Harris, Eric A., Brooks, Susan F., 

Schwarz, Joseph H. $ Johnson, 

Ra -mond A. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 74,200 


$ 1 ,231.72 




134,200 


2,227.72 




168,600 


2,798.76 




112,500 


1,867.50 




160,200 


2,659.32 




130,500 


2,166.30 




159,300 


2,644.38 




211,400 


3,509.24 




275,400 


4,571.64 




211,600 


3,512.56 




187,500 


3,112.50 




227,000 


3,768.20 




127,100 


2,109.86 




159,200 


2,642.72 




128,700 


2,136.42 




222,900 


3,700.14 




159,200 


2,642.72 




134,800 


2,237.68 




98,200 


1,630.12 




147,200 


2,443.52 




105,000 


1,^43.00 




192,600 


3,197. 16 




82,400 


1,56". 84 




99, "00 


1,655.02 




74,200 


1,251.-2 




139,200 


2,510.72 




110,900 


1,840.94 




196,200 


3,256.92 




48,700 


808.42 




171,900 


2,855.54 




244,000 


4,050.40 




113,900 


1,890.-4 




129,600 


2,151.56 




144,000 


2,390.40 




102,600 


1,703.16 




126,500 


2,099.90 




234,300 


3,889.38 




109,100 


1 ,811.06 




62,100 


1,030.86 




18,600 


308.76 




31,400 


521.24 


3,400 


5"S,700 


6,342.86 




195,000 


- ^3.80 




64,300 


1,06". 38 




168,600 


2,798.76 



186 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Harrison, Henry F. § Elizabeth H. 

Harvey, Frank L. § Adele P. 

Hatsopoulos, George N. § Daphne 

Hatsopoulos, John N. § Patricia L. 

Haughey, Sylvia M. , Extrx. 

Hawes, Donald 0. & Lillian B. 

Hawkes, Gregory A. £ Elaine P. 

Haworth, George G. § Thelma E. 

Hayes, Wilson C. & Weigent , Dana L. 

Hays, Timothy P. § Pamela M. 

Haytayan, Harry M. § Katherine J. 

Healey, Harry R. Jr. § Jeanne C. 

Healy, Edward M. & Helen T. 

Heart, Frank E. & Jane S. 

Heartt, Charlotte B. 

Hecht, Norman B. § Mary A. 

Heck, Mary Higbee 

Heijn, Cornelius Jr. § Marion 

Helburn, Peter £ Margaret 

Heller, Edmond A. Jr. § Madeline M. 

Henderson, Robert S. § Carolyn H. 

Henderson, Robert S. 

Hendrick, James G. 

Hendrickson, Robert A. § Ruth Ann 

Henebry, W. Michael § Carolyn L. 

Herlin, Melvin A. £ Eugenia T. 

Herman, Peter P. § Mary G. 

Herman, William F. 

Hersch, Charles $ Phyllis R. 

Herschbach, Dudley R. § Georgene G. 

Herthel, Evelyn S. 

Herthel , Laurence D. 

Hester, Leon B. § Mary B. 

Hewitt, Elizabeth C. § George C. 

Hibbin, George C. § Julia K. 

Hicks, Robert C. £ Sarah D. 

Higgins, William M. Ill $ Johanna 

High, James J. & Lois K. 

Hill, Audrey B. 

Hill, Craig C. & Heather D. 

Hinds, Edith C. 

Hinds, Edward H. $ Edith M. 

Hines, David J. 6 Marjorie K. 

Hingston, Joseph A. & Gloria M. 

Hirsch, Nancy L. fcj Ross, Robert A. 

Hoar, Norman W. & Shirley E. 

Hoben, Allan 6 Susan J. 

Hoch, Alfred D. 

Hoch, Reimar H.H. 

Hodgson, Nicholas P. & Melissa P. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 417,900 


$ 6,937.14 




231,900 


3,849.54 




310,400 


5,152.64 




270,800 


4,495.28 




168,100 


2,790.46 




122,400 


2,031.84 




108,200 


1,796.12 




104,900 


1,741.34 




64,000 


1,062.40 




137,900 


2,289.14 




111,900 


1,857.54 




150,800 


2,503.28 




115,300 


1,913.98 




137,800 


2,287.48 




143,500 


2,382.10 




137,000 


2,274.20 




379,100 


6,293.06 




106,200 


1,762.92 




147,000 


2,440.20 




117,000 


1,942.20 




120,000 


1,992.00 




4,700 


78.02 




144,800 


2,403.68 




96,000 


1,593.60 




187,900 


3,119.14 




177,600 


2,948. 16 




77,000 


1,278.20 




251,000 


4,166.60 




118,000 


1,958.80 




162,300 


2,694.18 




229,200 


3,804.72 


700 


179,500 


2,991.32 




182,500 


3,029.50 




145,100 


2,408.66 




207,900 


- 3,451.14 




53,500 


888.10 




62,100 


1,030.86 




132,200 


2,194.52 




118,000 


1,958.80 




234,400 


3,891.04 




98,100 


1 ,628.46 




271,400 


4,505.24 




153,200 


2,543.12 




90,500 


1 ,502.5(1 




108,700 


1 ,804.42 




137,400 


2,280.84 




114,200 


1,895.-2 




96,500 


01 .90 




85,000 


1,377.80 




112,600 


1 ,869.16 



187 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Hoi den, Sarah C. 

Holden, Sarah C. 6 Lawrence T. Jr. 

Holland, Peter A. 5 Marjorie L. 

Holland, Taffy K. 

Hoi lingsworth , Lowell M. 5 Florence S 

Hollister, Walter M. & J. Sally 

Hoover, Henry B. § Lucretia J. 

Hopengarten, Fredric J. 

Horn, Michael C. $ Helen C. 

Home, Benjamin § Jean Y. 

Horwitz, Murray $ Patricia F. 

Hosey, John E. § Margaret L. 

Houghton, Lillian 5 Est. of John 



Ruth B. 
Sally E. 



& Berg-Hubbard 



Housman, Frank M. 

Howard, Joseph W. 

Howland, Faith 

Hsu, Michael Shih $ Dora Wu 

Hubbard, Eliot 

Hubbard, William T. 

Patti J. 
Humez, David 
Hunsaker, Jerome C. 
Hunt, Merrill T. 

Hunter, William Bruce 5 Suzanne I 
Hurd, Faye K. § Kenneth E. 
Hurd, Joseph F. $ Nellie 
Hurd, Kenneth E. $ Faye K. 
Hurff, Joseph L. $ Elizabeth C. 
Hutchinson, James A. 
Hyde, Benjamin D. § Mildred B. 



Ide, Kenton J. & Christel 
lliescu, Nicholas 6 Esther 
Immel, Stephen G. & Peggy L. 
Ingard, K. Uno & Doris C. 
Ireland, Christopher & Helen 
Irwin, Mary M. 

Ives, S. William 6 Katherine 
Ives, Cecilia Van Hollen 



Jackson, Gardner Jr. & Sallie 
Jackson, Huson & Polly F. 
Jagger, James M. £ Miriam H. 
James, Hamilton R. & Waleska E. 
Janes, G. Sargent & Ann B. 
Jarvis, John W. $ Elaine C. 
Jayson , Patricia A. 
Jeffrey, Joseph H. & Louise A. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 353,800 


$ 5,873.08 




89,800 


1 ,490.68 




110,700 


1 ,837.62 




125,100 


2,076.66 




173,300 


2,876.78 




120,500 


2,000.30 




147,400 


2,446.84 




103,400 


1,716.44 




194,500 


3,228.70 




191,000 


3,170.60 




160,300 


2,660.98 




81,100 


1,346.26 




57,000 


946.20 




205,100 


3,404.66 




143,700 


2,385.42 




87,300 


1 ,449.18 




199,300 


3,308.38 




196,400 


5,260.24 




95,000 


1,577.00 




485,300 


8,055.98 




282,500 


4,689.50 




99,800 


1,656.68 




132,100 


2,192.86 




61,100 


1 ,014.26 




187,700 


3,115.82 




143,000 


2,573.80 




123,700 


2,053.42 




99,100 


1 ,645.06 




161,900 


2,687.54 




85,900 


1,425.94 




128,900 


2,139.74 




163,700 


2,-17.42 




14", 500 


13.50 




112,700 


1,870.82 




191,800 


5,183.88 




194,700 


5,232.02 




16", 200 


"5.52 




124,400 


2,065.04 




218,000 


5,618.80 




132,300 


2,196.18 




.600 


6,766.16 




158,200 


-4.12 




146,500 


51.90 




98,200 


1,650.12 




104,600 


1 ."36.36 



188 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Jenal, Robert L. & Irene D. 
Jenney, Charles J. £ Katrina C. 
Jennings, Charles E. § Ann V. 
Jensen, Holgar J. £ Grace A. 
Jerodel Realty Trust 
Jevon, Robert W. § Virginia B. 
Jewett, Julie Davis 
John, Dewitt $ Morley M. 
Johnson, Ernest L. 
Johnson, Ernest L. § Grace M. 
Johnson, H.W. & M. Jeannine 
Johnson, Kenneth A. § Gladys 
Johnson, Richard A. § Donna L. 
Johnston, David 0. 



Kahn, Martin H. £ Susan B. 

Kalaidjian, W. Gerrie & Wray, Eunice C, 

Kalajian, Michael H. Jr. £ Seta E. 

Kalba, Konrad K. & Patricia A. 

Kameny, Stuart M. $ Wendy W. 

Kanarek, Stephen D. & Roberta F. 

Kano, Cyrus H. § Dorothy 

Kao, Peter S. & Mei-Lin 

Karassik, Peter T. S Nancy 

Kasparian, Karl D. S Carol 0. 

Kass , Edward H. £ Amalie M. 

Kassner, Michael A. § Patricia A. 

Katz, Saul L. $ Dorothy 

Kaufman, Marcia W. (Mrs. Josephson) 

Kaufman, Miriam H. 

Kaupe, Walter 

Kaye, Harold £ Alice S. 

Keay, Donald P. & Mary Ann L. 

Keevil, Charles S. Jr. 

Keevil, Charles S. Jr. & Hannah M. 

Keily, Delbar P. & Gertrude E. 

Kelleher, Robert J. k Katherine J. 

Kelleher, Thomas E. 

Kelley, Andrew J. $ Irene N. 

Kellner, Joan (Mrs. Lundberg) 

Kelly, Thomas W. $ Mary A. 

Kennard, Henrietta W. 

Kennedy, Albert E. 

Kennedy, John P. $ Sylvia 

Kennedy Land Corp. 

Kenney, Thomas F. $ Linda 

Kerrebrock, Jack L. S Bernice M. 

Kershaw, Thomas M. & Elizabeth M. 

Kessel, Joseph B. $ Lesley J . 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 178,400 


$ 2,961.44 




119,400 


1,982.04 




132,200 


2,194.52 




90,200 


1,497.32 




264,200 


4,385.72 




150,200 


2,493.32 




171,100 


2,840.26 




176,300 


2,926.58 




160,300 


2,660.98 




188,700 


3,132.42 




183,200 


3,041.12 




131,100 


2,176.26 




124,300 


2,063.38 




154,300 


2,561.38 




217,900 


3,617.14 




116,400 


1,932.24 




197,200 


3,273.52 




86,600 


1,437.56 




162,900 


2,704.14 




116,200 


1,928.92 




112,100 


1,860.86 




228,600 


5,794.76 




205,700 


3,414.62 




240,900 


3,998.94 




301,700 


5,008.22 




125,500 


2,083.30 




163,500 


2,714.10 




171,700 


2,850.22 




140,100 


2,325.66 




173,400 


2,878.44 




104,900 


1,741.34 




134,500 


2,232.70 


4,200 




69.72 




171,600 


2,848.56 




64,000 


1,062.40 




142,900 


2,372.14 




60,500 


1,004.30 




143,900 


2,388.74 




76,200 


1,264.92 




140,000 


2,324.00 




165,300 


2,743.98 




3,600 


59.76 




155,700 


2,584.62 




300,700 


4,991.62 




289,900 


4,812.34 




182,600 


3,031.16 




191,300 


3,175.58 




122,200 


2,028.52 



189 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Ketteringham, John M. 5 Susan M. 

Keyes , Janet T. 

Kim, Changsoo 6 Young j a Lee 

Kimball, Joan C.F. g John R. 

Kimnach, Robert B. S Betty F. 

Kindleberger, Charles P. § Sarah M, 

King, Eleanor T. 

King, William A. 5 Elizabeth P. 

Kingsbury, Howard T. $ Ellen W. 

Kirby, Gerard L. 

Kirkpatrick, Margaret M. 

Kistiakowsky , Irma E. 

Kitses, Steven J. 5 Mary H. 

Kj el lander , Mary C . 

Klem, Christopher £ Susan M. 

Kling, John W. & Louise H. 



Klobuchar, John A. 
Klotz, Robert E. & 
Knox, Wendell J. & 
Koehler, Edward F. 



& N. Maribeth 
Joan L. 

Algere-Knox, Lucile 
& Margaret M. 



Kolbin, Lawrence £ Rebecca H. 

Kolodny, Myer Z. 5 M. Lillian 

Kopp, Jay F. § Marilyn J. 

Korhonen, Miriam 

Kornfeld, George R. 5 Hulen S. 

Koumantzelis , Arthur G. & Vaia 

Kruse, Jurgen M. & Alice S. 

Kubik, James C. § Elizabeth B. 

Kuhns , Roger J . & 

Kuhns-Dimancescu, 

Kulka, J. Peter 

Kumar, Anil 

Kurzina, Peter S. 

Kwasniak , Wa Iter F 



Roberta B 
Katherine 



& Stephanie 



Lackner-Graybiel , James R. $ Ann M. 
Ladjevardi, Habib & Golnaz Amin 
Lahey, Heirs of James 
Lahnstein, Richard K. 
Lancaster, John M.W. § Robin A.W. 
Landry, Christopher K. & G. Barrie 
Lane, J. Frank $ Kathleen F. 
Lang, Richard E. & Betty Lee 
Langton. William G. & Jane G. 
Lankhorst, Beverly 
Lathrop, Scott A. 6 Beatrice T. 
Laurence, Kenneth § Lynda Wilson 
Lavrakas, Apostle & Fofo 
Lawrence, Michael W. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 132,000 


$ 2,191.20 




103,400 


1,716.44 




210,900 


3,500.94 




138,200 


2,294.12 




120,300 


1,996.98 




115,700 


1 ,920.62 




151,900 


2,521.54 




100,300 


1,664.98 




157,300 


2,611.18 




92,600 


1,537.16 




161,400 


2,679.24 




196,400 


3,260.24 




151,000 


2,506.60 




137,000 


2,274.20 




142,100 


2,358.86 




110,400 


1,832.64 




127,400 


2,114.84 




153,300 


2,544.-8 




130,000 


2,158.00 




123,400 


2,048.44 




174,200 


2, 891. 72 




123,000 


2,041.80 




116,400 


1,952.24 




108,000 


1 ,"92.80 




109,100 


1,811.06 




265,200 


4,402.32 




101,000 


1 ,676.60 




129,000 


2,141.40 




199,200 


3,306.72 




204,600 


3,396.36 




"6,700 


1.27 




149,200 


- _ 6. - 2 




111 ,300 


1,847.58 




119,300 


1,980.38 




134,400 


2,231.04 




282,200 


4,684.52 




39,000 






81,200 


1,54". 92 




86,300 


1,432.58 




265,900 


1.-13.94 




209,000 


3,469.40 




184,900 


3,<X 




169,800 


2,818.68 




104,900 


♦1.34 




161,600 


2.682.56 




107,000 


776.20 




41,400 


687.24 




115,100 


1,910.66 



190 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Lawson, Harold E. § Wanda E. 

Lawson, John R. 

Lay, Kenneth W. £ Virginia A. 

Lazaridis , Lazarus J. § Suzanne 

Leape, Martha P. 

Leary, John F. Jr., John F. § Mona R, 

Leathern', Evelyn K. 

Leaver, Barbara S. 

Lee, John D. 

Lee, John D. § Lee B. 

Lee, Kenneth R. $ Marcia E. 

Lee, Richard S. 

Lee, Richard S. § Gump, Josephine K. 

Lee, Shih Ying § Lena Y. 

Lee, Thomas H. § Barbara F. 

LeGates , John C . 

Leger, Mary E. , Trustee 

Leggat, Thomas E. § Barbara B. 

Leinwand, Charles M. 

Lemander, William C. § Emily K. 

Lemire, Robert A. § Virginia A. 

Lenington, Robert L. § Carolyn J. 

Lennon, James V. § Rushby, Kathy A. 

Lennon, Stephen D. § Grace 

Leonard, S. Edward § Marilyn J. 

Leong, Joseph C. § Szeto, Suzanna 

Leshick, Joseph J. § Margaret F. 

Leslie, Paul M. £ Elizabeth M. 

Levey, Harold A. Jr. § Ruth P. 

Levin, Alvin $ Betty 

Levy, Morris S. .§ Wendy W. 

Lewis, Marion S. Trust 

Li, Yao T. § Nancy T. 

Liberman, James B. £ Ellen D. 

Liddick, Harold S. § Virginia D. 

Liepins, Atis A. 5 Diana 

Light, Galen D. $ Lois McClure 

Lincoln Beauty Salon 

Lincoln Crossing Restaurant 

Lincoln Homes Corp. 

Lincoln Old Town Hall Corp. 

Lincoln Plumbing § Heating Co. 



Lindsay, Franklin 
Lingos, John G. 
Linnell, Zenos M. 
Linstrom, Peter J 
Lippman, Anne F. I 
Litte, Rudolph 
Little, John D.C. 
Littlefield, Paul 



A. 5 Margot C. 

& Geraldine 
& Maybelle L. 
Richard J. , Trs. 

$ Elizabeth A. 
D. $ Emmy N. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 20,400 


$ 358.64 




12,600 


209.16 




165,600 


2,748.96 




157,700 


2,617.82 




160,700 


2,667.62 




28,000 


464.80 




15,800 


262.28 




155,900 


2,587.94 


2,500 




41.50 




111,500 


1,850.90 




143,300 


2,378.78 




102,300 


1,698.18 




242,400 


4,023.84 




272,700 


4,526.82 




183,300.. 


3,042.78 




172,000 


2,855.20 




76,400 


1,268.24 




195,700 


3,248.62 




132,400 


2,197.84 




149,500 


2,481.70 




136,600 


2,267.56 




131,300 


2,179.58 




94,000 


1,560.40 




107,800 


1,789.48 




104,700 


1,738.02 




82,100 


1,362.86 




132,800 


2,204.48 




60,700 


1,007.62 




107,200 


1 ,779.52 




147,000 


2,440.20 




95,900 


1,591.94 




176,300 


2,926.58 




180,000 


2,988.00 




103,800 


J, 723. 08 




110,000 


1,826.00 




149,900 


2,488.34 




104,400 


1,733.04 


2,500 




41.50 


1,200 




19.92 




4,686,000 


"-,"87.60 




42,700 


708.82 


800 




13.28 




251,200 


4,169.92 




131,300 


2,179.58 




142, "00 


2,568.82 




94,900 


1 ,57 




110,900 


1,840.94 




134, -(H) 


2,236.02 




153,000 


2,539 .80 




140,900 


2 ,358.94 



191 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Livermore, Robert Jr. & Isabel K. 

Lloyd, Donald B. f, Martha A. 

Lo, Steven S. $ Yi-Chao M. 

Lockwood, Dunbar Jr. $ Irene P. 

Loewenstein, Davida G. 

Loewenstein, Paul $ Sophie 

Long, Leslie B. $ Cathryn Cherne 

Loud, John F. $ Mary L. 

Loud, Robert L. $ Gwyneth E. 

Loughlin, Leona K. 

Love, John C. S Peabody , Susan W. 

Lovering, Talbot D. § Emily B. 

Low, Stephen R. $ Barbara B. 

Ludden, John M. $ Susan F. 

Luft, Ludwig $ Anne-Dore 

Luse, Alan J. 

Lustwerk, Ferdinand $ Ingeborg Johanne 

Lutnicki, Harriet H. 

Lutnicki, Victor A. 5 Harriet H. 

Lyons , Joyce W. 

Lytle, William 0. Jr. 



MacDonald, Winslow H. £ June R. 

Machen, William F. $ Christine P 

Maclnnis, Hazel A. 

Mackenzie, Ethel L. 

Mackenzie, Murdock J. 

MacLaughlin, Robert S 

Maclaurin, Elfriede C 

Maclaurin, Ellen (Mrs 

MacLean, H. Arnold £ Corinne C. 

MacLeod, George A. & Elizabeth M. 

MacLeod, Josephine F. 

MacLeod, Edward Jr. & Mary M. 

MacMahon, D'Arcy G. & Lucia T. 

MacMahon, H. Edward £ Marion Ross 

MacNeil, Bruce M. 

MacNeil, Ronald L 

Mahan, Russell P. 

Mahoney, George 

Mahoney, Gerald J 

Mahoney, John D. $ Eleanor D 

Maier, Emanuel & Sylvia 

Mail let, Joseph L. , Tr. 

Malihi, Ali, Trustee 

Mai kin, James M. 

Malloy, David C. 

Malloy, Matthew J. & lone W. 

Malloy, Robert M. 



$ Adeline A. 
6 Patricia E. 

Roger Pierce) 



{j Wendy Snyder 
§ Anastasia W. 

5 Jeanne M. 



Aggregate 


Aggr< 


on 


Value of 


V.-i lu 


: and 


ma l 


Real 




Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 144,500 


$ 2,398.70 




150,700 


2,501 .62 




90,600 


1,51 




221,800 


3,681.88 




132,300 


2,196.18 




143,100 


2,375.46, 




122,900 


2,040.14 




197,400 


3,276.84 




93,300 


1,548.78 




70,500 


1,170.30 




129,900 


2,156.34 




111,400 


1,849.24 




149,900 


2,488.34 




133,300 


2,212.78 




126,500 


2,099.90 




69,600 


1,155.36 




132,400 


2,197.84 




9,000 


149.40 




224,000 


3,718.40 




107,600 


1,786.16 




116,000 


1,925.60 




137,900 


2,289.14 




197,000 


3,270.20 




84,900 


1,409.34 




139,900 


2,322.34 




94,000 


1,560.40 




113,800 


1 ,889.08 




185,200 


3,074.32 




162,100 


2,690.86 




127,300 


2,113.18 




80,100 


1,329.66 




85,700 


1,422.62 




58,000 


962.80 




256,200 


4,252.92 




104,400 


1,733.04 




148,000 


2,456.80 




78,400 


1,301.44 




236,800 


3,930.88 




99,800 


1,656.68 




102,700 


1,704.82 




170,800 


2,835.28 




179,600 


2,981.36 




364,100 


6,044.06 




95,000 


1,57". 00 




138,100 


2,292.46 




64,800 


1,075.68 




10,200 


169.32 




90,000 


1 ,494.00 



192 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Malloy, Robert M. Jr. § Carol E. 

Malloy, Robert M. Jr. $ David C. 

Malloy, Terese A. 

Maloney, Richard G., Trustee 

Maloney, Bernard C. § Janet L. 

Mancib, Richard A. £ Jacquelyn H. 

Mannar ino, Joseph § Florence A. 

Manning, Catherine L. 

Mansfield, James S. § Sarah C. 

Mansfield, Richard C, Mary C, 
Frederick L. § Joan F. 

Manzelli, Donald M. £ Janet G. 

Manzelli, John § Dorothy 

Mar, James W. § Edith 

Maranian, Arthur A. Sr. § Helen 

Marcks , Ronald H. § Barbara W. 

Marcus, Fred § Patricia A. 

Marier, Bruce E. § Suzanne Burr 

Maroni , Jacques R. , Kevin J. $ Jaman M, 

Marr, W. Allen Jr. 

Marsh, Paul E. § Margaret B. 

Martin, Robert T. § Margaret M. 

Martini, William F. § Virginia J. 

Mason, Betty 

Mason, Richard K. § Ann E. 

Mason, William C. $ Virginia 

Massachusetts Audubon Society 

Massachusetts Centers Inc. 

Massachusetts Port Authority 

Masters, Joseph I. § Nathan, Toby 

Mathur, Dilip K. £ Estelle R. 

Mattes, Sara A. § Ritz, Jerome 

Maurer, David L. d, Marks, Joyce 

Maus, Pamela J. $ Owen, R. Calvin Jr. 

Maxwell, Phyllis B. 

May, Doris Hudson 

May, James W. Jr. § Linda C. 

Mayfield, Glover B. f 7 Gale S. 

Mayo, Stephen K. $ Post, Marda A. 

McArdle, Lois $ Pettee, James L. 

McClain, David S. 

McClennen, Alan £ Louise H. 

McColl, Archibald M.S. 

McCune, W. Joseph § Sanders, Georgiana 

McCune, William J. § Elisabeth J. 

McCurdy, Michael C. § Deborah Lamb 

McDougald, Ronald J. $ Kathleen W. 

McDougald, Ronald J. § Kathleen W., 
Caswell, John R. § Carol B., 
Zimmerman, R.M. $ Zock, R.M., Trs . 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 92,200 


$ 1,530.52 




10,200 


169.32 




100,600 


1,669.96 




304,200 


5,049.72 




170,200 


2,825.32 




127,200 


2,111.52 




77,400 


1,284.84 




78,100 


1,296.46 




143,800 


2,387.08 




206,000 


3,419.60 




214,500 


3,560.70 




87,500 


1,452.50 




103,600 


1,719.76 




184,400 


3,061.04 




164,700 


2,734.02 




102,700 


1,704.82 




172,200 


2,858.52 




185,700 


3,082.62 




153,900 


2,554.74 




216,100 


3,587.26 




119,100 


1,977.06 




123,400 


2,048.44 




111,800 


1,855.88 




95,000 


1,577.00 




179,000 


2,971.40 




229,800 


3,814.68 




1,506,600 


25,009.56 




576,600 


9,571.56 




194,200 


3,223.72 




109,100 


1,811.06 




140,100 


2,325.66 




77,900 


1,293.14 




65,800 


, 1,092.28 




147,300 


2,445.18 




152,400 


2,529.84 




311,200 


5,165.92 




167,900 


2,787.14 




134,600 


2,234.36 




155,000 


2,573.00 




115,400 


1,915.64 




187,000 


3,104.20 




94,600 


1,570.36 




152,800 


2,536.48 




507,300 


8,421.18 




114,300 


1,897.38 




188,000 


3,120.80 



5 . TOO 



94.62 



193 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



5 Katherine S. 
Joan M. 



McGarry, Kathleen D. 

McGettigan, John T. $ Marika 

McHugh, John E. 

McHugh, James F. Ill 

Mclnnis, Donald G. $ 

McKennan, Alice W. 

McKnight , David B. 

McKnight, David B. $ Eleanor J. 

McKnight , Ernest T. , Ex. 

McLellan, John W. $ Julia C. 

McMahon, Howard & Lucille N. 

McMorrow, Maureen C. § Richard H. Jr. 

McWade, Paul E. & Lucille C. 

Mead, Varnum R. 5 Janice H. 

Mead, Varnum R. $ Thacher, Ralph, Trs 

Meade, Edmund J. 5 Eleanor H. 

Mecsas, Michael E. & Mary J. 

Meeks, M. Littleton S Louise V. 

Meenan, Marion Morey 

Melanson, Leonard J. 5 Mary 

Men i no, Mary M. 

Meriam, Alice G. & Est. of Richard S. 

Meriam, Ellin F. 

Merrill, Vincent N 

Messina, Elena C. 

Messina, Mauro J 

Messina, Jaspare § Grazia 

Meyer, Eugene B. & Melissa S. 

Meyer, Richard F. 

Michener, Susanah H. 

Milender, Sumner N. $ Edith M. 

Millard, Donald A. $ Jeannette D. 

Millard, Susan 6 David K. 

Millard, Donald A. Jr. f T Catherine C 

Miller, Albert A. 6 Brouwer, Sibyl 

Miller, Harold T. 6 Marcheta 

Miller, Joseph C. & Ruth S. 

Mills, Rodney S. $ Marie F.A. 

Mintz, N'orbett L. & Sophie B. 

Mix, Thomas R. $ Helen 

Mixon, Scott I. & Isabel 

Mlavsky, Abraham I. & Sally A. 

Mohr, John J. $ Jean F. 

Mo Her. C/nthia 

Montgomery, Maurice M. Jr. 6 Florence V 

Moor, Edgar J. 6 Joan R. 

Moore, Paul 

Moore, Robert L. & Dorothy H. 

Moore, Murvale H. Jr. & Negarre Hestmut 

Moran, J. David & Coakley, Robert J. 



& Anne A. 
6 Mary C. 



A. 



L. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 146,000 


$ 2,423.60 




145,300 


2,411.98 




109,500 


1,817.70 




172,200 


2,858.52 




48,200 


800.12 




121,300 


2,013.58 




31,200 


517.92 




89,600 


1,487.36 




85,700 


1,422.62 




67,900 


1,127. 14 




348,300 


5,781.78 




231,800 


3,847.88 




159,100 


2,641.06 




146,200 


2,426.92 




101,400 


1,683.24 




152,500 


2,531.50 




144,400 


2,397.04 




168,400 


\)5.44 




180,500 


2,996.30 




72,400 


1,201.84 




88,500 


1 ,469.10 




56,500 


605.90 




94,700 


1 ,5~2. 02 




101,900 


1,691.54 




248,500 


4,125. 10 




145,000 


2,3^3.80 




95,700 


1 ,588.62 




258,400 


4,289.44 




9,900 


164.34 




70,600 


1,171.96 




218,200 


3,e. 




222,700 


3,696.82 




246,500 


4,091.90 




241,600 


4,010.56 




153,200 


:3. 12 




185,700 


3,082.62 




183,000 


3,05". 80 




160,800 


2,669.28 




184,100 


3,056.06 




132,800 


2,204.48 




128,300 


2 ,129.-8 




205,000 


3,403.00 




308,200 


5,116.12 




85,800 


1,391.08 




101,600 


1 ,686.56 




194,100 


_;:.06 




200 


5.52 




126,600 


2,101.56 




148,000 


"6.80 




150,000 


■r'0.00 



194 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Morency, Mary V. § Alfred J. 
Morette, Walter J. $ Gertrude L. 
Morey, Kenneth $ Ruth I. 
Morgan, Henry M. § Gwen G. 
Morgan, Robert G. Ill § Marcia E, 
Morganti, Victor M. § Helga 
Moririo, Luigi § Roche, Nancy J. 
Morris, Beatrice M. 
Morris, Lloyd § Katherine 
Morrissey, J. Neil § Mary F. 
Morse, Thomas R. 



Morse, 


, William H 


. § Patricia A. 


Morser, Calvin S 




Morton, Peter W. 


& Judy W. 


Mosher, David B. 


$ Claire B. 


Mosher, David B. 


S Schliemann, Peter, Trs 


Mosher, David B. 


$ Claire B. , £ 


Schliemann, Peter § Diane 


Moss, 


Karen M. 




Moss, 


Leonard G. 


§ Frances S. 


Moss, 


Rodney E. 


§ Elizabeth T. 


Moss, 


Sidney § S 


ilke V. 


Moss, 


Sidney 




Mount , 


, Wayne D . 


5 Claire L. 


Mozzi , 


, Robert L. 


S Ruth M. 



Mrakovich, David V. $ Gertrude A. 
Mrugala, Anthony J. 
Mrugala, Frances T. 
Mudge, Jeffrey M. £ Seim, Christine 
Mueller, Robert K. $ Jane K. 
Mukitarian, Samuel £ Stephanie 
Mulcahy, Douglas J. § Ferris, Beverly T, 
Munroe, William C. Jr. § Mary W. 
Murphy, Bartholomew £ Silverstein, Sara 
Murphy, Daniel J. $ Louise C. 
Murphy, Edward W. & Marjorie A. 
Murphy , Mary B . 
Murphy, Persis S. 
Murphy, Ruth M. 

Murphy, William J. Jr. § H. Louise 
Murphy, Mina Dorothea 
Mutschler, Louis H. f, Phyllis 
Myers, John A. Jr. § Lucy B. 
Mygatt, Samuel G. S Hall, Susan M. 
Myles, Theresa Anne $ J. Richard 
Myrabo, Leik $ Eckes-Myrabo , Christie 
Lee 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 184,000 


$ 3,054.40 




126,600 


2,101.56 




73,100 


1,213.46 




204,100 


3,388.06 




156,900 


2,604.54 




213,500 


3,544.10 




73,900 


1,226.74 




37,700 


625.82 




117,300 


1,947.18 




94,900 


1,575.34 




175,900 


2,919.94 




260,200 


4,319.32 




122,600 


2,035.16 




158,000 


2,622.80 




85,000 


1,411.00 




52,700 


874.82 




428,500 


7,113.10 




144,900 


2,405.34 




113,400 


1,882.44 




154,700 


2,568.02 




138,500 


2,299.10 




5,100 


84.66 




134,300 


2,229.38 




153,100 


2,541.46 




135,900 


2,255.94 




84,500 


1,402.70 




15,300 


253.98 




103,600 


1,719.76 




236,600 


3,927.56 




81,800 


1,357.88 




90,700 


1,505.62 




113,800 


1,889.08 




104,900 


1 ,741.34 




65,800 


1 ,092.28 




104,000 


1,726.40 




96,500 


1 ,601.90 




83,100 


1,3"9.46 




184,800 


3,067.68 




200 


3.32 




77,200 


1,281 .52 




145,900 


2,421 .94 




121 ,700 


: ,020.22 




114,000 


$92.40 




156,800 


2,60 




111,100 


1,844 26 



195 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Nabi h , Isma i 1 

Nadolski , Thomas w. 

Naiman, Mark L. § Adeline L. 

Najarian, George 

Najjar, Edward G. 5 Gail T. 

Nardone, Nancy E. 

Narod, Joel Barry 

Natwig, David L. § Monica E. 

Nawoichik, Elsie W., Admin. 

Neher, Harry P. Jr. § Alice P. 

Neiley, Alexander H. $ Diana B. 

Neily, Clark M. $ Diane D. 

Nelson, Albert E. & Marjorie E. 

Nelson, Jean R. (Mrs. Robert Parsons) 

Ness en, E. Richard 

Nesto, Bruno Richard 

Neumann, Ernest P. & Sylvia B. 

New England Tel. § Tel. Co. 

Newbold, Thomas 

Newcombe, Charles A. § Lawrence S. 

Newcombe, Lawrence S. 

Newell , Lena M. 

Newman, Daisy 

Newman, Robert B 

Newton, George C 

Newton, Harland 

Nicholson, Kathryn M. 

Nickerson, Bruce H. 

Nicherson, Elizabeth Perkins 

Nicolaides, Paris 5 Aliki 

Niles, Robert L. & Virginia M. 

Nisbet, Ian C.T. $ Shirley 

Nockles, William A. § Diane F. 

Nopakun, Suvitya $ Apilaj 

Norling, Robert A. & Jean 

Noss, George M. £ Milicent E. 

Nunes , Geoffrey £ Clare H. 



Oak, Ingul Ivan & Setsuko S. 

Oak Meadow Corp. 

O'Brien, Daniel F. & Mary T. 

O'Brien, John H. 6 Barbara M. 

O'Brien, John H. 

O'Brien, Joseph A. £ Virginia B 

O'Connor, John T. 

O'Connor, John T. & Maud D. 

Ogden, David 

i e , Gordon H. 
Ohl, Robert C. & Irina 



$ Mary Shaw 
Jr. & Suzanne R 
§ Ethel A. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 187,200 


$ 3,107.52 




112,400 


1,865.84 




107,000 


1,776.20 




195,800 


3,250.28 




185,500 


3,079.30 




177,700 


2,949.82 




97,400 


1,616.84 




94,900 


1,575.34 




181,400 


3,011.24 




160,800 


2,669.28 




136,200 


2,260.92 




89,700 


1,489.02 




108,500 


1 ,801.10 




153,800 


2,553.08 




175,300 


2,909.98 




800 


13.28 




199,800 


3,316.68 


1,712,600 




28,429.16 




203,300 


3,374.78 




140,000 


2,324.00 




69,400 


1,152.04 




75,700 


1,256.62 




90,400 


1,500.64 




442,000 


7,337.20 




134,600 


2,234.36 




121,300 


2,013.58 




221,000 


3,668.60 




96,800 


1,606.88 




203,400 


3,376.44 




253,100 


4,201.46 




141,200 


2,343.92 




105,900 


1,757.94 




81,900 


1,359.54 




181,500 


3,012.90 




129,900 


2,156.34 




114,300 


1,897.38 




232,000 


3,851.20 




133,300 


2,212.78 




842,300 


13,982.18 




96,200 


1,596.92 




139,000 


2,307.40 




58,600 


9 r 2.76 




114,000 


1 ,892.40 


2,500 




41.50 




145,400 


2,413.64 




186,000 


3,087.60 




120,600 


2,001.96 




88,000 


1,460.80 



196 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Okin, Robert L. $ Susan Moller 

Old County Realty Trust 

Olivieri, James £ Dorothy M. 

O'Loughlin, John M. § Joanne R. 

Olsen, Kenneth H. £ Elva-Liisa Aulikki 

Olshansky, Kenneth J. 

O'Neil, David 

O'Neill, Edward J. & Teresa 

Onigman, Marc P. $ Maureen 

Order of Saint Anne 

O'Rourke, Paul K. $ Marilyn J. 

Osborne, Gordon 

Out ten, Nancy K. , Trustee 

Overly, Antoinette, Trustee 

Owen, Charles J. § Mary Lee 



Paddock, Ann E. & Kelley, Penny P. 
Paddock, James L. § Uga B. 
Page, Elliott F. & Emily R. 
Page, Lot B. § Patricia H. 
Page, Stanley W. § Elisabeth H. 
Page, Walter H. Jr. § Susan F. 
Paglierani, Lawrence A. $ Pamela P, 
Paine, Jason C. 
Paine, Thomas M. § Lynda S. 
Palmer, Attelio A. § Kathryne 
Panetta, Frank § James 
Panetta, Frank § Theresa J. 
Panetta, James J. § Rosemary D. 
Panetta, Mary N. 
Panetta, Salvatore 
Pantazelos, Peter G. § Hytho H. 
Pappas, Lillian 



IV § Ann T. 

. & Jacqueline S 

& Mary B . 
§ Ruth B. 



Pareek, Purna N. 

Parke, Nathan G. 

Parker, Jackson 

Parla, John J. 

Parsons , David W 

Pastoriza, James J. 

Paul, Louise C. 

Payne, Doris K. 

Payne, H. Morse & Helen M. 

Payne, Roger S. 

Payne, Roger S. & Katherine B. 

Payne, William T. g Mary H. 

Pearmain, W. Robert & Claire P. 

Peavy, Leopold Jr. & Elizabeth J 

Peirce, Isabel T. 

Peloquin, Roy J . 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 356,800 


$ 5,922.88 




390,700 


6,845.62 




70,800 


1,175.28 




130,600 


2,167.96 




276,400 


4,588.24 




103,800 


1,723.08 




62,900 


1,044.14 




137,600 


2,284.16 




81,600 


1,354.56 




69,900 


1,160.34 




151,200 


2,509.92 




260,500 


4,324.30 




120,700 


2,003.62 




206,000 


3,419.60 




108,200 


1,796.12 




88,700 


1,472.42 




194,700 


3,232.02 




101,900 


1,691.54 




170,100 


2,823.66 




83,100 


1,379.46 




184,100 


3,056.06 




136,700 


2,269.22 




1,800 


29.88 




160,600 


2,665.96 




89,000 


1,477.40 




12,700 


210.82 




109,400 


1,816.04 




81,400 


1,351.24 




91,700 


1,522.22 




73,600 


1,221.76 




220,800 


3,665.28 


1,200 




19.92 




46,500 


771.90 




171,800 


2,851.88 




126,600 


2,101.56 




200,800 


3,333.28 




168,800 


2,802.08 




214,100 


3,554.06 




91,800 


1,523.88 




156,700 


2,601.22 




117,000 


1,942.20 




1,700 


28.22 




121,500 


2,016.90 




179,100 


2,973.06 




159,400 


2,646.04 




264,700 


4,394.02 




119,200 


1,978.72 




75,300 


1,249.98 



197 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Perch, Alvin 

Perera, Guido R. Jr. $ Joan Hulme 

Perlman, Samuel S. £ Marjorie E. 

Perry, A. Wade S Rachel 

Perry, John R. 5 Marilyn H. 

Perry, John Curtis $ Hollis, Sarah 

Perry, Richard C. 5 Nancy G. 

Pertzoff, Olga 

Peterson, Frank W. & Mary E. 

Peterson, James K. $ Nanette K. 

Peterson, Mary E. 

Pettigrew, Valerie D. 

Pezeshgpour, K. Ladjevardi 

Phelps, Elaine B. 

Phelps, Robert H. & Elizabeth K. 

Phelps-Braun , Diane K. 

Phillips, Charlotte T. 

Phinney, Jean R. 

Pho, Johnny C. 6 Ada 

Pianka, Walter E. $ Ann C. 

Piccinini , Helen M. 

Pickett, Robert C-. 5 Annette M. 

Pickman, Anthony 5 Alice L. 

Pierce, Charles Eliot & Dora Redway 

Pike, John A. & Mary S. 



Pikl, Gerolf M.S 
Pingeon, James R 
Pino, Frank J. 
Pinto, Robert W. 
Pippen, Judith 
Plant, Paul R. & 
Plouffe, Francis 
Plukas, John M. & 
Podsen, Robert E. 
Postel, Sholem 
Poulos, Charles L 
Powers , Martin J . 
Powers, Francis L 
Powning, Carolyn W. 
Pratt , Nancy A. 
Preston, Jean W. 
Privitera, Salvatore 
Protopapa, Sejfi 
Przbylski , John L . 
Puffer, Richard F 
Pugh , Alexnader L 
Pullo, Pamela B. 



Barbara 



& Clare E. 

Madeline Leonard 
A. 5 Gerene S. 

deLone, Anne M. 

& Doris A. 

& Sophie 
& Diana L. 
$ Helen E. 



S. £ Doris S. 



Jr. 
Ill 



5 Margaret 

6 Julia S. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 59,000 


$ 979.40 




259,800 


4,312.68 




336,600 


5,587.56 




237,500 


3,942.50 




127,100 


2,109.86 




166,800 


2,768.88 




177,900 


2,953.14 




335,900 


5,575.94 




114,800 


1 ,905.68 




320,600 


5,321.96 




36,100 


599.26 




153,300 


2,544.78 




137,000 


2,274.20 




138,300 


2,295.78 




139,800 


2,320.68 




172,200 


2,858.52 




233,200 


3,871. 12 




119,800 


1,988.68 




227,200 


3,771.52 




143,400 


2,380.44 




140,200 


2,327.32 




167,500 


2,780.50 




307,700 


5,107.82 




132,400 


2,197.84 




249,100 


4,135.06 




178,200 


2,958.12 




9", "00 


1,621.82 




95,000 


1,577.00 




162,900 


2,704.14 




75,600 


1 ,254.96 




130,900 


2,172.94 




105,700 


1,721.42 




220,700 


5,663.62 




197,200 


3,2~5. 52 




95,100 


1.578.66 




123,300 


2,046.78 




"4,300 


1,235.38 




"5,200 


1,215.12 




149,200 


2,476.72 




13,500 


220,78 




425,700 


7,066.62 




181,300 


5,009.58 




198,900 


3,301.74 




. 000 


863.20 




186,000 


3,08". 60 




134,800 


2, 23". 68 




68,400 


1,155.44 



Quarton, Gardner 5 Frances 



54,700 



908.02 



198 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Ragan, Ralph R. 

Ragan, Ralph R. $ Ruth M. 

Raja, Roy M. & Ellen A. 

Raker, Anne M. 

Rand, Lucy Kimball 

Rand, William M. § Priscilla W. 

Rando, Thomas 

Rappaport, Jerome L. 

Rapperport, Eugene J. § Lucy H. 

Rappoli, Arthur E. § Dorothy H. 

Rasco, Austin & Diane L. 

Rashin, Louis N. § Shirley A. 

Rawson, Edward B. § Nancy B. 

Ray, Kenneth J. § Marjorie L. 

Redmond, Rosemary Keough 

Reece, Richard C. $ Susan W. 

Reid, Cynthia J. 

Reider, W. James $ Ruth W. 

Reinherz, Bernard M. & Barbara J. 

Reinherz, Ellis L. 

Reliance Development Co. 

Relman, Arnold S. § Harriet V. 

Repko, Bruce 

Reservoir Nursing Home Inc. 

Resnick, Charles H. § Marie J. 

Ricci, Louis, Fred § Charles 

Ricci, Russell J. $ Carla W. 

Rice, Clifton V. & Margaret-Ann 

Rice, Paul G. 

Rice, James F. Jr. $ Barbara A. 

Richardson, Frederick C. $ Ingemarie M. 

Riker, E. William & Evelyn N. 

Riley, Allston § Marion H. 

Risch, Martin D. 

Risley, Curtis A. £ Jean F. 

Ritsher, John A. & Cynthia W. 

Rizzo, William J. $ Jane L. 

Robbins, Frederick J. 

Robbins, Roland W. § Geraldine 

Roberts, Paul 0. £ Martha Jean 

Robey, Harriet 

Robinson, Dora A. 

Rodman, Paul N. 

Roehr, George L. § Marcia A. 

Rogers, A. Lewis & Deborah P. 

Rogers, Alfred P. S Louise E. 

Rogers, David E. & Susan B. 

Rogers, Harriet J. 

Rogers, Joseph H. 

Rogers, Mabelle, Winifred & Evelyn 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 11,700 


$ 194.22 




111,900 


1,857.54 




119,400 


1,982.04 




225,100 


3,736.66 




279,300 


4,636.38 




187,400 


3,110.84 




189,200 


3,140.72 




250,300 


4,154.98 




141,300 


2,345.58 




126,200 


2,094.92 




139,500 


2,315.70 




153,900 


2,554.74 




126,400 


2,098.24 




105,900 


1,757.94 




141,300 


2,345.58 




174,500 


2,896.70 




120,100 


1,993.66 




163,000 


2,705.80 




347,500 


5,768.50 




157,700 


2,617.82 




800 


13.28 




202,900 


3,368.14 




35,800 


594.28 




200 


3.32 




211,900 


3,517.54 




116,900 


1,940.54 




170,800 


2,835.28 




92,700 


1,538.82 




94,500 


1,568.70 




83,800 


1,391.08 




130,000 


2,158.00 




121,900 


2,023.54 




47,700 


791.82 




115,500 


1,917.30 




124,300 


2,063.38 




246,600 


4,093.56 




101,900 


1,691.54 




125,600 


2,084.96 




79,200 


1,314.72 




221 ,200 


3,671.92 




152,400 


2,529.84 




69,000 


1,145.40 




265,200 


4,402.32 




290.000 


4,814.00 




195,600 


3,246.96 




164,100 


2,724.06 




19,000 


515.40 




119,900 


1,990.34 




21 ,600 


358.56 




157,700 


2.617.82 



199 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Rogerson, Henry S. § Grace S. 

Rolfe, Edward & Stephanie 

Rollins, James L. Jr. & Norma 

Rood, Jane 

Rose, James § Glenys 

Rosen, Esther L. 

Rosen, Joseph § Pearl S. 

Rosen, Paul § Annette 

Rosenthal, Richard § Blanche A. 

Rosenwald, Harold § Betty Booth 

Ross, Paul F. $ Rita 

Ross, William C. $ Marian L. 

Rossbach, Leopold J. § Janice 

Rossiter, Selina G. 

Rossoni, John P. $ Paola M. 

Rossoni, Paola M. 

Roth, David A. 

Row, Ronald V. $ Jane 

Rowe, Standish S. 

Roy, Eugene U. 

Roy, Shirley I . 

Rudin, N. Arthur § Natalie L. 

Rudmik, Andres § Norma 

Rudnick, Mitchell K. & Rosalie A. 

Ruggiero, Robert § Cheryl A. 

Rugo, Henry J. § Faith W. 

Rural Land Foundation 

Russell, John P. $ Mary-Ellen H.M. 

Russell, William B. § Anne H. 



Ryan 
Ryan 



Alice B. 

Frank A. 
Ryan, James J. I 
Ryan, William F, 

William H, 

Russell E, 



Ryan , 
Ryer , 



Helen 

& Helen M. 

& Mary B., Trustees 

§ Margaret C . 



Sabbag, Arthur $ Evelyn J 

Sacknoff , Eric J . 

Salmon, Walter J 

Salvini , Gai 1 P . 

Sandy Pond Trust 

Santa, Cecelia F. 

Sargent, Dennis S 

Sartori, Louis R. & Ruth M. 

Sartori , Louis R. 

Satterfield, Charles N. $ Anne P 

Savage, Orrin T. & Helen A. 

Sawtell, Clement C. § Adelaide I 

Schatzberg, Alan F. $ Nancy S. 



& Marjorie B. 
$ David K. Jr. 



Trustee 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 90,400 


$ 1 ,500.64 




133,900 


2,222.74 




142,300 


2,362.18 




82,600 


1,371.16 




105,900 


1 ,757.94 




120,100 


1,993.66 




158,400 


2,629.44 




95,000 


1,577.00 




122,400 


2,031.84 




202,200 


3,356.52 




186,600 


3,097.56 




153,300 


2,544.78 




282,300 


4,686.18 




146,100 


2,425.26 




196,500 


3,261.90 




90,400 


1,500.64 




225,300 


3,739.98 




147,700 


2,451.82 




148,700 


2,468.42 




67,500 


1,120.50 




73,800 


1,225.08 




128,000 


2,124.80 




114,500 


1,900.70 




159,200 


2,642.72 




60,600 


1,005.96 




190,800 


3,167.28 




1,625,000 


26,975.00 




146,000 


2,423.60 




297,800 


4,943.48 




113,800 


1,889.08 




96,900 


1,608.54 




96,100 


1,595.26 




149,800 


2,486.68 




279,200 


4,634.72 




110,800 


1,839.28 




83,300 


1,382.78 




154,300 


2,561.38 




166,000 


2,755.60 




150,000 


2,490.00 




1,270,800 


21,095.28 




134,100 


2,226.06 




151,300 


2,511.58 




165,600 


2,748.96 




36,200 


600.92 




155,100 


2,574.66 




123,200 


2,045.12 




133,000 


2,207.80 




165,800 


2,752.28 



200 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Scheff, Benson H. § Betty Jane 

Scheft, William A. § Gertrude W. 

Scheuer, Harry 

Schildbach, Muriel 

Schliemann, Peter S. $ Diane P. 

Schmid, Wilfried § Marina D. 

Schuller, Edward W. § Elizabeth B. 

Schwann, William § Aire-Maija 

Schwann, William, Exec. 

Schwartz, Judah L. § Ellen A. 

Schwarz, Francis G. & Ruth L. 

Scott, Bruce R. § Anne M. 

Scott, Eleanor B. 

Seaver, John D. § Millicent 

Sederquist , Douglas A. § Patricia A 

Sedgwick, Harold Bend 

Seeckts, Ehlert W. § Eleanor R. 

Seeckts, Ehlert W. § Eleanor R. , § 

Stout, Caroline W. 
Seeley, George W. § Susan A. 
Segal, Robert M. & Sharlee M. 
Selland, James 0. 



§ Barbara N, 
§ Joan E. 
§ Susan M. 
§ Martha S. 



Semerjian, Evan Y 
Seville, Alfred R 
Sewall , Steven H. 
Sexton, Maurice J 
Shaffer, William A. § Ellen D. 
Shallah, George § Lynda A. 
Shamsai, Javid 
Shansky, David § Nettie 
Shapiro, David § Esther 
Shapiro, George L. § Phyllis B. 
Shapiro, Robert & Wera Hildebrand 
Sharpe, John G. & Jeanne B. 

§ Margaret T. 



rigid M. 
£ Elizabeth Owen 



Shea, William J 

Sheehan, Gerald G. 

Sheldon, Mary W. 

Shenton, Robert 

Shepard, G. Dudley & Mary Macy 

Sheridan, Mary Ann 

Sherlo Realty Co. Inc. 

Shuman. Mark D. £ Lena M. 

Sichel, Enid 

Silverstein, Fred P. £ Mary J. 

Simms , Margaret J . 

Simon, Michael P 

Simonds , Raymond 

Pratt, Kathleen 
Simourian, John, Trustee 
Sisson, John H. $ Barbara 



£ Margaret J . 
Kelley, Mary Ann & 



161,400 
152,200 
128,900 
102,100 

93,000 
174,500 
124,200 
135,500 

71,400 
142,300 
215,300 
227,300 
131,000 
158,900 

99,700 
155,600 
170,400 

15,300 

99,300 

132,300 

82,700 

190,700 

138,300 

242,900 

80,700 

99,900 

81,200 

32,800 

143,500 

159,500 

159,800 

224,900 

121,400 

92,500 

107,100 

128,100 

214,600 

111,000 

40,000 

122,600 

163,900 

121,800 

101,400 

86,500 

97,600 

79,800 
171,500 
197,600 



2,679.24 
2,526.52 
2,139.74 
1,694.86 
1,543.80 
2,896.70 
2,061.72 
2,249.30 
1,185.24 
2,362.18 
3,573.98 
3,773.18 
2,174.60 
2,637.74 
1,655.02 
2,582.96 
2,828.64 

253.98 
1,648.38 
2,196.18 
1,372.82 
3,165.62 
2,295.78 
4,032.14 
1,339.62 
1,658.34 
1,347.92 

544.48 
2,382.10 
2,647.70 
2,652.68 
3,733.34 
2,015.24 
1,535.50 
1,777.86 
2,126.46 
3,562.36 
1,842.60 

664.00 
2,035.16 
2,720.74 
2,021.88 
1,683.24 
1,435.90 
1,620.16 

1,324.68 
2,846.90 
3,280.16 



201 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Skinner, Louis T. $ Hope J. 

Slav in , Gerald D. 

Slayter, Henry S. 5 Elizabeth M. 

Smethurst, Chester D. 

Smith, Alan B. $ Marjorie B. 

Smith, Arthur D. $ Jean C. 

Smith, Carl D. £ Florence C. 

Smith, Colin L.M. § Diana Dennison 

Smith, Converse B. $ Nellie L. 

Smith, Harold Dean $ Elizabeth H. 

Smith, Peter S. 5 Linda J. 

Smith, Steven A. $ Karen M. 

Smith, Sumner 

Smith, William J. § Barbara J. 

Smith, Doris Hall, Trustee 

Smulowicz, Bronislaw § Sawera 

Smyth, Robert R. & Adella C. 

Snelling, Charles A. 

Snelling, Howard § Elizabeth J. 

Snelling, Jacquelyn H. 

Snelling, Jessica 

Snelling, John R. 

Snelling, Norman J. § Carolyn R. 

Snider, Greta W. 

Snow, Robert C. 

Society for the Preservation of 

New England Antiquities 
Solar, Barry § Judith 
Solar, Robert L. £ Jane M. 
Solman, Fred J. Ill & Claire F. 
Spaeth, Daniel A. £ Margaret A. 
Spencer, Henry W. £ Marguerite G. 
Spindler, James W. £ Mary B. 
Spock, Michael $ Judith IV. 
Spooner, Frederick C. $ Sarah W. 
Spooner, Lily T. 
Spreadbury, Peter E. 
Spreadbury, Roberta I. 
Squibb, Mildred G. 
Squire, James R. $ Barbara L. 
Stam, Allan Jr. $ Kathleen 
Stankard, Charles E. Jr. & Jean C. 
Stanzler, Alan L. $ Margaret A. 
Stason, William B. $ Susan B. 
Staszesky, Barbara F. & Francis 
Stathos, Charles A. & Margaret M. 
Stebbins Realty Trust 
Stecher, Robert W. £ Barbara M. 
Stein, Freeman 5 Kitty 
Steinetz, Scott 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 363,300 


$ 6,030.78 




76,400 


1,268.24 




113,400 


1,882.44 




38,900 


645.74 




213,000 


3,555.80 




134,600 


2,234.36 




90,900 


1 ,508.94 




158,000 


2,622.80 




171,300 


2,843.58 




130,800 


2,171.28 




200 


3.32 




57,000 


946.20 




313,300 


5,200.78 




107,900 


1,791.14 




118,700 


1,970.42 




128,700 


2,136.42 




104,800 


1,739.68 




113,800 


1,889.08 




104,200 


] ,729.72 




138,300 


2,295.78 




165,800 


2,752.28 




99,200 


1,646.72 




109,000 


1,809.40 




69,000 


1,145.40 




121,800 


2,021.88 




255,700 


4,244.62 




183,500 


3,046.10 




155,700 


2,584.62 




93,900 


1,558.74 




97,200 


1,613.52 




211,000 


5,502.60 




219,000 


3,655.40 




128,800 


2,158.08 




66,800 


1,108.88 




98,100 


1,628.46 




196,600 


5,263.56 




109,100 


1,811.06 




60,700 


1,0 




i9~,200 


73.52 




.400 


- 1 . 64 




120,800 


2,005.28 




.600 


26.36 




198,300 


3,291.78 




136,300 


2,262.58 




190,400 


3,160.64 




85,900 


-5.94 




150,800 


2,503.28 




85,100 


1,412.66 




118,800 


1,972.08 



202 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Steinhilper, Frank A. £ Anne C. 
Stevens, Edmund Jr. § Shari R. 
Stevenson, Howard H. § Sarah W. 
Stevenson, John P. § Patricia A. 
Stevenson, Philip D. § Joan L. 
Stewart, Francis J. Jr. § Ruth L 
Stimmell, David H. § Grace B. 
Stockholm, Nan § Marguerite P. 
Stokes, Catherine S. 
Stone, Barry S. § Marcia 
Stratford Realty Co. Inc. 
Street, Earle B. § Janet H. 
Strickler, Elizabeth L. } 
Striker, William W. § Marjorie B 
Subsick, Walter J. 
Sugar, Elizabeth R. 
Sullivan, Gladys G. 
Sussman, Joseph § Henri-Ann 
Sutherland, Robert L. § Ann F. 
Svetz, Paul J. § Linda M. 
Swain, Douglas M. § Rhonda F. 
Swanson, Richard E. 
Sweeney, Carl F. Jr. § Alice P. 
Swett, Joan D. 
Swift, Phyllis 

Sykes, David F. & Margaret P. 
Sylvia, Lawrence M. 



Tang, Thomas L., Connie, Nora & Lisa 
Tannert , H. Michael & Hopkins, Joanna 
Tartaglia, Giovanni & Lucia 
Taschioglou, Kemon P. § Rhoda K. 
Tat lock, Richard § Jane F. 
Taunton-Rigby , Roger $ Alison 
Taylor, Edward S. 
Taylor, Frederick B. & Lex H. 
Taylor, Lillian C. 
Taylor, Timothy A. § Jeannine L. 
Taylor, W. Royce 5 Dorothy V. 
Teabo, Prince C. § Elizabeth T. 
Telling, Irving q Jane Cushman 
Tenneco Inc. 

Tennican, Michael L. $ Catherine W. 
Terrell, John H. & Mary H. 
Tetreault, Claire F. 
Thomas, Gordon W. & Alice M. 
Thomas, George W. Jr. & Jane C. 
Thompson, Donald J. 
Thompson, Harry 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 227,900 


$ 3,783.14 




199,400 


3,310.04 




24,600 


408.36 




164,900 


2,737.34 




189,100 


3,139.06 




129,300 


2,146.38 




91,100 


1,512.26 




124,300 


2,063.38 




133,600 


2,217.76 




144,800 


2,403.68 




235,000 


3,901.00 




145,700 


2,418.62 




138,100 


2,292.46 




88,800 


1,474.08 




280,700 


4,659.62 




101,500 


1,684.90 




67,700 


1,123.82 




154,000 


2,556.40 




157,200 


2,609.52 




149,700 


2,485.02 




147,100 


2,441.86 




87,700 


1,455.82 




139,200 


2,310.72 




132,300 


2,196.18 




187,000 


3,104.20 




129,600 


2,151.36 




119,400 


1,982.04 




115,200 


1,912.32 




125,600 


2,084.96 




86,400 


1,434.24 




185,900 


3,085.94 




156,200 


2,592.92 




129,600 


2,151.36 




158,200 


2,626.12 




135,200 


2,244.32 




115,300 


1,913.98 




108,400 


1,799.44 




138,200 


2,294.12 




87,200 


1,447.52 




161,400 


2,679.24 


346,501 


4,400 


5,824.96 




212,500 


3,527.50 




97,200 


1,613.52 




128,400 


2,151.44 




117,400 


1 ,948.84 




73,300 


1.216.78 




176,500 


2,929.90 




257,700 


4,277.82 



203 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Thompson, G. Brooks J. $ Arlene 

Thompson, Lawrence E. G Dorothy A. 

Thomson, Anne Pearmain 

Thorne, Karen Oshana 

Thornton, Peter S Ann M. 

Three S Realty Trust 

Thurow, Lester C. & Pfuetze, Gretchen A. 

Tilburg, William E. 6 Elsie Ann 

Tinder, Glenn & Gloria 

Tingey, William J. Jr. $ Ruth V. 

Tingley, Frederick M. & Dilla G. 

Titlebaum, Earl S. $ Sandra R. 

Titus, William A. 

Todd, Conrad & Harriet 

Todd, C. Lee Jr., Eveleth R. , David 6 

John 
Toeplitz, Gideon T. tj Ransom, Gail 
Toksoz, M. Nafi § Helena 
Toler, Louise C. 

Tomasic, Michael G. § Beverly F. 
Tong, Pin £ Siang Wen Chao 
Torode, Herbert L. £ Lorraine S. 
Torri, Edward F. £ Myra M. 
Torti, Maurice L. Jr. § Nancy H. 
Touborg, Jens N.F. $ Margaret B. 
Tracey, Elizabeth M. 
Tracey, Robert J. 
Tracey, Robert J. £ Caroline J. 
Travers , Paul £ Bernice 
Trevelyan, Eoin W. P T J . Ann 
Troisi, Eugene A. 
Troisi, Ferdinand L. 5 Mary G. 
Tucker, Janet L. 

Tunnel 1, Raymond W. & Suzanne D. 
Turano, Anthony J. f T Florence T. 
Turner, James R. & Mildred B. 
Turner, Vernon D. F, Merrylees K. 
Tutko, Stephen D. & Susan L. 
Tyler, Priscilla D. 
Tyler, Heirs of Watson 



U.S. Dynamics Realty Trust 
Umbrello, Carmel V. 
Umbrello, Francis 5 Virginia 
Urner, Joseph F. 



Valley Pond Realty Trust 

Van Buren, Harold S. & Barrett, Beatrice H 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 91,900 


$ 1,525.54 




184,600 


3,064.36 




80,700 


1,339.62 




131,800 


2,187.88 




198,400 


3,293.44 




372,500 


6,183.50 




238,200 


3,954. 12 




139,200 


2,310.72 




192,400 


3,193.84 




156,800 


2,602.88 




116,200 


1 ,928.92 




136,300 


2,262.58 




45,000 


747.00 




302,300 


5,018. 18 




86,900 


1,442.54 




84,100 


1,396.06 




40,200 


667.32 




91,000 


1,510.60 




193,600 


3,213.76 




107,900 


1,791.14 




91,300 


1,515.58 




147,700 


2,451.82 




168,400 


2,795.44 




390,300 


6,478.98 




185,500 


3,046. 10 




157,300 


2,611. 18 




212,600 


3,529.16 




163,200 


2,709.12 




124,500 


2,066.70 




138,200 


2,294.12 




85,800 


1,424.28 




7,900 


131.14 




139,600 


2,317.36 




14,200 


235.72 




118,100 


1,960.46 




155,000 


2,207.80 




248,000 


4,116.80 




152,700 


2,534.82 




59,700 


991.02 




10,500 


170.98 




84,400 


1,401.04 




108,900 


1,8' 




104,900 


. 11.34 




..^00 


545 


H. 


220,600 


,1.96 



204 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Van Leer, Hans 

Van Leer, R. Karl § Rachel D. 

Van Leer, Rachel D. 

Venier, Ettore P. $ Mary E. 

Vercollone, Edmund S. £ Julia 

Vernon, Richard § Gretchen 

Vitale, Joseph A. 

Vockel Virginia £ Geisenhainer 

Gail Ruth 
Von Mertens, Peter B. § Page 



Wadsworth , Virginia D. 

Wales, Betty R. 

Wales, R. Langdon $ Ruth W. 

Wales, Roger S. § Patricia R. 

Walker, John F. & Joan McK. 

Walker, Sidney A. 

Wallwork, Edwin N. $ Janice C. 

Walsh, Patricia R. 

Walter, Charlton M. q Rosly M. 

Walton, Frank E. & Julie 

Wang, An & Lorraine C. 

Wang, Chiu-Chen § Pauline C. 

Wang, Frederick A. 

Ward, Jane L. 

Ward, Walter B. & Sophie E. 

Ward, Walter B. Jr. $ Marie L. 

Warner, Henrietta S. 

Warner, Patricia R. 

Warren, Duncan 0. $ Helen D. 

Watson, John P $ Van Ausdall , Gay 

Waugh, John S. 

Webb, Robert H. 

Webster, David & Winifred W. 

Weibel, Eugene A. & Wilma 

Weigel, Lynn B. 

Weingarten, Joseph £ Celeste 

Welch, Vernon F. $ Leatrice June 

Wells, Katherine W., Exec. 

Wengren, Margaret L. 

Wengren, Richard, et al. 

Wessell, William R. Jr. $ Roberta A 

West Newton Savings Banks 

Westcott, Vernon C. & Mary Alice 

Weyl, Alan J. $ Jane B. 

Whalen, William B. $ Mary E. 

What ley, Robert Boyd 5 Kay A. 

Wheeler, Bella C. 

Wheelock, Susan K. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 165,400 


$ 2,745.64 




179,600 


2,981.36 




21,700 


360.22 




219,600 


3,645.36 




103,700 


1,721.42 




238,400 


3,957.44 




106,500 


1,767.90 




91,200 


1,513.92 




89,700 


1,489.02 




154,300 


2,561.38 




166,400 


2,762.24 




139,500 


2,315.70 




107,700 


1,787.82 




150,000 


2,490.00 




180,000 


2,988.00 




111,000 


1,842.60 




115,300 


1,913.98 




205,700 


3,414.62 




69,400 


1,152.04 




347,300 


5,765.18 




203,100 


3,371.46 




330,600 


5,487.96 




90,600 


1,503.96 




88,700 


1,472.42 




102,200 


1,696.52 




154,800 


2,569.68 




132,200 


2,194.52 




141,800 


2,353.88 




62,700 


1,040.82 




152,900 


2,538.14 




113,900 


1,890.74 




197,000 


3,270.20 




56,800 


942.88 


4,200 




69.72 




155,900 


2,587.94 




97,300 


1,615.18 




194,700 


3,232.02 




249,700 


4,145.02 




24,000 


398.40 




117,000 


1,942.20 


7,300 




121.18 




97,800 


1,623.48 




235,100 


2,902.66 




87,900 


1 ,459.14 




99,800 


1 ,656.68 




97,600 


1,620.16 




191,200 


3,173.92 



205 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



White, Elinor & Grossbart , Samuel 
White, James B. 
White, Katherine S. $ John W. 
White, Robert E. $ Marion J. 
White, John R. $ Gina R. 
Whitman, Lawrence W. £ Joanne S. 
Whitman, Ross 5 Virginia R. 
Wiederhold, Pieter R. $ Anna J. 
Wilbor, John S. $ White, John W., 
Wildes, Robert S. $ Marie E. 
Wiley, David S. & Mary P. 
Wilfert, Fred J. § Eleanor M. 
Willemin, Julian V. § Jane A. 
Williams, Gregory P. g Janis L. 
Williams, Jane Cooper 
Williams, Edwin L. Jr. § Ruth D. 
Williams, William D. $ Gertrude 
Williams, William G. Jr. 
Willman, Werner S. § Margaret M. 
Wilson, Donald H. $ Cheryl L. 
Wilson, Robert A. £ Judith A. 
Winchell, Gordon D. 
Winchell, Gordon D. $ 
Winchell, Gordon D. tj 

Charles S. Jr. 
Winchell, Guilbert S. 
Winchell, Guilbert S. 

Winchell, H.O. $ Clark, S. 
Winchell, Richard P. & Martha 5 
Winship, Lee C. & Joyce L. 
Winship, Thomas & Elizabeth C. 
Witherby, Marianne J.H. 
Wofford, John G. & Joan W. 
Wolf, Robert G. Jr. $ Bryce M. 
Woo, Robert & Lillian H. 
Woo, Way Dong & Emily T. 
Wood, Hilve V. 
Wood, Robert M. & June W. 
Wood, Ronald F. $ Wendy L. 
Wood, Virginia S. 
Wood, George A. Jr. S Nancy S. 
Woodington, W. Gordon 6 Mary L 
Woods, Jane Y. 
Woods, Kathryn R. 
Work, Frederic C.T. & Locke, 

Jessica E. 
Worsham, Jack L. § Charlotte A 
Wright, Ma lor § Vaughn, Ruth 
Wu, Pei Rin 
Wu, Pei Rin <s Susan 



Exec. 



K. 



Enid M. 
Keevil , 

§ Amy Jane D. 
§ Amy Jane D. , 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 138,500 


$ 2,299.10 




149,700 


2,485.02 




231,200 


3,837.92 




120,700 


2,003.62 




226,300 


3,756.58 




168,200 


2,792.12 




252,700 


4,194.82 




227,000 


3,768.20 




145,200 


2,410.32 




114,500 


1,900.70 




150,500 


2,498.30 




81,600 


1,354.56 




' 89,000 


1,477.40 




48,200 


800.12 




98,800 


1,640.08 




120,900 


2,006.94 




144,100 


2,392.06 




70,000 


1,162.00 




150,900 


2,504.94 




141,500 


2,348.90 




57,900 


961.14 


4,200 


58,000 


1,032.52 




378,600 


6,284.76 




176,700 


2,933.2? 




139,700 


2,319.02 




161,600 


2,682.56 




182,300 


3,026.18 




123,700 


2,053.42 




260,100 


4,317.66 




126,600 


2,101.56 




142,600 


2,36". 16 




92,800 


1,540.48 




133,900 


2,222.74 




150,800 


2,503.23 




89,900 


1,492.34 




136,400 


2,264.24 




104,900 


1,741.34 




18,600 


308.76 




106,900 


1,774.54 




134,500 


2,232.70 




100,000 


1,660.00 




.200 


2,111.52 




310,500 


5,154.30 




148,600 


2,466.76 




122,200 


2,028.52 




60,000 


996.00 




128,000 


2,124.80 



206 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1981 



Wyatt, Peter W. § Janice B 



Yagjian, Jacob § Inez 
Yeuell, Kay M. £ Suzanne R. 
Yore, George P. $ Kathleen 
Yos, Jerrold M. $ Ann B. 
Young, .Anne 
Young, G. Stewart 
Young, Lee A. § Jane C. 
Young, Lucy C. 
Young, Robin C. § Laurie K. 



Zech, William R. P* Eileen M. 

Zevin, Anne 

Zimmerman, Herbert E. § Pearl S. 

Zimmerman, Robert M. , Zock, Robert A. 

Trs. 
Zuelke, Laurence W. § Nancy J. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 117,900 


$ 1,957.14 




11,000 


182.60 




142,900 


2,372.14 




64,500 


1,070.70 




90,600 


1,503.96 




200,700 


3,331.62 




123,500 


2,050.10 




124,700 


2,070.02 




140,700 


2,335.62 




106,800 


1,772.88 




136,500 


2,265.90 




138,500 


2,299.10 




1,100 


18.26 




205,200 


3,406.32 




94,700 


1,572.02 



207 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Archer des Cognets 
Virginia M. Niles 
William B. Russell 



3.50 
112.42 


115.92 


$ 


; 1,242.79 



DONALD GORDON RECR EATI ON FUND 
Cash Account 



June 30, 1981 Balances $ 1,005.79 

Interest income 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 351.40 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 1.52 

Less payments: 

Safe deposit box rent 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 

Total Expenditures 
Cash Balance at 6/30/81 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1981 

BayBank/Middlesex Bank $ 1,242.79 

MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 2,078.88 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 1,000.00 

1,000 American Tel § Tel Co. 4-5/8% 4/1/85 1,000.00 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4^% 2/15/90 1,001.48 

1,000 Virginia Electric § Power 4-1/8% 10/1/86 1,006.80 

1,000 Fed'l iNational Mortgage Assoc. 7.05% 6/10/92 990.00 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 


8,319.95 




3,111.53 
5,208.42 


$ 


8,319.95 





208 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1980 
Income received 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 

Codman Library Trust Fund 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth 
and Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 

Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 

George Russell Library Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

George G. $ Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

Lincoln Library Fund 

Thiessen Fund (Rental income) 
Donations - Gleason 

DeNormandie 
Thurow 



Payments: 

Safe deposit box rent and bank charges 

Purchase of books, Cannon Account 

Expenses, Hammond Account 

Purchase of tape equipment, DeNormandie Fund 

Purchase of books. Thiessen Fund 

Jay Daly, Librarian, J. H. Pierce Libr. Fund 

Purchase of plants, Gleason Account 

Deposited in savings accounts 

Interest allowed to accumulate 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1981 



176.57 



37.53 



74.86 




40.15 




10.38 




64.97 




32.05 




132.86 




156.38 




987.96 . 




86.56 




63.69 




297.90 


1,985.29 




78.00 




500.00 




300.00 




3,039.86 


3.50 




177.01 




24.76 




162.33 




195.67 




62.33 




52.00 




350.00 




591.59 


1,619.19 




$ 1,420.67 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1981 



BayBank/Middlesex 
Fund Income 
Donations - Cannon 

Friends of Library 

Gleason 

Thiessen 

DeNormandie 

Thurow 



Income on 






Deposit 


Principal 


Total 


112.94 




112.94 




148.34 


148.34 




53.71 


53.71 




26.00 


26.00 




651.23 


651.23 




337.67 


337.67 




300.00 


300.00 



209 



Income on 
Deposit 



Principal Total 



Codman Fund 

MMDT- Composite Trust Fund 37.53 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth 
§ Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 
MMDT- Composite Trust Fund 379.16 

Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 

MMDT- Composite Trust Fund 239.97 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

John H. Pierce Library Fun d 

1000 So. New Eng. Tel 5-3/4% '96 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

George Russell Library Fund 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 177.43 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 
1000 Fed. Nat'l Mort . 6.40% '87 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

George G. Tarbell Library Fund 
1000 So. New Eng. Tel 5-3/4% '96 
1000 So. Bell Tel, 4% '83 
1000 West. Mass. Elec. 4-3/8% *87 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

George G. § Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 
10,000 Duquesne Light 7% '99 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

C Edgar 6 Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
1000 Fed. Nat'l Mort. 6.40% '87 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

Lincoln Library Fund 

1000 So. New. Eng. Tel 5-3/4% '96 
MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 

$6,899.85 



656.90 



694.43 



1 .000.00 


1,379.16 


500.00 


739.97 


162.55 


162.55 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


117.21 


117.21 



415.74 



593.17 





956.25 


956.25 


299.91 


973.75 


1,273.66 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 


140.84 


138.38 


279.22 




9,925.00 


9,925.00 


5,253.12 


75.00 


5,328.12 




956.25 


956.25 


143.93 


273.52 


417.45 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 


115.02 




115.02 



$22,667.50 529,567.35 



210 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash Balance at July 1, 1980 
Income received 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 

Dividends 

Interest 

General Appeal 

July 4th Parking 

Old Town Hall Corp. 

Ogden Codman Trust 
Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 
Withdrawn from savings 
Investment certificate matured 5/22/81 



Payments, per order of trustees: 
80-81 Grants 
Safe deposit box rent 
Interest allowed to accumulate 
Printing and mailing expense 

Purchase of investment certificate to mat. 

Purchase of investment certificate to mat. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1981 



$ 2,298.79 



5/22/81 
7/15/81 



1,711.16 
1,078.00 
3,290.00 
525.91 
1,500.00 
6,400.00 



7,550.00 

3.50 

546.33 

382.32 

15,000.00 

15,531.67 



14,505.07 

.84 

. 10,500.00 

15,000.00 

$ 42,304.70 



39,013.82 
$ 3,290.88 



Cash § Securities at June 30, 1981 

BayBank/Middlesex $ 3,290.88 

Composite Trust Fund, MMDT 3,065.23 

Provident Institution for Savings Investment Cert., 7/15/81 15,531.67 

1,000 Pacific Gas § Electric Co. 5% 6/1/89 1,000.76 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4*2% 2/15/90 1,001.48 

5,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 4,987.50 

6,000 Southern New England Telephone Co. 5-3/4% 1/1/96 6,007.05 

80 Shares Exxon Corporation 3,016.85 

100 Shares Northern Indiana Public Service Co. 2,973.63 

5000 Commonwealth Edison 8% 8/1/01 4,868.75 

$ 45,743.80 



Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 
Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 
Ernest P. Neumann Memorial Fund 
General Fund 



1,000.00 

1,770.00 

5,005.00 

37,968.80 

$ 45,743.80 



211 





$ 


1,556.03 

1,675.49 

9.40 

3,240.92 


500.00 






500.00 






300.00 






370.42 






3.50 






199.10 




1,873.02 




$ 


1,367.90 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1980 

Interest income received 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 

Payments per order of Trustees 
Helen Caldicott, Honorarium 
Elias Gyftopoulos, Honorarium 
Lester Thurow, Honorarium 
Printing § postage 
Safe deposit box rent 
Bank interest allowed to accumulate 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1981 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1981 

BayBank/Middlesex $ 1,367.90 

MMDT - Composite Trust Funds 3,795.01 

3,000 American Tel. § Tel. Co. 4-3/8% 4/1/85 3,005.22 

3,000 Niagara Mbhawk Power Co. 3-5/8% 5/1/86 2,913.75 

1,000 Virginia Electric $ Power Co. 4-1/8% 10/1/86 1,006.80 

2,000 Idaho Power Co. 4^% 1/1/87 2,000.00 

3,000 Western Mass Electric Co. 4-3/8% 4/1/87 3,000.00 

1,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 6.40% 12/11/87 956.25 

1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4-3/4% 11/15/87 1,003.39 

1,000 Alabama Power Co. 3-7/8% 1/1/88 1,000.00 

3,000 Pacific Tel. $ Tel Co. 4-3/8% 8/15/88 3,032.82 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4^% 2/15/90 1,001.48 

3,000 New England Power Co. 4-5/8% 11/1/91 3,017.91 

3,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 7.05% 6/10/92 2,970.00 

3,000 Atchison Topeka $ Santa Fe RR 4% 10/1/95 3,000.00 

2,000 Commonwealth Edison 8% 8/1/01 1,947.50 



$35,018.03 



Accumulated income 3,050.96 

Principal 31,967.07 

$35,018.03 



212 





$ 




1,448.38 

4.28 

2,000.00 






3,452.66 


8.72 
27.43 
53.81 






1,378.67 

1,962.50 

26.76 




3,457.89 




$ 


(5.23: 



DEC0RD0VA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1980 

Interest income 1/1/80 - 6/30/81 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 

2,000 U. S. Treasury 3^% 11/15/80 matured 



Deduct : 

Bank charges § safe deposit box rent 
Interest allowed to accumulate 
Deposited in savings 
Paid to Town of Lincoln 

net income 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 
2,000 U. S. Treasury 12-5/8% 5/15/95 
Accrued interest on 2,000 U.S. Treasury 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1981 



Cash § Securities at June 30, 1981 

*BayBank/Middlesex $ (5.23) 

MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 1,265.39 

3,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 3,003.54 

1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4^% 1/1/87 1,000.00 

2,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 6.40% 12/11/87 1,912.50 

1,000 Pacific Tel § Tel Co. 4-3/8% 2/15/88 1,003.15 

2,000 General Telephone Co. 4-1/8% 3/1/88 2,005.02 

1,000 Pacific Gas $ Electric Co. 5% 6/1/89 1,000.76 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4%% 2/10/90 1,001.48 

4,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 3,960.00 

2,000 Southern New England Tel 5-3/4% 11/1/96 2,002.88 

1,000 American Tel £ Tel 8-5/8% 2/1/07 978.75 

1,000 Commonwealth Edison 8% 8/1/01 973.75 

3,000 U. S. Treasury 8-3/4% 11/15/08 2,925.00 

2,000 U. S. Treasury 12-5/8% 5/15/95 1,962.50 

$ 24,989.49 

*The amount paid to Town of Lincoln was overpaid by $5.23. 
An adjustment will be made in FY 82. 



213 



JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1980 
Interest income 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 

Deduct: 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1981 



Bank Deposits at June 30, 1981 



BayBank/Middlesex 

Concord Cooperative Bank 

Concord Cooperative Bank Term Certificate 



Accumulated Income 

Interest on Term Cert, available to Lincoln Scholarship Fund 

Principal 



$ 


19.64 
246.55 


266.19 
246.55 


$ 


19.64 




$ 


19.64 

75.90 

3,120.90 


$ 


3,216.44 




1,560.54 

420.90 

1,235.00 


$ 


3,216.44 





ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 
Cash Account 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1980 
Interest income 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 



Less bank interest allowed to accumulate 



15.24 



$ 


41.16 
55.24 


$ 


96.40 

15.24 


$ 


81.16 





Cash and Securities at June 30, 1981 



BayBank/Middlesex 

MMDT, Composite Trust Fund 

1000 Southern Bell Telephone 4$ 10/1/83 



$ 81.16 

281.03 

1,000,00 

$ 1,362.19 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



137.14 
1,225.05 

$ 1,362.19 



214 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1980 
Interest income 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 



Interest allowed to accumulate 
Cash Balance at June 30, 1981 



$ 


5.55 

26.27 


$ 


31.82 
26.27 


$ 


5.55 





Bank Deposits at June 30, 1981 

BayBank/Middlesex $ 5.55 
MMDT - Composite Trust Fund 484.21 

$ 489,76 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 



Cash Account 



Interest income received 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 $ 79.79 

Paid to the Town of Lincoln $ 58.43 

Interest allowed to accumulate 21.36 79.79 



Bank Deposits at June 30, 1980 
MMDT - Composite Trust Fund $ 1,238.88 



TRICENTENNIAL TRUST FUND 



Cash Balance at 7/1/80 

Interest income 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 

Cash Balance 6/30/81 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 


1,223.89 
117.53 


$ 


1,341.42 




$ 


341.42 
1,000.00 


$ 


1,341.42 





215 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



Cash Account 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1980 
Income received 7/1/80 - 6/30/81 

Interest on investments 

Interest on savings 

Elsie Pierce Trust 

Use of Pierce House 

Other income 
Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 
Withdrawn from savings 

TOTAL RECEIP: 

Payments per order of the Selectmen: 

Medical Assistance to needy townspeople 
60+ Health Clinic 
Pierce House expenses 

Repairs and maintenance 

Supplies and furnishings 

Painting interior and exterior 

Manager Compensation 

Gas (heating) 

Overrun under Article #17, 3/31/80 
Mowing, Pierce Park grounds 
Rubbish removal 
Miscellaneous 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Safe deposit box rent and bank charges 
Return of deposits 
Transferred to Middlesex Institution for Savings 



Cash Balance June 30, 1981 





$ 


5,338.69 


$ 8,476.73 






1,065.58 






3,655.64 






16,925.00 






1,308.10 




31,431.05 

6.60 

4,000.00 




$ 


40,776.34 

150.00 
585.65 


3,646.86 






2,560.26 






3,875.00 






6,296.80 






2,749.89 






3,604.71 




24,010.45 

3,888.72 

1,084.95 

696.12 

1,016.48 

17.50 

886.50 

3,500.00 


iMENTS 


$ 


35,836.37 




$ 


4,939.97 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1981 



Unrestricted as to Principal and Interest 

Bay Bank/Middlesex 

MMDT - Composite Trust Fund 

5,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4-3/8% 4/1/85 

1,000 Virginia Electric 4-1/8% 10/1/96 

3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3-5/8% 5/1/86 

4,000 Federal National Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 

5,000 Pacific Telephone and Telegraph 4-3/8% 8/15/; 

2,000 Federal National Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 

5,000 U. S. Treasury 8-3/4% 11/15/08 



4,939.97 

17,641.65 

4,856.00 



006.90 
913.75 
825.00 
036.87 
980.00 



4,875.00 



SUBTOTAL 



$ 47,075.14 



216 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



continued 



Balance forward 



$ 47,075.14 



Restricted as to Principal 



Union Warren Savings Bank 

10,000 International Bank for Reconstruction 4^% 2/1/82 

21,000 Federal National Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 

10,000 Federal National Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 

10,000 Southern California Edison Co. 7-1/8% 1/15/94 

10,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 

5,000 Southern New England Telephone 5-3/4% 11/1/96 

10,000 Florida Power and Light Co. 6% 12/1/96 

10,000 Pacific Gas and Electric Co. 4-5/8% 6/1/97 

10,000 American Telephone and Telegraph 4-3/4% 6/1/98 

10,000 Duke Power Co. 7% 2/1/99 

10,000 Southwestern Bell Telephone 8%% 3/1/14 



874.80 

9,975.00 

20,081.25 

9,900.00 

10,000.00 

9,975.00 

5-, 000. 00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

9,503.50 



GRAND TOTAL 



$ 162,384.69 



217 



Financial Section &Warrant for the 
1982 Annual Town Meeting 




Lincoln 
Massachusetts 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

REPORT 

of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

1981 



Cover - We are grateful to Stephen Sakowich of the DeCordova 
Museum staff for his help in designing the cover. 






LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Edward S. Dewey 

David M. Elwood 

Charlotte Friel 

Sarah Holden 

Lawrence E. Thompson, Chairman 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 



1982-1983 



Two Town budgets with paired recommendations on money warrant 
articles are presented in this Report. One set calls for total ex- 
penditures of $5,560,000, the other for $5,612,000. The first observe; 
the tax levy limit imposed on Lincoln for 1983 by Proposition Tl\ .J/ 
The second exceeds the levy limit, and therefore would have to be 
ratified by voter approval of a Referendum motion to raise the present 
levy limit at Town Election, March 29, 1982. 

PROPOSALS ($000,s) 
#1 #2 



Town Operating Budget $2,636 $2,660 

Education Budgets 2,869 2,884 

Warrant Articles 55 68 

Total $5,560 $5,612 



Inclusion of two budgets, each with an accompanying warrant article 
recommendation, is unique in this Report. It complicates discussion, 
and therefore we should first explain why the issues are being presented 
in this way. 

The reason for. pairing warrant article choices with budget decisions 
is given by Proposition 2\. Indirectly, it fixes an upper limit for 
total Town expenditures and thereby forces warrant article appropriations 
to be thought of as dollar-for-dollar competitors with Town operating and 
education budgets for a limited pool of funds. Different Warrant 
Article recommendations (above ) account , then, for $13,000 of the 
$52,000 difference between the two proposals. We shall return to the 
Warrant Article recommendations in the last section. 

As for the presentation of two budgets, Budget #1 ( M 2V) responds 
to the belief that voters should be shown what a Proposition l\ budget 
looks like and be given a chance to vote on it. To that end we have 
attempted to prepare a budget which reflects the widest possible 
agreement on how funds should be distributed among spending centers 
within the constraint of existing law. Another reason for presenting 
a lh budget stems from the timing of Town Meeting (March 27) and Town 
Election (March 29). It would be improper, some say illegal, to ask 
for acceptance at Town Meeting of a non-complying budget in advance of 
the Referendum vote required to give it legal standing. 



1. Under Proposition 2-^, Lincoln will be permitted to increase property 
taxation for 1983 by 2^% ($101,000) plus an allowance for new 
additions to the tax roll ($79,000). 



On the other hand, there is support (below) for adoption of a 
somewhat larger budget. Budget //2 is presented to show where opposition 
to the l\ budget is focused and the specific line item increases which 
are recommended as alternative appropriations. If the l\ budget is 
rejected at Town Meeting and the Referendum motion to increase the 
tax levy limit is passed, Budget //2 will be moved for adoption at a 
reconvened Town Meeting, probably the evening of March 30. 

In summary the presentation of two proposals is intended to help 
us find our way through an awkward procedural situation. They provide 
information for informed votes at Saturday's Town Meeting and Monday's 
Referendum. They also promise for Tuesday night to avert the confusion 
of an unplanned rash of special interest motions to increase the budget, 
if we get to that point. 



Recommendations of Selectmen and members of the Finance Committee 
for votes on the two proposals are: 



Selectmen 
Finance Committee 



Proposal //l {l\) 


Prop< 


Dsal //2 


For Against 


For 


Against 


3 


3 





1 4 


4 


1 



Accordingly, all Selectmen and 4 of 5 members of the Finance 
Committee recommend a- "Yes" vote on Question 1 (to increase the Town 
tax levy limit by $100,000) which will be presented on the ballot at 
Town Election, March 29, 1982. The increase in the levy limit, if 
voted, would only be valid for 1983. 



TAX OUTLOOK FOR FISCAL 1983 

There are other reasons, having to do with the uncertainty of 
underlying revenue and assessment estimates and the consequence of 
mistakes, which call for an override of the present tax levy limit, 
but we should also point out that the choice of Proposal //2 over 
Proposal #1 involves relatively little money and correspondingly pro- 
mises relatively little effect on 1983 tax bills. 



The $52,000 difference between proposals amounts to roughly 1% of 
total appropriations proposed for 1983. Measured in tax terms, the 
differential can be thought of as an approximate 20c difference in the 
1983 tax rate, or perhaps more meaningfully, as a $20 difference per 
$100,000 of assessed property value in everyone's tax bill. 



As for the amount of tax, we estimate that average tax bills will 
increase by about 3% with the lk proposal, or by 5% with the recommended 
proposal. Those percentages will be produced by a drop in the tax rate 
from its present level of $16.60 per $1,000 of assessed value to either 
$15.60 or $15.80, and by a 10% increase in property assessments. 

To give perspective to all of this, it should be noted that Lincoln 
taxpayers, on average, will pay slightly smaller taxes in 1983, with 
either proposal, than we paid in fiscal 1979, four years ago .J./ A 
longer time period comparison is only slightly less impressive. Since 
1975 (the Town's present fiscal accounting period was adopted in that 
year) the average tax bill has grown at a compound annual rate of less 
than 2%. By comparison, the consumer price index for Metropolitan 
Boston has grown at an 8-^% rate over the same period. 



THE LIMIT ON TOWN APPROPRIATIONS 

This year a great deal of work has gone into the determination 
of one number - $5,560,000 - the upper limit for appropriations which 
will permit Lincoln to remain in compliance with Proposition l\. It 
is a crucial number, but we should emphasize as we did last year, it 
is also a highly uncertain number. Proposition l\ fixes an absolute 
limit for property tax increases, not for spending increases. Its 
influence on permitted spending increases will be modified by the 
availability of funds coming from non-property-tax sources and the 
amount of payments which must be made to the State, County, and MBTA. 
For that reason it is important to be clear about how the l\ spending 
limit was computed. The arithmetic follows, with some comment on the 
most uncertain items. Estimates used in obtaining the State's certi- 
fication of 1982 taxes are included for comparison. 



The average tax bill dropped 11% in 1980, largely because of an 
increase in State aid. Subsequent annual increases of 8% in 1981, 
1% in 1982, and projected 3 to 5% in 1983 leave the average bill 
slightly below 1979. This conclusion was confirmed by examination 
of a small sample of individual tax bills: 9 of the 10 sampled 
taxpayers will pay lower taxes in 1983 with either appropriation 
proposal than in 1979. 

3 



AVAILABLE FUNDS TO COVER 
BUDGET AND WARRANT ARTICLE APPROPRIATIONS 

(Fiscal Years; $000, s) 



Sources 



Property Tax Levy (2^ Limit) 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

User Fees and Other 

Interest 

State Aid 

Other Revenue and Free Cash 



Uses 

Assessments: State, County, MBTA 
Overlay 



NET AVAILABLE FUNDS 



1982 


1983 


Actual 


Estimated 


$4,031 


$4,211 


162 


165 


285 


192 


232 


160 


716 


700 


533 


640 


$5,959 


$6^,068 



441 


448 


55 


60 


$ 496 


$ 508 


$5,463 


$5,560 



The largest margin for error among listed revenue items is probably 
embedded in the estimate of State Aid. While it seems unlikely that 
State grants to local units will be reduced, there is a good possibility 
that Lincoln may be hurt .by a change in the apportionment formula. The 
remaining revenue estimates, apart from the Property Tax Levy which is 
fixed by Proposition 2^, have been checked just recently against 
accumulating 1982 experience (on which they ultimately will be based 
for tax certification), and we have no basis for attempting to refine 
them further. On the assessments side, we have recently increased the 
MBTA estimate, more than offsetting an anticipated reduction in the 
cost of County government. In short, both revenue and assessment 
estimates are intended to be realistic, "most likely" figures; they 
have not been deliberately weighted in a conservative or optimistic 
direction. 

The conclusion, that $5,560,000 can be appropriated under Propo- 
sition 2k for Warrant Articles and the Town Operating and Education 
budget, also fixes the limit for additional spending which would be 
authorized by passage of Referendum Question 1. That actio- 1 would 
raise the tax levy limit by $100,000, and thereby increase the spending 
limit to $5,660,000. 



APPROPRIATION PROPOSALS 

The two spending proposals allocate available funds among the 

Town Operating and Education budgets and Warrant Article appropriations 

as shown below. Figures for 1982 are again included for comparison. 



ALLOCATION OF NET AVAILABLE FUNDS 





1982 Actual 
Amount % 

$2,491 45% 
2,791 51 
196 4 
$5,478 100% 


1983 Proposals 




Town Operating Budget 
Education 
Warrant Articles 
Total 


Numbe r 1 
Amount 

$2,636 
2,869 

55 
$5,560 


(2k) 

% 

4 7% 
52 

1 
100% 


Numbe r 
Amount 

$2,660 

2,884 

68 

$5,612 


2 
% 

47% 

51 

1 

99% 



Total appropriations for 1983 are shown above to increase very 
little from 1982, about 1.5% for the l\ proposal and 2.4% for the 
recommended proposal. The dollar difference between Education budgets 
and the Town Operating budget will narrow, but Lincoln will continue 
to spend somewhat more than half of its available funds on Education 
under both proposals. 

As for Warrant Article appropriations, it should be noted that 
both proposals present relatively small totals ($55,000 and $68,000). 
The figures have been reduced from the total now being planned for 
presentation to Town Meeting ($88,000), and they are small relative 
to the $300,000 average voted at Town Meetings over the last three 
years. In one sense they have been used this year as a budget-balancer, 
permitting Town Operating and Education budgets to be fitted into the 
straitjacket of Proposition l\ limits without additional trimming. 
It is clear, however, that they cannot be used that way again. And 
more importantly, it is clear that they spell trouble for Operating 
and Education budgets in the future if they are increased to more 
customary levels while Proposition l\ still reigns. 

Finally, we call attention to the fact that Proposal #2 does not 
eat up all of the $100,000 increase in taxes which would be authorized 
by a "Yes" vote on Referendum Question 1. It would absorb $52,000. 
The remaining $48,000 of taxing authority is needed, we think, to 
provide some means of dealing with the discovery of revenue and/or 
assessment estimating errors , the approval of more spending than is 
recommended here, and other unforeseen developments. 



TOWN OPERATING BUDGETS 

The two proposals present Town Operating budgets of $2,636,000 (2^) 
and $2,660,000. The l\ budget is up $145,000 or 5.8% over 1982; the 
recommended budget is up $169,000 or 6.8%. Those are the smallest 
annual increases which have been proposed (or voted) for an Operating 
budget for many years. They reflect the cooperating effort of Town 
administrators to meet or come close to this Committee's 3% guideline, 
announced last November. 

The recommended Operating budget is tight. It incorporates cuts 
of $54,000 from the Selectmen's preferred "prudent" budget. Select- 
men may have something to say on this subject at Town Meeting. 



Distribution of Proposed Expenditures 

Lincoln's spending priorities have not changed much over the past 
ten years, and there is little evident change in the distribution of 
expenditures proposed for 1983. 



DISTRIBUTION OF OPERATING BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS 







1981-82, 1982-83 












Amount ($000 


,s) 


Percent 










82-83 






82-83 




Activity 


81 
$ 


-82 
344 




Rec* 
$ 373 


81-82 

13.8% 


2k 


Rec* 


Genl. Govt. 


$ 365 


13.9% 


14.0% 


Public Safety 




630 


670 


672 


25.3 


25.5 


25.3 


Public Works 




415 


446 


452 


16.7 


16.9 


17.0 


Library 




181 


196 


196 


7.3 


7.4 


7.4 


Conservation 




lOOW 101 


101 


4.0 


3.8 


3.8 


Employee Ins-Pen: 


sions 


322 


366 


366 


12.9 


13.9 


13.8 


Prop/Ind. Insur . 




97 


101 


101 


3.9 


3.8 


3.8 


Debt Service 




215 


174 


174 


8.6 


6.6 


6.5 


Other 




186 


217 


225 


7.5 


8.2 


8.4 


Total 


£1 


,491 


$2,636 


$2,660 


100.0% 


100.0% 


100.0% 


* 

Recommended 









Conservation expenses for last year are shown $15,000 higher than 
was reported in last year's budget, to make them consistent with 
this year's figures. The method of accounting for use of Conser- 
vation Agency Account funds was changed this year. 



The largest relative, and absolute, increase from last year 
($44,000) represents employee benefit programs - the Town's contri- 
bution to pension fund and health and other employee insurance plans. 
This should be remembered while considering the following section on 
wage and salary increases. The major spending centers, Public Safety, 
Public Works and General Government, have all been maintained at about 
the same relative level. Their budgets project anticipated wage and 
salary and expense increases, no important personnel additions, and 
no major service changes. There is one comment, however, to make 
on each budget. The projected increase for Fire and Police would be 
$20,000 larger in the absence of our recommendation to cut the 
"Hydrant Charge" by that amount. The DPW increase is intended to 
support some step up in road repairs, recognizing that the program 
may have been cut too heavily last year. As for General Government, we 
should call attention to the effort which is being made at Town Hall 
and Center School to control unnecessary personnel and office expenses. 
Last year expenditures for this collection of activities rose by about 
$85,000; this year the increase has been held below $30,000, under 
both budget proposals. 

And finally, it is worth noting that the sole category scheduled 
for relative and absolute decrease next year is Debt Service (by $41,000) 
The drop continues a well established trend. Lincoln's bonded 
indebtedness has now dropped below $1,000,000, but that dividing line 
will undoubtedly be recrossed before long. 



Wages and Salaries 

The budgets for Fire and Police and DPW incorporate estimates of 
wage and salary increases which are governed by terms of current union 
contracts. The contracts contain cost-of-living escalators as well 
as step increases and hence the amount of pay raises in store for 
1983 is impossible to estimate with certainty. Our best guess is that 
the average will fall in the 8% - 10% range . 

For non-union employees, the Personnel Board recommended a 10-^% 
salary pool increase. The Selectmen concurred and the Finance 
Committee disagreed. We do agree, as we wrote last year, that it is 
all-important for the Town to "continue the long-accepted objective 
of attempting to reward employees fairly for their services." However 
10^% ($58,000) seemed high to us, in the midst of the country's worst 
postwar recession. Last year the salary pool increase was settled at 
9%, and that, we think, is a reasonable average increase to repeat. 
Accordingly, we have cut the 10-5% proposal by $7,000, in both budgets. 



Differences Between Recommended and 2-$ Budgets 

The money difference between the recommended and l\ Town Operating 
budgets is $24,000, distributed as follows: 



2h Cuts from Recommended Budget 



Line Item Amount 



Public Safety - Hydrant charge 
General Govt. 

Planning Bd . - Professional Service! 

Town Hall - Center School - Janitor 
Public Works - Summer help 
Board of Health - Sanitarian 
Reserve Fund 

Total 



113 



$ 2,000 



080 


2,000 


015 


6,000 


300 


3,000 


200 


1,000 


925 


10,000 



$24,000 



The above cuts would be added, to reemphasize the point, to $54,000 
which has already been taken from the Selectmen's original budget. 

The one item of some size which differentiates the lh Operating 
budget from the recommended budget is the Reserve Fund appropriation. 
That, candidly, is a difficult item to judge. The l\ budget cut would 
reduce the Fund appropriation from $75,000 to $65,000, which could be 
a dangerously low figure for a very tight budget. The evidence is 
that almost $60,000 of prospective Reserve Fund Transfers is already 
in sight for the underbudgeted accounts of 1982. 

The other items of difference between the two Operating budgets 
suggest the extent of cutting which was required to reach the 2h level 
None of the affected services (janitorial, public health inspection, 
Planning Board professional assistance, summer roadside trash pickup 
and brush cutting) can be claimed to be essential, but all are 
considered desirable for their cost by most members of this Committee. 
More will be said on these matters at Town Meeting. 



EDUCATION 

Appropriations for Education are budgeted to increase from 
$2,791,000 this year to $2,884,000 (recommended budget) in 1983. The 
increase of $93,000 (3%), like the increase in the Operating budget, 
is the smallest we have seen in years. The breakdown among schools 
follows: 



EDUCATION BUDGETS 





■gh 


Amount 


($000, s) 


School 


2\ 


Recommended 


Elementary 
Regional Hi 
Minuteman 
Total 


$2,218 

614 

37 

$2,869 


$2,233 

614 

37 

$2,884 



Change from 1982 
Recommended Budget 
Amount Percent 



$65 
36 
(8) 

$93 



3.0% 
6.2 

(17.8) 
3.3% 



Elementary Schools 

In January the School Committee voted to limit the budget increase 
for 1983 to 3%, in line with this Committee's guideline. Teacher and 
administration salary increases of more than that amount lay ahead, 
and hence there was a difficult balancing of personnel and expense 
cuts and program changes to be faced. The School Committee met their 
target (3.0% increase, above), and their budget is recommended without 
change by most members of this Committee. 

The l\ proposal, in contrast, would reduce the Elementary budget 
by $15,000. The immediate rationale for such a cut stems from the 
imposition on the Town Operating budget (Unclassified, Line Item 901) 
of unexpectedly large charges for benefit programs for school 
employees.!./ Beneath that reaction is the basic opinion that schools 
are better able to absorb an incremental cut of $15,000, judged by 
likely service losses. 



Lincoln - Sudbury Regional High School 

The trend which has favored Lincoln in the apportionment of 
Regional' s costs has been broken, and Lincoln's share will increase 
somewhat in the coming year (growing from 13.5% to 13.9%). The total 
assessment on both Towns exceeds $4.4 million, and a reversal of 
trend, if it continues, will therefore add significantly to Lincoln's 
future obligations. 

The Town's contribution to Regional for 1983 has been fixed at 
$613,500. Almost half of the $36,000 increase over 1982 is accounted 
for by the apportionment change, and hence it can be seen that 
Regional too will be operating with a very tight budget. 



Minute man Vo-Tech 

Enrollment of Lincoln students at Minuteman has continued to 
drop. Only 12 are there this year, and consequently Lincoln will bear 
only 1% or so of the total apportioned cost. Our contribution of 
$36,000 compares with $47,000 in 1982. 



1. This is an accounting problem with roots in the distant, past which 
must be changed next year. 



WARRANT ARTICLES 

The warrant this year contains six special articles which would 
increase tax-financed spending by about $88,000, if passed. They are 
listed below, with an extension to show how each is treated in our 
spending proposals. 



Article 


Amount 


Proposal #1 (2k 


) Proposal #2 


DPW - Con. Com. Equip. 


$31,000 


$18,000 


$31,000 


Center School Renov. 


25,000 


15,000 


15,000 


Building Improve. 


10,000 


10,000 


10,000 


Rte. 126 Bike Path 


10,000 


- 


- 


Housing Com - Financing 


9,000 


9,000 


9,000 


Flag Pole 


3,000 


3,000 


3,000 


Total 


$88,000 


$55,000 


$68j000 



The Finance Committee will distribute a handout at Town Meeting, 
as we have before, which reviews the pros and cons of each warrant 
article proposal and presents the Committee's recommendations for "Yes" 
or "No" votes. We can't do that here because some important proposals 
are still being formed. 

The difference between proposals for Warrant Article spending 
(above) is focused on the DPW - Conservation Commission request for 
equipment purchase funds. The amount at issue ($13,000) concerns 
the purchase of a light dump truck. The truck would replace a 
Conservation heap, which expired. A majority of the Finance Committee 
favors purchase of a replacement, among other reasons, to reduce DPW - 
Conservation Commission dispute over "use-rights" to the one remaining 
light dump truck. 

Among other warrant article proposals, we do not have firm 
positions on the Housing Commission's article, which may entail $9,000 
interim financing expense, or the Bike Path Committee's article, which 
requests $10,000 more for construction of the long delayed Rte. 126 
path. One has been included in our recommended spending proposal and 
one excluded. That says nothing more at this stage, however, than 
that preliminary opinions were forced to obtain an estimate of the 
sum of recommended Warrant Article appropriations for this Report. 



Lincoln Finance Committee 



Edward S. Dewey Charlotte Friel 
David M. Elwood Sarah Holden 
Lawrence E. Thompson, Chrm. 



10 



EXHIBIT 1 

Town of Lincoln 
Tax Requirement 
1982-83 PROPOSALS vs. 1981-82 ACTUAL 
($000's) 



1982-83 Proposals 



Town Budget (Warrant Article 5) 
Other Warrant Articles 



Funds available to offset against 
appropriations 
l)Free Cash 
2) Revenue Sharing 
3)Metco Funds 

4)Receipts in lieu of taxes 
5) Other 

Total Warrant Articles to be paid 
by taxation 

Cherry Sheet Assessments 
Overlay 

Total Expenditures to be raised 
by taxation 

Other Sources of Funds: 

1) State § Local Aid Funds 

2) Motor Vehicle Excise 

3) Other (net) 



Total to be raised by taxation 

Property Valuation 

Tax Rate (per thousand) 



2h_ 



$5,505 

55 

5,560 



Rec* 



$5,544 

68 

5,612 



1981-82 
Actual 



300 


300 


214 


62 


62 


75 


93 


93 


89 


58 


58 


53 


127 


127 


92 


640 


640 


523 


4,920 


4,972 


4,930 


448 


448 


441 


60 


60 


55 


508 


508 


496 


5,428 


5,480 


5,426 


700 


700 


716 


165 


165 


162 


352 


352 


517 


1,217 


1,217 


1,395 


$4,211 


$4,263 


$4,031 


$270 


,000 


$242,000 


$15.60- 


$15.80 


$16.60 



*Recommended 



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22 



WARRANT 
1982 NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify the legal 
voters of said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town Meeting for the trans- 
action of Town Affairs to meet in the Brooks School Auditorium in said Lincoln 
on Saturday, the twenty-seventh day of March next, at 9:30 a.m., then and there 
to act on the following articles, except Article 1, and also to meet at the 
Smith School Gymnasium on Monday, the twenty-ninth day of March next, at 
7:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following Article 1, by posting a copy 
of this Warrant, by you attested, in said Town, seven days at least before the 
twenty-seventh day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Monday, March twenty-ninth, will 
be opened at 7:30 a.m. and will be closed at 8:00 p.m. 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in their votes for one member for each of the 
following offices: 

Town Clerk for one year 
Selectman for three years 
Treasurer for one year 
Assessor for three years 
Collector of Taxes for one year 

One member of the School Committee for three years 
Water Commissioner for three years 
Member of Board of Health for three years 
Cemetery Commissioner for three years 
Planning Board member for five years 
Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years 
Trustee of the Bemis Fund for three years 
Director of DeCordova & Dana Museum & Park for four years 
Member of the Housing Commission for three years 
Member of the Recreation Committee for three years 
Tree Warden for one year 

Regional District School Committee member (2) for three years 
and also the following questions: 

(1) "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to assess an additional 
$100,779. in real estate and personal property taxes for the fiscal year 
beginning July first, nineteen hundred and eighty-two?" 

(2) "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to assess an additional 
$250,000. in real estate and personal property taxes for the fiscal year 
beginning July first, nineteen hundred and eighty two?" 



25 



ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, Commissioners, 

Trustees, and other officers required by law to be elected by 
ballot, or otherwise. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town Officers, Committees 
Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several elective 
officers of the Town and to determine whether any Department, 
Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for additional compensation 
any of its members and to fix additional compensation of such members. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and expedient 
purposes of the Town, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer 

with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time 
to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 
1, 1982, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 4, as amended, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within 
one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less 
than one year, in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, 
as amended. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen and 

the School Committee to continue the Town's annual contract 
with the Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary school at L.G. Hanscom 
Field, Bedford, Massachusetts or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee § Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to support the School Committee 
in its continuing plan to bring a limited number of children 
from Boston to the Lincoln Schools for purposes of education, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 

of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, said sum to be used for the purpose of 
a new flag pole to be erected on the Library grounds, and to see if the Town 
will authorize the disposal of the existing wooden pole by sale or otherwise 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate gifts of money 

and income received from use of conservation properties for 
the maintenance and improvement of conservation properties, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate gifts of money 

and income received by the Youth Committee for the purpose of 
funding certain trips and activities sponsored and directed by said committee 



24 



or take any other action relative thereto. 

Youth Committee 

ARTICLE 12 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for the purpose of 

providing housing for persons of low and moderate income and 
others whose needs may be identified from time to time, by purchase, eminent 
domain, or any other way, all or part of two parcels of land, one owned by 
the Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln and shown outlined in red on a plan 
entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts", dated July 11, 1979 and 
revised February, 1981 by Cleverdon, Varney £ Pike, Consulting Engineers, on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk and the other owned by heirs of R.D. 
Donaldson and shown outlined in red on a plan entitled "Preliminary Plan 
of Land in Lincoln", dated March 1, 1978 by Cleverdon, Varney and Pike, 
Consulting Engineers, on file in the office of the Town Clerk; to authorize 
the Town to sell as condominiums a portion of the parcels as part of an 
overall scheme to benefit persons of low and moderate income and others; to 
authorize the Lincoln Housing Commission, on behalf of the Town, to do all 
things necessary for the development of rental and other housing for said 
purpose on all or part of said parcels, including the sale as condominiums 
of a portion of the development as part of an overall scheme to benefit 
persons of low and moderate income and others; to lease part or all of said 
parcels to the Lincoln Housing Commission or its designee; for those purposes 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500,000. by borrowing, by taxation, or 
by any combination of those methods, and to issue bonds or notes, or any 
combination thereof, in an amount not in excess of $2,500,000; and to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Housing Commission 

ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to change from an R-l Single 

Family Residence District to an R-2 General Residence District 
the parcel of land described below and to amend the Zoning Map of the Town 
to reflect those changes, or take any other action relative thereto. 

A certain parcel of land owned by the Rural Land Foundation of 
Lincoln and shown outlined in red on a plan entitled "Plan 
of Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts", dated July 11, 1979, and 
revised February 1981 by Cleverdon, Varney & Pike, Consulting 
Engineers. 

Housing Commission 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the by-laws of DeCordova 

and Dana Museum and Park by changing the Governance of said 
corporation to permit participation in the governance of persons who are not 
registered voters or residents of the Town of Lincoln or take any other actior 
relative thereto, A copy of the By-laws is available in the office of the 
Town Clerk. 

DeCordova £ Dana Museum 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to approve a new schedule of fees 

to be used by the Sealer of Weights and Measures, as author- 
ized by Section 56 of Chapter 98, as most recently amended, said schedule 
being presently on file in the office of the Town Clerk and available for 
inspection, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



25 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 

money, by borrowing, by transfer from available funds or a 
combination thereof, said sum to be used for the construction, reconstruction 
and/or maintenance and repair of roads and bridges and the enforcement of 
traffic laws and that the Treasurer be authorized to borrow in anticipation 
of reimbursement by the Commonwealth under Chapter 283, Acts of 1976 or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to ratify the action of the 

Selectmen in accepting the provisions of Sections 20A and 
20A^ of Chapter 90 of the General Laws as amended, and will vote to accept 
said Sections 20A and 20A^ as amended or take any other action relative thereto, 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 1 of Article II 

of its General By-Laws to change the time and date of the 
Annual Town Meeting for the transaction of all business, except the election 
of officers and determination of such matters as by law are required to be 
elected or determined by ballot, from the Saturday before the last Monday in 
March in each year to a time and date in the month of May of each year, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee £ Selectmen 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to modify the 

conservation restriction heretofore granted by Alan and Louise 
H. McClennen for the benefit of the Town over a certain parcel of land abutt- 
ing Silver Hill Road and Weston Road by allowing the present subdivision road 
on said land to be moved from the middle of said parcel to the southerly 
border of said parcel, or take any other action relative thereto. 

By Petition 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to support the submission of a 

petition to the General Court which would allow the Town, 
through its Board of Selectmen, to issue licenses for the sale of malt bever- 
ages and wine to be consumed on the premises where sold, or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

By Petition 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 

of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, said sum to be used to provide build- 
ing and grounds improvements to the Center School, the Town Hall and the 
Smith School or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will authorize the filing of a petition to 
the General Court in substantially the following language: 

AN ACT TO AUTHORIZE THE TOWN OF LINCOLN TO REGULATE HANDGUNS 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in the General 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: 

Section 1. Notwithstanding any provisions set forth in the 
General Laws, the Town of Lincoln is hereby empowered to enact a by-law 
which regulates the distribution, sale and possession of handguns. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Selectmen 

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ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 

money, by taxation, by transfer from available funds, or any 
combination thereof, said sum to be used for the purpose of providing Lincoln's 
share of the funding for the Hanscom Area Traffic Committee or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen £ Planning Board 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 23.4 of the 

Zoning By-Laws as most recently amended on June 18, 1981 as 
follows: Section 23.4, the definition of "dwelling unit" shall be amended by 
striking the words "or more individuals living as a single housekeeping unit" 
in the third line thereof and substituting therefor the word "family", and to 
see if the Town will vote to add a new Section 23.4.1, to be inserted after 
Section 23.4 and shall read as follows: "Family: One or more individuals re- 
lated by blood, adoption, or marriage (exclusive of household servants), living 
and cooking together as a single housekeeping unit; provided, however, that no 
more than two individuals living and cooking together as a single housekeeping 
unit though not related by blood, adoption, or marriage, shall be deemed to 
constitute a family; and provided, further, that a family as defined herein may 
include any. number of foster children placed therewith, by an agency authorized 
and licensed by the Commonwealth, for the purpose of obtaining the benefits of 
a normal family environment, so long as such placement remains subject to 
regulation, supervision, and inspection by the Commonwealth." or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

By Petition 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 

money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrow- 
ing, or any combination thereof, said sum to be used for the purchase of equip- 
ment for the use of various Town departments and to see if the Town will author- 
ize the disposal by sale or otherwise, of excess vehicles and equipment or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 

money by taxation, by transfer of available funds or any combin- 
ation thereof, said sum to be used for the repair and maintenance of certain 
Town Buildings, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 27 . To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money to 

fund an alternative budget committee which will distribute to 
all voters in January, 1983, alternative budgets in traditional and functional 
form, far more detailed than Article 5, together with pros and cons as is done 
in State pamphlets on referenda, for the purpose of giving voters early intell- 
igent choices; such committee to consist of one or more members appointed by 
the Moderator or by Town Committees and accepting volunteers. 

By Petition 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 

be added to the amounts appropriated under Article 32 of the 
Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting on March 25, 1978, and Article 29 of the 
Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting on March 27, 1979, and Article 12 on the 
Warrant for the Special Town Meeting of June 16, 1981 for the laying out and 
the construction of a bicycle path on Concord Road (Route 126) from its inter- 
section with South Great Road (Route 117) to Baker Bridge Road, as shown on a 
plan prepared by Joseph W. Moore, Co., Land Surveyors and Civil Engineers, 
presently on file with the Town Clerk and available for inspection; to determine 
if said sum shall be raised by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing, or by any combination thereof and that the appropriate officials are 
authorized to apply to the Commonwealth to obtain reimbursements of a part of 
the cost of said bicycle path; or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 
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ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to reject the evacuation plans 

described in the draft document entitled "Relocation Instruc- 
tions - Boston Risk Area - Suburban West"; and to see if the Town will vote 
to authorize the Selectmen to appoint a committee to institute a program to 
inform Lincoln citizens about the full impact on the Boston Risk Area of a 
nuclear attack; and to raise and appropriate a sum of money to be supplemented 
by private contributions to cover the costs of such program; or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

By Petition 5 Selectmen 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from Free Cash, a 

sum of money, said sum to be added to amounts appropriated 
under Article 5 of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of March 28, 1981, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available 

funds of the Water Department, a sum of money, said sum to be 
added to amounts appropriated under Article 5 of the Warrant of the Annual 
Town Meeting of March 28, 1981, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen $ Water Commissioners 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money, by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, such sum to be used for the purpose of 
funding certain energy conservation measures in various Town buildings or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Energy Committee 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to acquire for conservation 

purposes, by purchase by eminent domain, or any other way, a 
parcel of land belonging to William F. Herman, containing approximately 
22.50 acres of land, located on the easterly side of Silver Hill Road, as 
shown on a sketch plan of land in Lincoln on file in the office of the Town 
Clerk, and for that purpose to raise and appropriate a sum of money by tax- 
ation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any other way, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 

of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, said sum to be used for the purpose of 
connecting existing water mains on Blueberry Lane to the existing water main 
on Davison Drive off Page Road, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings thereon to 
the Town Clerk, at or before the time for the meeting aforesaid. Given under 
our hands this second day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand nine 
hundred eighty two. 



Henry M. Morgan 
Ann F. Sutherland 
John A. Ritsher 
SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 

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